Date   
Death At Birth: Another Question #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

In an effort to find the burial place for the male SCHULTZ child who possibly
died at one day old on March 28, 1918 (Bronx, NY), I checked with the
Washington Cemetery (Brooklyn, NY) where his (possible) grandmother was buried.
There is a male SCHULTZ who was buried March 31, 1918, at two days of age
(therefore, born March 29), after dying >from a hemorrhage.

Could this child possibly be the same child, given that his dates of birth are
slightly different?

He was buried in the Independent Order of Brith Abraham grounds. His possible
grandparents (Rebecca & Solomon LEVINE) were buried in "Ahavas Achimam Anshe
Tomashov Petrikof ? [sic] grounds. The person giving me the information didn't
indicate that the child was buried in a children's section.

Regards,
Marilyn Robinson

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Death At Birth: Another Question #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

In an effort to find the burial place for the male SCHULTZ child who possibly
died at one day old on March 28, 1918 (Bronx, NY), I checked with the
Washington Cemetery (Brooklyn, NY) where his (possible) grandmother was buried.
There is a male SCHULTZ who was buried March 31, 1918, at two days of age
(therefore, born March 29), after dying >from a hemorrhage.

Could this child possibly be the same child, given that his dates of birth are
slightly different?

He was buried in the Independent Order of Brith Abraham grounds. His possible
grandparents (Rebecca & Solomon LEVINE) were buried in "Ahavas Achimam Anshe
Tomashov Petrikof ? [sic] grounds. The person giving me the information didn't
indicate that the child was buried in a children's section.

Regards,
Marilyn Robinson

(European Union) Right to be Forgotten French Court Expands to Worldwide Reach of Search Engine #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I have posted on this discussion list before about the European Union (EU)
and their Court decision about the "right to be forgotten" and the recent
non-binding guidelines that would expand the EU data protection privacy
rules on search engines that operate outside the EU. Genealogists are very
concerned about the loss of vital information and records due to the EU's
principle of right to be forgotten that are critical to accessing
genealogical information.

Mr. Shefet, a Danish lawyer living in France asked Google.fr to take down
links that were defamatory to him (he has been accused of online of
professional malpractice, fraud and having connections to the Serbian
mafia-all of which he strongly denies.) Google.fr complied with request.

However, after the EU Court decision against Google last May (see:
http://tinyurl.com/m8fpysv )
MOD. NOTE: original URL - http://curia.europa.eu/juris/document/document.jsf?text=&docid=150642&pageIndex=0&doclang=EN&mode=req&dir=&occ=first&part=1&cid=24797

Mr. Shefet sued Google.fr citing the right-to-be-forgotten decision and asked
that a Paris Court force the company to remove the links in all of Google's
worldwide search engine domains. Mr. Shefet won - setting a precedent that
the EU Court's ruling applies both inside and outside the EU. The decision
held on a specific finding in a recent privacy ruling saying "a company's
local subsidiary could be held liable for the activities of its parent".
Google was fined $1,100 daily until the links are removed. No payments have
been made.

The key issue is whether the EU can enforce its privacy rulings outside of
the EU. The ruling effects not just Google which is the largest search
engine in Europe, but other search engines as well.

Thus far, Google has received 760,000 requests for link-removal and complied
with 40% per Google's latest Transparency Report which was updated on
February 2, 2015
(https://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/europeprivacy/?hl=en ).

Google created a committee to counsel them on how to handle the EU
right-to-be-forgotten standard. The report is due out later this month.
According to an article in the New York Times, http://tinyurl.com/n6gvgvr
Original url:

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/01/questions-for-europes-right-to-be-forgotten/?emc=eta1&_r=0
there are differences of opinions on the committee as to whether the reach
of the EU right-to-be-forgotten is outside the EU.

Thank you to Paul Silverstone, IAJGS Treasurer and member of the IAJGS Public
Records Access Monitoring Committee for bringing the NY Times article to our
attention.

While there have been past postings to this discussion group, a fuller
history of what is happening is available on the IAJGS Records Access Alert.
As JewishGen does not permit advocacy on this discussion list, any advocacy
is included in the IAJGS Records Access alert. To read the past postings on
the EU and the right-to-be forgotten go to the IAJGS Records Access Alert
archives at: - http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/
You must be a registered subscriber to access the archives. To register go
to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts
and follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
which JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen is your affiliation You will receive an email
response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (European Union) Right to be Forgotten French Court Expands to Worldwide Reach of Search Engine #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

I have posted on this discussion list before about the European Union (EU)
and their Court decision about the "right to be forgotten" and the recent
non-binding guidelines that would expand the EU data protection privacy
rules on search engines that operate outside the EU. Genealogists are very
concerned about the loss of vital information and records due to the EU's
principle of right to be forgotten that are critical to accessing
genealogical information.

Mr. Shefet, a Danish lawyer living in France asked Google.fr to take down
links that were defamatory to him (he has been accused of online of
professional malpractice, fraud and having connections to the Serbian
mafia-all of which he strongly denies.) Google.fr complied with request.

However, after the EU Court decision against Google last May (see:
http://tinyurl.com/m8fpysv )
MOD. NOTE: original URL - http://curia.europa.eu/juris/document/document.jsf?text=&docid=150642&pageIndex=0&doclang=EN&mode=req&dir=&occ=first&part=1&cid=24797

Mr. Shefet sued Google.fr citing the right-to-be-forgotten decision and asked
that a Paris Court force the company to remove the links in all of Google's
worldwide search engine domains. Mr. Shefet won - setting a precedent that
the EU Court's ruling applies both inside and outside the EU. The decision
held on a specific finding in a recent privacy ruling saying "a company's
local subsidiary could be held liable for the activities of its parent".
Google was fined $1,100 daily until the links are removed. No payments have
been made.

The key issue is whether the EU can enforce its privacy rulings outside of
the EU. The ruling effects not just Google which is the largest search
engine in Europe, but other search engines as well.

Thus far, Google has received 760,000 requests for link-removal and complied
with 40% per Google's latest Transparency Report which was updated on
February 2, 2015
(https://www.google.com/transparencyreport/removals/europeprivacy/?hl=en ).

Google created a committee to counsel them on how to handle the EU
right-to-be-forgotten standard. The report is due out later this month.
According to an article in the New York Times, http://tinyurl.com/n6gvgvr
Original url:

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/02/01/questions-for-europes-right-to-be-forgotten/?emc=eta1&_r=0
there are differences of opinions on the committee as to whether the reach
of the EU right-to-be-forgotten is outside the EU.

Thank you to Paul Silverstone, IAJGS Treasurer and member of the IAJGS Public
Records Access Monitoring Committee for bringing the NY Times article to our
attention.

While there have been past postings to this discussion group, a fuller
history of what is happening is available on the IAJGS Records Access Alert.
As JewishGen does not permit advocacy on this discussion list, any advocacy
is included in the IAJGS Records Access alert. To read the past postings on
the EU and the right-to-be forgotten go to the IAJGS Records Access Alert
archives at: - http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/
You must be a registered subscriber to access the archives. To register go
to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts
and follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
which JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen is your affiliation You will receive an email
response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

Thank you for input on Schepsel/Yosef VOGEL #general

Toby Bird
 

Thank you all who weighed in privately and publicly on the likelihood that
Schepsel and Yosef might be the same person and whether it's likely that
Solomon Vogel/Fogal is the brother of my husband's grandfather Samuel Bird
and Samuel's brothers Max and Marcus Bird.

There was no concensus on that point but there was a lively and interesting
discussion. Along with others who responded I agree that the next step is to
see birth/marriage/death certificates for the father and sons and what's
inscribed on their headstones in order to compare names.

Marcus, buried in Leeds, is the one whose father is named as Yosef on a
memorial document provided to me by his grandson. According to Jewishgen,
brother, Max Bird is buried in Riddrie Cemetery in Glasgow - no plot numbers
cited.

I do not have a burial plot for my husband's grandfather, Samuel Bird, who
died in 1912. But Ancestry lists his death in 1912 in Nottingham. I know
that is the right Samuel Bird. The dates are right and my father-in-law was
born in Nottingham. Does anyone out there reading this know of a likely
Jewish cemetery in that area where he might be buried?

In the 1901 census Solomon Vogel "the perhaps brother" (which becomes Fogal
by 1911) has a father named Schepsel living with him. There is no grave site
listed for Solomon Fogal,, although Jewishgen lists a headstone for his wife,
Fanny, who pre-deceased him ("mourned by Solomon" on the stone) and there's
a headstone for someone named Israel Fogal whose dates are compatible with
his oldest son listed as Isadore on secular documents like the census. Both
Fanny and Isadore are buried in Edmonton Cemetery in London.

Ancestry has a death listed for a Solomon Fogal whose dates are compatible.
The death index lists him as having died in 1941 and lists his death as
registered in Biggleswade in the county of Bedfordshire. Is there anyone out
there reading this who knows of a Jewish cemetery in that vicinity? And have
a plausible theory as to how he might have ended up there? He was 72. His
wife died in 1919. Was there a Jewish community out there? I'm thinking
maybe he was living with one of his six children. Or maybe a second wife.

I am writing this >from New York and know nothing about Jewish cemeteries in
England. You might be interested to know that this inquiry about my husband's
family all started about six months ago when I was contacted by Stan Kaye
(not a relative) in England who is volunteering to help pay tribute to
soldiers who died during World War I. Stan Kaye had come across a marker,
but not a headstone, on the grave of one of Samuel's sons, my father-in-law's
brother, Solomon Bird, who died in 1917 at the age of 19 and is buried in
Pleshet Jewish Cemetery in London. Stan Kaye arranged with the Commonwealth
Veterans group to erect a headstone and they are going to have a consecration
ceremony this coming June. They asked him to find descendants and they found
us because Solomon Bird is on my tree. Stan was excited to have found us and
I was really pleased that family history can "pay off" in the present in
unlikely ways.

Since then I have re-connected with some Birds who we know and found one we
never knew about. I found his name and an old address through research on the
internet and Stan said he'd call the synagogue in that area (St. Johns Wood)
to see if they knew him and they did. I was really skeptical that that
process would produce results. He had been very active in the synagogue, and
they forwarded an e-mail >from Stan to him in Florida where he now lives. We
plan to attend this consecration ceremony as does this new-found relative in
Florida and are trying to find as many other Bird relatives as possible to
alert them (and to meet them).

Thanks for your patience in reading this long e-mail and any insights,
information, or suggestions,

Toby MARMOR FRUTKOFF KAPLAN BIRD

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thank you for input on Schepsel/Yosef VOGEL #general

Toby Bird
 

Thank you all who weighed in privately and publicly on the likelihood that
Schepsel and Yosef might be the same person and whether it's likely that
Solomon Vogel/Fogal is the brother of my husband's grandfather Samuel Bird
and Samuel's brothers Max and Marcus Bird.

There was no concensus on that point but there was a lively and interesting
discussion. Along with others who responded I agree that the next step is to
see birth/marriage/death certificates for the father and sons and what's
inscribed on their headstones in order to compare names.

Marcus, buried in Leeds, is the one whose father is named as Yosef on a
memorial document provided to me by his grandson. According to Jewishgen,
brother, Max Bird is buried in Riddrie Cemetery in Glasgow - no plot numbers
cited.

I do not have a burial plot for my husband's grandfather, Samuel Bird, who
died in 1912. But Ancestry lists his death in 1912 in Nottingham. I know
that is the right Samuel Bird. The dates are right and my father-in-law was
born in Nottingham. Does anyone out there reading this know of a likely
Jewish cemetery in that area where he might be buried?

In the 1901 census Solomon Vogel "the perhaps brother" (which becomes Fogal
by 1911) has a father named Schepsel living with him. There is no grave site
listed for Solomon Fogal,, although Jewishgen lists a headstone for his wife,
Fanny, who pre-deceased him ("mourned by Solomon" on the stone) and there's
a headstone for someone named Israel Fogal whose dates are compatible with
his oldest son listed as Isadore on secular documents like the census. Both
Fanny and Isadore are buried in Edmonton Cemetery in London.

Ancestry has a death listed for a Solomon Fogal whose dates are compatible.
The death index lists him as having died in 1941 and lists his death as
registered in Biggleswade in the county of Bedfordshire. Is there anyone out
there reading this who knows of a Jewish cemetery in that vicinity? And have
a plausible theory as to how he might have ended up there? He was 72. His
wife died in 1919. Was there a Jewish community out there? I'm thinking
maybe he was living with one of his six children. Or maybe a second wife.

I am writing this >from New York and know nothing about Jewish cemeteries in
England. You might be interested to know that this inquiry about my husband's
family all started about six months ago when I was contacted by Stan Kaye
(not a relative) in England who is volunteering to help pay tribute to
soldiers who died during World War I. Stan Kaye had come across a marker,
but not a headstone, on the grave of one of Samuel's sons, my father-in-law's
brother, Solomon Bird, who died in 1917 at the age of 19 and is buried in
Pleshet Jewish Cemetery in London. Stan Kaye arranged with the Commonwealth
Veterans group to erect a headstone and they are going to have a consecration
ceremony this coming June. They asked him to find descendants and they found
us because Solomon Bird is on my tree. Stan was excited to have found us and
I was really pleased that family history can "pay off" in the present in
unlikely ways.

Since then I have re-connected with some Birds who we know and found one we
never knew about. I found his name and an old address through research on the
internet and Stan said he'd call the synagogue in that area (St. Johns Wood)
to see if they knew him and they did. I was really skeptical that that
process would produce results. He had been very active in the synagogue, and
they forwarded an e-mail >from Stan to him in Florida where he now lives. We
plan to attend this consecration ceremony as does this new-found relative in
Florida and are trying to find as many other Bird relatives as possible to
alert them (and to meet them).

Thanks for your patience in reading this long e-mail and any insights,
information, or suggestions,

Toby MARMOR FRUTKOFF KAPLAN BIRD

Re: Where is Uzdinsky? #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Judith Singer jsingerarslibris@... wrote on 02 feb 2015 in
soc.genealogy.jewish:

In the Birth Records for Vilna 1886-1915, several families are listed
as being >from "Uzdinsky". I cannot find anything resembling that name
in either JewishGEN's Jewish Communities or Gazetteer Databases. Does
anyone know where this is? It does not appear in any earlier records.
While "Uzdinsky" sounds like a family-name,

The JewishGen Gazetteer will give you answers if you specify:

Sounds Like — Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex

It returns: "Number of matches = 52"

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
exjxwxhannivoortATinterxnlxnet
(Please change the x'es to dots)

MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen Gazetteer may be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Where is Uzdinsky? #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Judith Singer jsingerarslibris@... wrote on 02 feb 2015 in
soc.genealogy.jewish:

In the Birth Records for Vilna 1886-1915, several families are listed
as being >from "Uzdinsky". I cannot find anything resembling that name
in either JewishGEN's Jewish Communities or Gazetteer Databases. Does
anyone know where this is? It does not appear in any earlier records.
While "Uzdinsky" sounds like a family-name,

The JewishGen Gazetteer will give you answers if you specify:

Sounds Like — Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex

It returns: "Number of matches = 52"

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
exjxwxhannivoortATinterxnlxnet
(Please change the x'es to dots)

MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen Gazetteer may be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp

A Kehila Link page for Capresti, Moldova #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

I am beginning work on a Kehila Link page for the town of Capresti.
A part of Bessarabia before World War I, then in Romania post-WWI,
next part of the Soviet Union after World War II, Capresti is now in Moldova.

I write to invite members to share with me photographs, documents,
memories, etc. related to this small town.

In addition, I am also the project coordinator for the translation
of the Capresti Yizkor book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html
and encourage you to consider donating to the translation fund
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Thank you,

Patricia


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza,
and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina,
Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT
in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of
Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of
Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY
of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.

Romania SIG #Romania A Kehila Link page for Capresti, Moldova #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

I am beginning work on a Kehila Link page for the town of Capresti.
A part of Bessarabia before World War I, then in Romania post-WWI,
next part of the Soviet Union after World War II, Capresti is now in Moldova.

I write to invite members to share with me photographs, documents,
memories, etc. related to this small town.

In addition, I am also the project coordinator for the translation
of the Capresti Yizkor book
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html
and encourage you to consider donating to the translation fund
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

Thank you,

Patricia


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza,
and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina,
Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT
in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of
Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of
Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY
of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.

Translation of signature needed #general

Robert Hanna
 

I have posted a short document. The text of the document is in Yiddish. I
have already received a good translation of the text. What I need now is a
translation of the signature. I have no idea what language it was written in.
Could be Yiddish or Russian or who knows.

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=37938

Thanks in advance for your help.

Robert Hanna
New York, NY

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond via the form in Viewmate or via email.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation of signature needed #general

Robert Hanna
 

I have posted a short document. The text of the document is in Yiddish. I
have already received a good translation of the text. What I need now is a
translation of the signature. I have no idea what language it was written in.
Could be Yiddish or Russian or who knows.

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=37938

Thanks in advance for your help.

Robert Hanna
New York, NY

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond via the form in Viewmate or via email.

Looking for WILMERSDOERFER-CUKIER in London #germany

Eberstadt privat <cpa-eberstadt@...>
 

I am looking for descendants or relatives of Emma FLEISCHMANN (1883
Altenmuhr-1940 euthanasized) and Jakob WILMERSDOERFER (died before
1940), location in Germany unknown. They had one daughter Gertrude
WILMERSDOERFER-CUKIER who lived in London until about 1992. The house at
her address seems abandoned (address of 1992 is known). Gertrude had
three siblings Hedwig, Erna, Richard W. They all may have survived Nazi
times. I represent a researcher who wants to tell the story of a
euthanasized woman (Emma W.). Any idea?

Christof Paul Antonio Eberstadt, Erlangen cpa-eberstadt@...

*Commissioner for the old Jewish Community of Erlangen*
by appointment of the board of the Erlangen Jewish Community (JKG Erlangen)

German SIG #Germany Looking for WILMERSDOERFER-CUKIER in London #germany

Eberstadt privat <cpa-eberstadt@...>
 

I am looking for descendants or relatives of Emma FLEISCHMANN (1883
Altenmuhr-1940 euthanasized) and Jakob WILMERSDOERFER (died before
1940), location in Germany unknown. They had one daughter Gertrude
WILMERSDOERFER-CUKIER who lived in London until about 1992. The house at
her address seems abandoned (address of 1992 is known). Gertrude had
three siblings Hedwig, Erna, Richard W. They all may have survived Nazi
times. I represent a researcher who wants to tell the story of a
euthanasized woman (Emma W.). Any idea?

Christof Paul Antonio Eberstadt, Erlangen cpa-eberstadt@...

*Commissioner for the old Jewish Community of Erlangen*
by appointment of the board of the Erlangen Jewish Community (JKG Erlangen)

Re: Name change paperwork in Bavaria? #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Moderator note: Inherited name adoptions by Jews in Germany
have been discussed very often in this forum. GerSIG friend
Dr. Wolfgang Fritzsche has created and regularly updates lists
of name adoptions by town at his AHB website. To find GerSIG
messages on the topic search the SIG archives for NALDEX, 1808,
"name then adoption" and variations. Links to both the JGDG
and the separate SIG archive search pages are at the bottom of
the "List Manager" page at JewishGen. Link to that appears below.
==============>
Lin:
Name-change documentation? That's a big question! How big? Well, almost
a decade ago, GerSIG undertook the creation of a Germany-wide database
of such information. So far we've done Prussia and one or two other
places (about 16,000 names); and the project leader hereby promises to
add more soon. (No, really.)

The reason it's taking so long is that the documentation of this kind of
thing took so many forms. Prussia and a few other places actually
published lists of changes. The French (which includes Germany west of
the Rhine) made a register in each town, but never gathered them
centrally. I'm told that there are over 80 such registers for the
Palatinate alone, but I only know the location of a handful.

Things were much worse in places like Bavaria, where Schutz (protection,
i.e., official permission to reside, etc.) was issued by all manner of
different authorities including local nobility and even entities like
universities. We have something that's equivalent to a complete register
for Middle Franconia (the region around Nuremberg); and Dirk Rosenstock
of Wuerzburg has done heroic work in gathering up the individual
registers >from Lower Franconia (the region around Wuerzburg). Both of
these things date to 1817.

If the situation in Bavarian Swabia (the region you're asking about) is
anything like the one in Lower Franconia, it may take a survey of
state-run and private archives all over the region. (Some archives of
the nobility are still held by descendants!) Thus, in the general case,
you need to ask the researcher directly where this tidbit of information
came >from and proceed >from there.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 2/1/2015 Lin Herz lin2@... wrote:
My Kleinerdlingen / Noerdlingen BUEHLERs may have originally come from
Schopfloch I was told by a researcher, and perhaps originally had the
name Schweizer. I was told this name change occurred in 1813 by a
researcher but he offers no paper trail (proof). Does anyone know where
would I find (if any exists) paperwork of name changes. I have
"find-a-grave" and Wallerstein Cemetery Grave list information on my
BUEHLERS going back to 1779. Or who to ask?

German SIG #Germany Re: Name change paperwork in Bavaria? #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Moderator note: Inherited name adoptions by Jews in Germany
have been discussed very often in this forum. GerSIG friend
Dr. Wolfgang Fritzsche has created and regularly updates lists
of name adoptions by town at his AHB website. To find GerSIG
messages on the topic search the SIG archives for NALDEX, 1808,
"name then adoption" and variations. Links to both the JGDG
and the separate SIG archive search pages are at the bottom of
the "List Manager" page at JewishGen. Link to that appears below.
==============>
Lin:
Name-change documentation? That's a big question! How big? Well, almost
a decade ago, GerSIG undertook the creation of a Germany-wide database
of such information. So far we've done Prussia and one or two other
places (about 16,000 names); and the project leader hereby promises to
add more soon. (No, really.)

The reason it's taking so long is that the documentation of this kind of
thing took so many forms. Prussia and a few other places actually
published lists of changes. The French (which includes Germany west of
the Rhine) made a register in each town, but never gathered them
centrally. I'm told that there are over 80 such registers for the
Palatinate alone, but I only know the location of a handful.

Things were much worse in places like Bavaria, where Schutz (protection,
i.e., official permission to reside, etc.) was issued by all manner of
different authorities including local nobility and even entities like
universities. We have something that's equivalent to a complete register
for Middle Franconia (the region around Nuremberg); and Dirk Rosenstock
of Wuerzburg has done heroic work in gathering up the individual
registers >from Lower Franconia (the region around Wuerzburg). Both of
these things date to 1817.

If the situation in Bavarian Swabia (the region you're asking about) is
anything like the one in Lower Franconia, it may take a survey of
state-run and private archives all over the region. (Some archives of
the nobility are still held by descendants!) Thus, in the general case,
you need to ask the researcher directly where this tidbit of information
came >from and proceed >from there.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 2/1/2015 Lin Herz lin2@... wrote:
My Kleinerdlingen / Noerdlingen BUEHLERs may have originally come from
Schopfloch I was told by a researcher, and perhaps originally had the
name Schweizer. I was told this name change occurred in 1813 by a
researcher but he offers no paper trail (proof). Does anyone know where
would I find (if any exists) paperwork of name changes. I have
"find-a-grave" and Wallerstein Cemetery Grave list information on my
BUEHLERS going back to 1779. Or who to ask?

Yizkor Book Project, January 2015 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld
 

Shalom,

Last week, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day was commemorated,
marking 70 years since Auschwitz was liberated of by the Allies. As we grow
further and further away >from the events of the Holocaust, so does our need
grow to save every scrap of memory of the communities and the people that
were taken >from us forever. The Yizkor Book Project mission of disseminating
information on the lost communities freely available has continued in the
past month involving the translation of the original Yiddish and Hebrew
books into English, but not only... You will certainly notice below that
some of the additions and updates this past month are in Hebrew and Polish.
On one hand, Yiddish sections of a number of books have been translated into
Hebrew, making this material accessible to those whose mother tongue is
Hebrew and are less comfortable with English and on the other hand,
translations have been prepared in Polish for the people of Poland who
quite often have little information on the events that took place in their
own country during World War Two and are frequently thirsty for such
information.

Other than that, it was a milestone month for the Yizkor Books in Print
Project with no less than three books becoming available during January.
Congratulations to the volunteers behind this remarkable achievement! The
books are:

- Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and Vicinity
- Dubossary Memorial Book
- The Book of Klobucko; In Memory of a Martyred Community

As time progresses, we are seeing more and more correspondence >from people
interested in obtaining hard copies of the Yizkor Book translations. Whilst
the translations continue to be freely available online in the Yizkor Book
Project, there is a growing interest in seeing the translations in a
concrete, "touchable" format on people's bookshelves. The only thing here is
that in order to reach the publishing stage, we obviously need to complete
the translation of the books beforehand. This generally requires quite a
deal of financial report and, as always, if you feel strongly about seeing
the books translated and are able to assist in any way, your donations would
be very much appreciated and perhaps, in the end, would mean you seeing the
book you supported sitting proudly on your bookshelf at home.

If you wish to learn more about the Yizkor Book in Print Project or how you
can support one of the Yizkor Book Translation projects, please see the
links at the end of this message.

Lastly, I would like to point out a new page which has been added to the YB
Project called Yizkor Book Insights at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybinsights.html . The first of the articles
which appear here have been kindly donated by Shalom Bronstein and Dr. Ida
Selavan Schwarcz and I'm sure you'll find their insights into Yizkor books
particularly enlightening. Hopefully, more of these type of articles will be
added with time.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Eisiskes, Lithuania (Ejszyszki, its History and Destruction)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Eisiskes/Eisiskes.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Memorial Book of Krzemieniec)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets4/kremenetsh.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Yizkor book of Luboml)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lyuboml1/Lyubomlh.html [Hebrew]

- Sosnove, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ludvipol1/ludvipolh.html [Hebrew]

Added 10 entries:

- Bogdan Voda, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar185.html

- Birsana, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar177.html

- Nanesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194.html

- Oncesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar193.html

- Poienile Izei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar192b.html

- Salistea de Sus, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar178.html

- Slatina, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194b.html

- Sieu, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar183.html

- Strimatra, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar181.html

- Valen, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar195.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Czenstochov; a new supplement to the book
"Czenstochover Yidn")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Nowy Zmigrod, Poland (Halbow near Nowy Zmigrod)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_zmigrod1/nowy_zmigrod1.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ryki, Poland (A Memorial to the Community of Ryki, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ryki/rykp000.html [Polish]

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Skarzysko-Kamienna, Poland (The Yischor book in memoriam of the Jewish
community of Skarzysko and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Skarzysko/Skarzysko.html

- Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/pinkas_slovakia.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wlodawa, Poland (Yizkor book in memory of Vlodava and region)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wlodawa/wlodowa.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

Belarus SIG #Belarus Yizkor Book Project, January 2015 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld
 

Shalom,

Last week, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day was commemorated,
marking 70 years since Auschwitz was liberated of by the Allies. As we grow
further and further away >from the events of the Holocaust, so does our need
grow to save every scrap of memory of the communities and the people that
were taken >from us forever. The Yizkor Book Project mission of disseminating
information on the lost communities freely available has continued in the
past month involving the translation of the original Yiddish and Hebrew
books into English, but not only... You will certainly notice below that
some of the additions and updates this past month are in Hebrew and Polish.
On one hand, Yiddish sections of a number of books have been translated into
Hebrew, making this material accessible to those whose mother tongue is
Hebrew and are less comfortable with English and on the other hand,
translations have been prepared in Polish for the people of Poland who
quite often have little information on the events that took place in their
own country during World War Two and are frequently thirsty for such
information.

Other than that, it was a milestone month for the Yizkor Books in Print
Project with no less than three books becoming available during January.
Congratulations to the volunteers behind this remarkable achievement! The
books are:

- Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and Vicinity
- Dubossary Memorial Book
- The Book of Klobucko; In Memory of a Martyred Community

As time progresses, we are seeing more and more correspondence >from people
interested in obtaining hard copies of the Yizkor Book translations. Whilst
the translations continue to be freely available online in the Yizkor Book
Project, there is a growing interest in seeing the translations in a
concrete, "touchable" format on people's bookshelves. The only thing here is
that in order to reach the publishing stage, we obviously need to complete
the translation of the books beforehand. This generally requires quite a
deal of financial report and, as always, if you feel strongly about seeing
the books translated and are able to assist in any way, your donations would
be very much appreciated and perhaps, in the end, would mean you seeing the
book you supported sitting proudly on your bookshelf at home.

If you wish to learn more about the Yizkor Book in Print Project or how you
can support one of the Yizkor Book Translation projects, please see the
links at the end of this message.

Lastly, I would like to point out a new page which has been added to the YB
Project called Yizkor Book Insights at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybinsights.html . The first of the articles
which appear here have been kindly donated by Shalom Bronstein and Dr. Ida
Selavan Schwarcz and I'm sure you'll find their insights into Yizkor books
particularly enlightening. Hopefully, more of these type of articles will be
added with time.

Now to facts and figures for January.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Eisiskes, Lithuania (Ejszyszki, its History and Destruction)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Eisiskes/Eisiskes.html

- Kremenets', Ukraine (Memorial Book of Krzemieniec)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets4/kremenetsh.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Yizkor book of Luboml)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Lyuboml1/Lyubomlh.html [Hebrew]

- Sosnove, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ludvipol1/ludvipolh.html [Hebrew]

Added 10 entries:

- Bogdan Voda, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar185.html

- Birsana, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar177.html

- Nanesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194.html

- Oncesti, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar193.html

- Poienile Izei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar192b.html

- Salistea de Sus, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar178.html

- Slatina, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar194b.html

- Sieu, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar183.html

- Strimatra, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar181.html

- Valen, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar195.html

We have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Belki, Ukraine (The Bilker Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/belki/belki.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Briceni, Moldova (Brichany: its Jewry in the first half of our century)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Brichany/Brichany.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Czenstochov; a new supplement to the book
"Czenstochover Yidn")
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa/Czestochowa.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Krasnik, Poland (Book of Krasnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/krasnik/krasnik.html

- Krosno, Poland (Krosno by the Wislok River)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krosno/Krosno.html

- Lithuania (Lite) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lita/lita.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Nowy Zmigrod, Poland (Halbow near Nowy Zmigrod)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nowy_zmigrod1/nowy_zmigrod1.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Ryki, Poland (A Memorial to the Community of Ryki, Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ryki/rykp000.html [Polish]

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Siedlce, Poland (The Jews in Siedlce 1850-1945)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Siedlce3/Siedlce3.html

- Skarzysko-Kamienna, Poland (The Yischor book in memoriam of the Jewish
community of Skarzysko and its surroundings)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Skarzysko/Skarzysko.html

- Slovakia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_slovakia/pinkas_slovakia.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Turka, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Turka on the Stryj and
Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/turka/turka.html

- Wlodawa, Poland (Yizkor book in memory of Vlodava and region)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wlodawa/wlodowa.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

New material added to the databases #hungary

ethnoca@...
 

I am delighted to announce that another batch of transcribed material, some 14 500
entries, have been added to the Hungarian databases. The list includes the
following places: Diosgyor(BMD), Heo-Csaba(BMD) and Belso-Bocs(B) >from Borsod
county, Gonc(D) >from Abauj-Torna, Bethlen(BD) and Dees(BMD) >from Szolnok-Doboka,
and finally Torda(BMD) >from Torda-Aranyos county. Although the Intro page is yet
to be updated, the registers are already in the databases, ready to be explored.

I am also happy to report that we are in the process of aquiring the vital records
for all of Bihar county.


Also, Roger Adler is initiating a project of having the tomb stones photographed in
the Velence cemetery in Nagyvarad. It is going to be a major job, since a lot of
them are covered by overgrown vines and those need to be cleared off before the
monuments can be photographed. He already graciously put forward some of his own
money towards the clean-up part of the project, but any further bit of donation
from whoever is interested in the photographing of the tomb stones would be very
welcome. If you wish to do so, you can specify on the JewishGen donation page
that it should be directed towards the Nagyvarad Velence cemetery project [Note: As soon as
the project is added to the JewishGen Generosity page].

It goes without saying that we always welcome new volunteers who would not mind
donating a bit of their time to become part of our team of much appreciated
transcribers and indexers.

Sarah Feuerstein
Hungarian Vital Records Coordinator

Moderator: Thanks to Sarah and her devoted volunteers for augmenting the Hungary
database, which continues to be one of JewishGen's largest and most useful for
Hungarian family research. Contributions to the Hungarian SIG General Fund help us
to increase our resources and support programs of interest to those researching their
Jewish families >from greater Hungary.

Hungary SIG #Hungary New material added to the databases #hungary

ethnoca@...
 

I am delighted to announce that another batch of transcribed material, some 14 500
entries, have been added to the Hungarian databases. The list includes the
following places: Diosgyor(BMD), Heo-Csaba(BMD) and Belso-Bocs(B) >from Borsod
county, Gonc(D) >from Abauj-Torna, Bethlen(BD) and Dees(BMD) >from Szolnok-Doboka,
and finally Torda(BMD) >from Torda-Aranyos county. Although the Intro page is yet
to be updated, the registers are already in the databases, ready to be explored.

I am also happy to report that we are in the process of aquiring the vital records
for all of Bihar county.


Also, Roger Adler is initiating a project of having the tomb stones photographed in
the Velence cemetery in Nagyvarad. It is going to be a major job, since a lot of
them are covered by overgrown vines and those need to be cleared off before the
monuments can be photographed. He already graciously put forward some of his own
money towards the clean-up part of the project, but any further bit of donation
from whoever is interested in the photographing of the tomb stones would be very
welcome. If you wish to do so, you can specify on the JewishGen donation page
that it should be directed towards the Nagyvarad Velence cemetery project [Note: As soon as
the project is added to the JewishGen Generosity page].

It goes without saying that we always welcome new volunteers who would not mind
donating a bit of their time to become part of our team of much appreciated
transcribers and indexers.

Sarah Feuerstein
Hungarian Vital Records Coordinator

Moderator: Thanks to Sarah and her devoted volunteers for augmenting the Hungary
database, which continues to be one of JewishGen's largest and most useful for
Hungarian family research. Contributions to the Hungarian SIG General Fund help us
to increase our resources and support programs of interest to those researching their
Jewish families >from greater Hungary.