Date   

Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #scandinavia

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #scandinavia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #sephardic

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #sephardic

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #scandinavia

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #scandinavia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #sephardic

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #sephardic

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Re: Question about SHAPIRO ancestries #rabbinic

Dan Rottenberg <dan@...>
 

David,

The short answer is: All those spellings derive >from the same root,
which is Spira -- meaning >from the town of Speyer. And they're
probably (but not definitely) all connected to that famous rabbinic
dynasty.

Good luck!

Dan Rottenberg
Philadelphia PA

On Jan 7, 2018, at 8:51 AM, David E Goldman lugman@verizon.net
...I am aware that there was a famous rabbinical family in
Poland that included rabbis with that name. Now the issue is whether
this means my family's descent >from that rabbinical family since
spellings of the last name varied among SHAPIRO, SHAPIRA, SPIRO and
SPIRA...


Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #rabbinic

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #rabbinic

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Question about SHAPIRO ancestries #rabbinic

Dan Rottenberg <dan@...>
 

David,

The short answer is: All those spellings derive >from the same root,
which is Spira -- meaning >from the town of Speyer. And they're
probably (but not definitely) all connected to that famous rabbinic
dynasty.

Good luck!

Dan Rottenberg
Philadelphia PA

On Jan 7, 2018, at 8:51 AM, David E Goldman lugman@verizon.net
...I am aware that there was a famous rabbinical family in
Poland that included rabbis with that name. Now the issue is whether
this means my family's descent >from that rabbinical family since
spellings of the last name varied among SHAPIRO, SHAPIRA, SPIRO and
SPIRA...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #rabbinic

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #rabbinic

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


17 Generations of Chief Rabbis #rabbinic

Claudia Bullock <cbulloc8@...>
 

Below is a copy of an announcement >from the Jewish Chronicle from
1905, about the death of my 2nd great grandmother (my grandmother's
grandmother) Mrs. Eva Leah Spero, whose father, Moses Katzenellenbogen
was the last in a line of 17 generations of Chief Rabbis! My problem
is that I'm really having trouble figuring out how to trace this
lineage back any further than Moses Katzenellenbogen himself, who was
the very end of the line (due to Eva Leah being his only child). I
cannot for the life of me figure out who his parents would have been.
All of the information I have is what appears in the attached death
announcement. My aunt had this on her wall, and I took a picture of
it with my phone. Any assistance would be much appreciated.

"We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Eva Leah Spero, widow of the
late Reverend Wolfe Marcus Spero, which occurred on Saturday at the
residence of her son, Reverend Emanuel Spero, of the Central
Synagogue. Mrs. Spero was the only child of the late Moses
Katzenellenbogen who was appointed Chief Rabbi of Krementchug, South
Russia, early in the Nineteenth Century. He was the last of a line of
seventeen consecutive generations of Chief Rabbis, all famous for
their Learning. A large number of their books are in the library of
the British Museum, and Mrs. Spero's father was the author of:

"Hamburg 105L (...) "Talmudic Index"
"Frankfort on Main 1853 (,..) "Talmudic Index"
"Frankfort on Main 1857 (...) "Stettin 1864"

Mrs. Spero was very proud of her lineage, and she was a very amiable,
studious, and thoroughly good woman. A daughter was married to the
Reverend Lionel Geffen of the West End Synagogue, other children are
Mr. Isaac Spero of Portsmouth, and Mrs C. Aarons of New York."

Jewish Chronicle
London England
1905

Claudia Bullock


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic 17 Generations of Chief Rabbis #rabbinic

Claudia Bullock <cbulloc8@...>
 

Below is a copy of an announcement >from the Jewish Chronicle from
1905, about the death of my 2nd great grandmother (my grandmother's
grandmother) Mrs. Eva Leah Spero, whose father, Moses Katzenellenbogen
was the last in a line of 17 generations of Chief Rabbis! My problem
is that I'm really having trouble figuring out how to trace this
lineage back any further than Moses Katzenellenbogen himself, who was
the very end of the line (due to Eva Leah being his only child). I
cannot for the life of me figure out who his parents would have been.
All of the information I have is what appears in the attached death
announcement. My aunt had this on her wall, and I took a picture of
it with my phone. Any assistance would be much appreciated.

"We regret to announce the death of Mrs. Eva Leah Spero, widow of the
late Reverend Wolfe Marcus Spero, which occurred on Saturday at the
residence of her son, Reverend Emanuel Spero, of the Central
Synagogue. Mrs. Spero was the only child of the late Moses
Katzenellenbogen who was appointed Chief Rabbi of Krementchug, South
Russia, early in the Nineteenth Century. He was the last of a line of
seventeen consecutive generations of Chief Rabbis, all famous for
their Learning. A large number of their books are in the library of
the British Museum, and Mrs. Spero's father was the author of:

"Hamburg 105L (...) "Talmudic Index"
"Frankfort on Main 1853 (,..) "Talmudic Index"
"Frankfort on Main 1857 (...) "Stettin 1864"

Mrs. Spero was very proud of her lineage, and she was a very amiable,
studious, and thoroughly good woman. A daughter was married to the
Reverend Lionel Geffen of the West End Synagogue, other children are
Mr. Isaac Spero of Portsmouth, and Mrs C. Aarons of New York."

Jewish Chronicle
London England
1905

Claudia Bullock


Re: Should companies change default sorting to largest segment? #dna

charles goldenzon
 

Ben,

I can only think that it comes down to being able to predict
relationships. Using the longest segment would not allow companies to
predict relationships as they do now with total cM's shared. Or at
least not as easy.

The recombination process that takes place with autosomal DNA is random.
It would be much harder, if at all possible, for companies to predict
how many crossovers would exist in each chromosome and where they would
be. Also, chromosomes vary in size. Without this, one cannot determine a
standard segment length to associate with a particular relationship.

The use of total cM's shared is a very good predictor up to 2nd cousins.
Beyond that, the variation observed in total cM's shared as a percentage
of the expected average cM's shared becomes more pronounced and this
makes it more difficult to predict relationships. So i think you did a
valid exercise by also sorting by the longest segment. Still i guess
total cM's shared is the best way companies can, with existing
technology and knowledge, predict relationships.

Regards,

Charles Goldenzon
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


Registration is OPEN for the 2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference #latvia

IAJGS 2018 Listserv Communications <iajgs2018@...>
 

The IAJGS is delighted to announce that the 2018 Warsaw Conference to
be held Sunday, August 5, 2018 through noon on Friday, August 10, 2018
at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel & Convention Centre is now open for
full-paying conference attendees to register at an early bird price.
The conference website is for more information and a link to the
registration form. Please read the Registration Overview and Terms of
Conditions before registering. The early-bird price will be in effect
until April 28, 2018 for full-paying attendees and their significant
others.

The official conference language will be English. The program will
include over 150 presentations on a variety of subjects including
available archival material, research methodology, and the history of
Jewish communities throughout Central and Eastern Europe.
Presentations will be aimed at everyone, >from "first-time" conference
attendees to veterans of IAJGS conferences, and >from beginner to
expert level genealogists.

The conference will begin officially on Sunday with an opening
reception and program at 5 pm, but prior to that there will be morning
lectures on local archival resources and how to use the conference
mobile device app, walking tours of Warsaw, and an afternoon
"ShareFair" including experts >from all over Central & Eastern Europe.
More to come about programming at a later date, but we realize that
the starting times might be of use to planning your arrival into
Warsaw.

All official conference events (lectures, panels, receptions and
workshops) will be held at the Hilton Warsaw Hotel which is located at
63 Grzybowska Street for the convenience of our attendees. We have
reserved all regular hotel rooms at the Hilton and they are blocked
for only IAJGS conference use at the present time. We will soon open
hotel registration through a link to a special webpage provided by
Hilton. We will only guarantee rooms in the conference hotel with
proof of conference registration to be sure that the hotel will be
filled by conference attendees. The special conference price will
include: free wifi, access to the Holmes Place exercise club, and an
amazing breakfast buffet - all at a very reasonable price. So stay
tuned, and if you are ready to sign up for the conference and pay for
registration, please do... and tell all your friends to join us too!

Looking forward to seeing you in Warsaw!


Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut USA
2018 IAJGS Warsaw Conference Listserv Communications Liaison


Yizkor Book Project, December 2017 #latvia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

It would seem that in the last month of 2017, the Yizkor Book Project
continued on it's very positive trend and we are definitely looking
forward to continuing, ever onwards, in 2018. I would like to take
this opportunity to thank the many, many and many volunteers who
tirelessly support the YB project in numerous ways, to the professional
translations who help reveal the hidden treasures in the Yizkor books
and, finally, to the generous donors, without whom, we couldn't go
forward with our projects.

So what did we do in December? To begin with, last month saw us seeing
the final translated pages of an additional three books go online. They
were:

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev) The book was entirely and
voluntarily translated by Sheli Fain, to whom we owe a great deal of
thanks. Yefim Kogan was there together with Sheli to help out with the
logistics and scanning and we do appreciate his drive and assistance in
seeing this project to completion.
- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik) This
translation project was energetically coordinated by Anita Gabbay who
managed to arrange its translation in a relatively short period of time
and our indebted thanks do go out to her.
- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj) The completion of this book, begun many
years ago by Mike Kalt, could not have come about without the great
number of translations by Susan Rosin, supported by translations by
other volunteers, including Yocheved Klausner and Daniella Heller. To
all of these good people, we send out a humble thanks.

Last month, we added in the necrology for Dubrovitsa, Ukraine which
includes a disturbing 2,626 victims >from this community. The necrologies,
apart >from immortalizing the names of the martyrs, also provide us with
significant information about the people, such as details of their
parents, spouses and children. I believe that over the years, we have
placed online the bulk of the necrologies >from the Yizkor books, but our
intention is to continue with this endeavor, till we have completed them
all.

Other important genealogical information we have added in recently, comes
in the form of lists of survivors often noted in the Yizkor books.
Examples of these lists, were the additions last month of a list of 277
survivors >from Krasnik and lists of survivors >from Wolbrom who lived in
Israel at the time of the Yizkor book's publishing. Once again, we will
continue to extract these lists as an important genealogical resource
supplied by the Yizkor books.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in December.

We have added in 2 new entries:

- Novo-Vitebsk, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/Jew248.html

- Trakai, Lithuania (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00358.html

And we have continued to update 27 of our existing projects:

- Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Berehove/Berehove.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Chisinau, Moldova (The Jews of Kishinev)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kishinev/Kishinev.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dubrovitsa, Ukraine (Book of Dabrowica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dubrovitsa/Dubrovitsa.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Hrodno, Belarus (Grodno; Volume IX, Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora; Memorial Book of Countries and Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/grodno/grodno.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Kock, Poland (Memorial Book of Kotsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kock/Kock.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Lenin, Belarus (The community of Lenin; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lenin/lenin.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dworp.html [Polish]

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the
ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Stolin, Belarus (Stolin; a memorial to the Jewish communities of
Stolin and vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stolin/Stolin.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wolbrom, Poland (Our Town Wolbrom)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wolbrom/wolbrom.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html
to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

A Happy, Healthy and Successful 2018,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


DNA Research #DNA Re: Should companies change default sorting to largest segment? #dna

charles goldenzon
 

Ben,

I can only think that it comes down to being able to predict
relationships. Using the longest segment would not allow companies to
predict relationships as they do now with total cM's shared. Or at
least not as easy.

The recombination process that takes place with autosomal DNA is random.
It would be much harder, if at all possible, for companies to predict
how many crossovers would exist in each chromosome and where they would
be. Also, chromosomes vary in size. Without this, one cannot determine a
standard segment length to associate with a particular relationship.

The use of total cM's shared is a very good predictor up to 2nd cousins.
Beyond that, the variation observed in total cM's shared as a percentage
of the expected average cM's shared becomes more pronounced and this
makes it more difficult to predict relationships. So i think you did a
valid exercise by also sorting by the longest segment. Still i guess
total cM's shared is the best way companies can, with existing
technology and knowledge, predict relationships.

Regards,

Charles Goldenzon
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

46621 - 46640 of 659757