Date   

Help needed translation from Russian #lodz #poland

michel becker
 

Hi Genners
can someone help translating >from Russian the Birth certficate of my
grand-mother and one of her sister both born in Lodz.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D7692

and

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D7693

Thank-you in advance

Best regards

Michel BECKER
Paris, FRANCE
Researching
in LODZ (POLAND) BEKER, LEBENZON, ROZENTAL, LENCZYCKI
in KOLO (Poland) LENCZYCKI, KUCZINSKI, RAICHERT, ROZENTAL, BORNSTAJN


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Help needed translation from Russian #lodz #poland

michel becker
 

Hi Genners
can someone help translating >from Russian the Birth certficate of my
grand-mother and one of her sister both born in Lodz.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D7692

and

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D7693

Thank-you in advance

Best regards

Michel BECKER
Paris, FRANCE
Researching
in LODZ (POLAND) BEKER, LEBENZON, ROZENTAL, LENCZYCKI
in KOLO (Poland) LENCZYCKI, KUCZINSKI, RAICHERT, ROZENTAL, BORNSTAJN


gymnazium #lithuania

LEVRAPHAEL@...
 

There would have been more than one gymnazium, I imagine.

I think my mother went to the Sophie Gurevitsch Gymnazium.

Lev Raphael
--
http://www.levraphael.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania gymnazium #lithuania

LEVRAPHAEL@...
 

There would have been more than one gymnazium, I imagine.

I think my mother went to the Sophie Gurevitsch Gymnazium.

Lev Raphael
--
http://www.levraphael.com


VRI Website additions - Surname lists by town #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vital Records Indexing Project has added lists of unique surnames found
in the vital records for several towns to the VRI website. These towns are
as follows:

Jonava, Moletai, Pasvalys, Pumpenai, Rasein, and Shirvint

In the case of Jonava and Pasvalys, these lists are only a beginning since
the surname lists are derived >from a subset of the vital records.

Additional surname lists will be added as additional records are translated.

Please visit the VRI website at http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x and check
the appropriate page for your town.


Joel Ratner


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania VRI Website additions - Surname lists by town #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The Vital Records Indexing Project has added lists of unique surnames found
in the vital records for several towns to the VRI website. These towns are
as follows:

Jonava, Moletai, Pasvalys, Pumpenai, Rasein, and Shirvint

In the case of Jonava and Pasvalys, these lists are only a beginning since
the surname lists are derived >from a subset of the vital records.

Additional surname lists will be added as additional records are translated.

Please visit the VRI website at http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x and check
the appropriate page for your town.


Joel Ratner


Recording the birth of twins on a birth certificate (and death) #poland

Ron Herrmann <ron_herrmann@...>
 

I recently got a copy of a birth certificate written
in an old-dialect of Russian. A professional
translated it to me. The full translation is below.

I and the Translator are both puzzled about one word
in it: "[father] presented [to] us infant [of] male
sex having-been-born in Sedlets twenty fifth [of]
August / sixth [of] September/ [of] th- is year at
six o'clock [of] morning >from TWINS, >from wife his
Khana Meita”

It says “>from twins”.

And indeed, the next record in the archive is for the
twin brother.

However, we know the the twin brother died when he
about 4 years old.

In the image of the birth record for twin brother,
someone put a big X on it (crossed it out), I guess,
to denote that the record is not valid [anymore].

We also see the Death Notice in the arcives for the
twin brother.

Question: Is that how they handled death notices back
then? Finding the birth record, crossing it out and
creating a new record for the death? If so, most
records shoul be crossed out by now...

Full translation:

1. [It] occurred in City Sedlets first/thirteenth/
[of] September thousand ei-
2. ght-hundred eighty eighth year at eleven o'clock
[of] morning appeared
3. Elya Ber Rogovykamen twenty seven years
bookbinder before wit-
4. nesses Khaskel Pasolnik fifty years trader and
5. Moshk Rafal fifty eight years trader, residents
[of] Cit-
6. y Sedlets presented [to] us infant [of] male sex
having-been-
7. born in Sedlets twenty fifth [of] August / sixth
[of] September/ [of] th-
8. is year at six o'clock [of] morning >from twins,
from wife his Khana
9. Meita born Spektor twenty six years: [To] which
during
10. circumcision was-given name Pelta Binem
Rogovykamen / Pelta Binem
11. Rogowykamien (latin)/_ Act this per reading [to]
those-present [by] us
12. and [by] them was-signed __ Maintaining Books
[of] Civil Status
13. Squiggle
14. Elya Berik Rogovikamen # Khaskel Paselnik
(Yiddish?) Moszk Rafal (latin)

Ron Herrmann, Bedminster, NJ, USA
Researching: Reichenbach, Rogowykamien, Spector,
Sonneshine/Zonszajn, Raizman around
Siedlce/Shadlitz, Poland.


JRI Poland #Poland Recording the birth of twins on a birth certificate (and death) #poland

Ron Herrmann <ron_herrmann@...>
 

I recently got a copy of a birth certificate written
in an old-dialect of Russian. A professional
translated it to me. The full translation is below.

I and the Translator are both puzzled about one word
in it: "[father] presented [to] us infant [of] male
sex having-been-born in Sedlets twenty fifth [of]
August / sixth [of] September/ [of] th- is year at
six o'clock [of] morning >from TWINS, >from wife his
Khana Meita”

It says “>from twins”.

And indeed, the next record in the archive is for the
twin brother.

However, we know the the twin brother died when he
about 4 years old.

In the image of the birth record for twin brother,
someone put a big X on it (crossed it out), I guess,
to denote that the record is not valid [anymore].

We also see the Death Notice in the arcives for the
twin brother.

Question: Is that how they handled death notices back
then? Finding the birth record, crossing it out and
creating a new record for the death? If so, most
records shoul be crossed out by now...

Full translation:

1. [It] occurred in City Sedlets first/thirteenth/
[of] September thousand ei-
2. ght-hundred eighty eighth year at eleven o'clock
[of] morning appeared
3. Elya Ber Rogovykamen twenty seven years
bookbinder before wit-
4. nesses Khaskel Pasolnik fifty years trader and
5. Moshk Rafal fifty eight years trader, residents
[of] Cit-
6. y Sedlets presented [to] us infant [of] male sex
having-been-
7. born in Sedlets twenty fifth [of] August / sixth
[of] September/ [of] th-
8. is year at six o'clock [of] morning >from twins,
from wife his Khana
9. Meita born Spektor twenty six years: [To] which
during
10. circumcision was-given name Pelta Binem
Rogovykamen / Pelta Binem
11. Rogowykamien (latin)/_ Act this per reading [to]
those-present [by] us
12. and [by] them was-signed __ Maintaining Books
[of] Civil Status
13. Squiggle
14. Elya Berik Rogovikamen # Khaskel Paselnik
(Yiddish?) Moszk Rafal (latin)

Ron Herrmann, Bedminster, NJ, USA
Researching: Reichenbach, Rogowykamien, Spector,
Sonneshine/Zonszajn, Raizman around
Siedlce/Shadlitz, Poland.


Re: Shanghai 1934-1941: persons registered at the Polish consulate #general

Mark Halpern
 

As pointed out on the Library of Congress website, this Register was
acquired in 1992. An article about these Shanghai Consular records
appeared in Avotaynu in the Summer 1994 edition, Volume X, No.2, page
23. This article entitled "Consular Records in Shanghai about Jewish
Refugees" was written by Jonathan Goldstein, Professor of East Asian
History at the State University of West Georgia and the researcher who
acquired the copy >from the Polish Consulate in Shanghai in November
1992.

A couple of years ago, JRI-Poland acquired a full copy of the Shanghai
Polish Consular register >from Sino-Judaic Institute
in Palo Alto, California and proceeded slowly to index the Jewish (and
possibly Jewish) records included in this collection. Of the 1474
entries over the period January 19, 1934 through December 13, 1941, 846
or 57% were Jewish.

Two incidents appear to precipitate a good deal of the visits to the
Shanghai Consulate by Jews. The first was the August 1937 Battle of
Shanghai, where Japan began its full scale efforts to conquer China. The
second was in December 1941 following the Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor. In the register are found many entries for people who received
"Sugihara" passports in Kovno including those >from Mir Yeshiva.

The indexing is almost complete and will be compiled in database format
and added to the JRI-Poland database in 2006. The index will include:
* Registration Number
* Date entered in register
* Surname
* Maiden Name (if provided)
* Given Names
* Place of Birth as Written
* Place of Birth - Current Name (if different)
* Current Country of Place of Birth
* Date of Birth
* Marital Status

In addition the actual register includes Profession, Address in Poland,
Address in the Consular Region, Documents submitted to Register Name and
Date of Birth, Data on Wife and Children, Passport Expiration Date, and
Other Notes.

During the interwar period covered by this register, Poland was a large
country that included territories now part of Lithuania, Belarus, and
Ukraine. In addition, many Polish Jews living in Germany had Polish
nationality. This database includes people previously living in the
following current countries: Austria, Belarus, Bosnia, China, Czech
Republic, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia,
and Ukraine.

While we continue to complete the indexing, I would be happy to provide
the preliminary index information to anyone who suspects that their
ancestor was in Shanghai during the 1934-1941 period and whose surname
appears on the list at the Library of Congress website at
www.loc.gov/rr/european/polref/polrefindex.html.

Mark Halpern
mark@halpern.com

----- Original Message ----- >
Subject: Shanghai 1934-1941: persons registered at the Polish consulate
From: "Logan J. Kleinwaks" <kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2006 15:40:27 -0500

New on the Library of Congress' website at
www.loc.gov/rr/european/polref/polrefindex.html is an "Index to Ledger
listing in handwriting persons registered at the Polish consulate in
Shanghai, 1934-1941, on the basis of documents issued by Polish
authorities." According to the website:

"In addition to personal names, the register provides the following
categories of information: date of registration; profession; religion;
place and date of birth; marital status; permanent address in Poland and
address of next of kin [rarely provided]; place of residence in the
consular district; documents on the basis of which the person is
registered [generally, passport]; names and year and place of birth of
wife and children; passport expiration date; comments [e.g., 'emigrated
to America,'
'returned to Poland,' 'died']. Roughly 60% of the registrants are
identified as Jewish..."


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Shanghai 1934-1941: persons registered at the Polish consulate #poland

Mark Halpern
 

As pointed out on the Library of Congress website, this Register was
acquired in 1992. An article about these Shanghai Consular records
appeared in Avotaynu in the Summer 1994 edition, Volume X, No.2, page
23. This article entitled "Consular Records in Shanghai about Jewish
Refugees" was written by Jonathan Goldstein, Professor of East Asian
History at the State University of West Georgia and the researcher who
acquired the copy >from the Polish Consulate in Shanghai in November
1992.

A couple of years ago, JRI-Poland acquired a full copy of the Shanghai
Polish Consular register >from Sino-Judaic Institute
in Palo Alto, California and proceeded slowly to index the Jewish (and
possibly Jewish) records included in this collection. Of the 1474
entries over the period January 19, 1934 through December 13, 1941, 846
or 57% were Jewish.

Two incidents appear to precipitate a good deal of the visits to the
Shanghai Consulate by Jews. The first was the August 1937 Battle of
Shanghai, where Japan began its full scale efforts to conquer China. The
second was in December 1941 following the Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor. In the register are found many entries for people who received
"Sugihara" passports in Kovno including those >from Mir Yeshiva.

The indexing is almost complete and will be compiled in database format
and added to the JRI-Poland database in 2006. The index will include:
* Registration Number
* Date entered in register
* Surname
* Maiden Name (if provided)
* Given Names
* Place of Birth as Written
* Place of Birth - Current Name (if different)
* Current Country of Place of Birth
* Date of Birth
* Marital Status

In addition the actual register includes Profession, Address in Poland,
Address in the Consular Region, Documents submitted to Register Name and
Date of Birth, Data on Wife and Children, Passport Expiration Date, and
Other Notes.

During the interwar period covered by this register, Poland was a large
country that included territories now part of Lithuania, Belarus, and
Ukraine. In addition, many Polish Jews living in Germany had Polish
nationality. This database includes people previously living in the
following current countries: Austria, Belarus, Bosnia, China, Czech
Republic, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia,
and Ukraine.

While we continue to complete the indexing, I would be happy to provide
the preliminary index information to anyone who suspects that their
ancestor was in Shanghai during the 1934-1941 period and whose surname
appears on the list at the Library of Congress website at
www.loc.gov/rr/european/polref/polrefindex.html.

Mark Halpern
mark@halpern.com

----- Original Message ----- >
Subject: Shanghai 1934-1941: persons registered at the Polish consulate
From: "Logan J. Kleinwaks" <kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu>
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2006 15:40:27 -0500

New on the Library of Congress' website at
www.loc.gov/rr/european/polref/polrefindex.html is an "Index to Ledger
listing in handwriting persons registered at the Polish consulate in
Shanghai, 1934-1941, on the basis of documents issued by Polish
authorities." According to the website:

"In addition to personal names, the register provides the following
categories of information: date of registration; profession; religion;
place and date of birth; marital status; permanent address in Poland and
address of next of kin [rarely provided]; place of residence in the
consular district; documents on the basis of which the person is
registered [generally, passport]; names and year and place of birth of
wife and children; passport expiration date; comments [e.g., 'emigrated
to America,'
'returned to Poland,' 'died']. Roughly 60% of the registrants are
identified as Jewish..."


Re: Address in Budapest #hungary

GilaMiriam Chait <gilamiriamchait@...>
 

'alk' stands for 'alkalmazott', meaning employee.

Gila Miriam Chait,
Manchester, England


--- peter bakos <pgbakos@hotmail.com> wrote:

Nev: Lorber Izsak
Foglalkozas: izr. hitkozs. alk.
Kerulet: III.
Cim: Zichy-u. 9.

This means

Name: Isak Lorber
Occupation: Works in the Jewish Community (as what
is not clear as the
abbreviation alk doesn't tell me anything I can find
in the dictionary.
District: III (This is on the Buda side, actually
Obuda)
Address: 9 Zichy street This street has been
renamed, I believe. The
Zichy family owned parts of Obuda and invited the
Jewish community to locate
themselves here following the liberation of Budapest
from the Turks by the
Austrians. As the Ottomans had been tolerant of the
Jewish faith, some in
the Austrian establishment sought to punish them.

Peter Bakos


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Address in Budapest #hungary

GilaMiriam Chait <gilamiriamchait@...>
 

'alk' stands for 'alkalmazott', meaning employee.

Gila Miriam Chait,
Manchester, England


--- peter bakos <pgbakos@hotmail.com> wrote:

Nev: Lorber Izsak
Foglalkozas: izr. hitkozs. alk.
Kerulet: III.
Cim: Zichy-u. 9.

This means

Name: Isak Lorber
Occupation: Works in the Jewish Community (as what
is not clear as the
abbreviation alk doesn't tell me anything I can find
in the dictionary.
District: III (This is on the Buda side, actually
Obuda)
Address: 9 Zichy street This street has been
renamed, I believe. The
Zichy family owned parts of Obuda and invited the
Jewish community to locate
themselves here following the liberation of Budapest
from the Turks by the
Austrians. As the Ottomans had been tolerant of the
Jewish faith, some in
the Austrian establishment sought to punish them.

Peter Bakos


Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book
Project added seven new books, four new entries,
and nine updates. All translations are indexed
at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *
Bialystok * Nowogrodek districts:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research
paper by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our
ancestral towns we need contributions of
translated material or money to support hiring
professional translators. So consider
volunteering to translate material >from your
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money
to the fundraising projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=23.
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital
for the continued growth and development of this
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book
Project added seven new books, four new entries,
and nine updates. All translations are indexed
at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *
Bialystok * Nowogrodek districts:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research
paper by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our
ancestral towns we need contributions of
translated material or money to support hiring
professional translators. So consider
volunteering to translate material >from your
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money
to the fundraising projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=23.
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital
for the continued growth and development of this
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #romania

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book
Project added seven new books, four new entries,
and nine updates. All translations are indexed
at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *
Bialystok * Nowogrodek districts:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research
paper by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our
ancestral towns we need contributions of
translated material or money to support hiring
professional translators. So consider
volunteering to translate material >from your
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money
to the fundraising projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=23.
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital
for the continued growth and development of this
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book=20
Project added seven new books, four new entries,=20
and nine updates. All translations are indexed=20
at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,=20
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *=20
Bialystok * Nowogr=F3dek districts:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html=20
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents=20
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research=20
paper by Robin O'Neil:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html=20
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I)

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator=20
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our=20
ancestral towns we need contributions of=20
translated material or money to support hiring=20
professional translators. So consider=20
volunteering to translate material >from your=20
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money=20
to the fundraising projects listed at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=
23.=20
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the=20
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital=20
for the continued growth and development of this=20
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from=20
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit=20
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Romania SIG #Romania Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #romania

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book
Project added seven new books, four new entries,
and nine updates. All translations are indexed
at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *
Bialystok * Nowogrodek districts:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research
paper by Robin O'Neil:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our
ancestral towns we need contributions of
translated material or money to support hiring
professional translators. So consider
volunteering to translate material >from your
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money
to the fundraising projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=23.
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital
for the continued growth and development of this
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book=20
Project added seven new books, four new entries,=20
and nine updates. All translations are indexed=20
at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,=20
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *=20
Bialystok * Nowogr=F3dek districts:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html=20
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents=20
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research=20
paper by Robin O'Neil:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html=20
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I)

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator=20
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our=20
ancestral towns we need contributions of=20
translated material or money to support hiring=20
professional translators. So consider=20
volunteering to translate material >from your=20
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money=20
to the fundraising projects listed at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=
23.=20
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the=20
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital=20
for the continued growth and development of this=20
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from=20
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit=20
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book=20
Project added seven new books, four new entries,=20
and nine updates. All translations are indexed=20
at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,=20
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *=20
Bialystok * Nowogr=F3dek districts:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html=20
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents=20
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research=20
paper by Robin O'Neil:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html=20
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I)

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator=20
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our=20
ancestral towns we need contributions of=20
translated material or money to support hiring=20
professional translators. So consider=20
volunteering to translate material >from your=20
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money=20
to the fundraising projects listed at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=
23.=20
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the=20
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital=20
for the continued growth and development of this=20
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from=20
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit=20
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Project Report for March 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of March 2006 the Yizkor Book=20
Project added seven new books, four new entries,=20
and nine updates. All translations are indexed=20
at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,=20
and new material can be identified by flags.

New books:

-Belz, Ukraine
-Bialystok, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, volume VIII: Vilna *=20
Bialystok * Nowogr=F3dek districts:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pinkas_poland8.html=20
(indexed under Regions). Only Table of Contents=20
is available now
-Poland and her Jews 1941-1944: new research=20
paper by Robin O'Neil:=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/poland/poland.html=20
(indexed under Miscellaneous)
-Sadagora, Ukraine: The Jewish Vatican in Sadagora, Volume I)

New entries:

-Abony, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Albert-Irsa, Hungary: Pinkas HaKehillot Hungary
-Rava Ruska, Ukraine: Pinkas Polin, volume II
-Sokolow Podlaski, Poland: Pinkas Polin, volume VII

Updates:

-Bolekhov, Ukraine
-Jewish Music in Poland
-Lyakhovichi, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Podgaytsy, Ukraine
-Rzeszow, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Vysokoye, Belarus

Please remember that genealogy is not a spectator=20
sport. In order to expland our knowledge of our=20
ancestral towns we need contributions of=20
translated material or money to support hiring=20
professional translators. So consider=20
volunteering to translate material >from your=20
ancestral shtetl's yizkor book or donating money=20
to the fundraising projects listed at=20
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=3D=
23.=20
Making a contribution to JewishGen to support the=20
infrastrucure of the Yizkor Book Project is vital=20
for the continued growth and development of this=20
project.

Contact me privately if you can translate from=20
Hebrew and/or Yiddish and are willing to submit=20
translations to the project.

Hag sameach Pesach.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org