Date   

Re: Explanation of "Impf-Schein" on family documents #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Michael,
(the correct spelling is: Wiederimpfung)
these are vaccination or re-vaccination certificates

with kind regards Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de>


German SIG #Germany Re: Explanation of "Impf-Schein" on family documents #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Michael,
(the correct spelling is: Wiederimpfung)
these are vaccination or re-vaccination certificates

with kind regards Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de>


Re: commemorative markers in Germany - stolpersteine (stumbling blocks) #germany

Dottie Miller
 

MODERATOR NOTE: The messages on this topic already posted to this list
contain many Internet links to sources of further information. It is clear that
Stolpersteine and other memorials to murdered Jews have been placed in many
cities and towns. There is no further need to cite those places in our list.

For groups and individuals such as the one mentioned below, memorial placement
is an ongoing effort. Sometimes project members contact us for help locating
survivors of deported families. These inquiries are always welcome here. But more
posts about specific towns where stolpersteine have been placed aren't needed.
MODERATOR 1 ==========>

Celia Male's question regarding the existence of memorial plaques
[stolpersteine (stumbling blocks)] imbedded in walkways in Germany beyond
Berlin prompts me to add that there are such plaques in at least one small
town in southwestern Germany.

There is a woman, Christina Weiblen, who has written about the
Jewish community that was part of Eichstetten, Baden-Wurttemberg,
Germany, and spearheaded a project to place such markers in front of all
the buildings in that town where Jews once lived before being deported
to concentration camps in 1940.

She gave a tour of Jewish Eichstetten to a cousin and me, descendants of 19th C.
Eichstetten Jews. This visit was four years ago. There may be more such
markers by now.

Dottie J. Miller San Antonio, TX <dottiem@samcrc.com>


German SIG #Germany Re: commemorative markers in Germany - stolpersteine (stumbling blocks) #germany

Dottie Miller
 

MODERATOR NOTE: The messages on this topic already posted to this list
contain many Internet links to sources of further information. It is clear that
Stolpersteine and other memorials to murdered Jews have been placed in many
cities and towns. There is no further need to cite those places in our list.

For groups and individuals such as the one mentioned below, memorial placement
is an ongoing effort. Sometimes project members contact us for help locating
survivors of deported families. These inquiries are always welcome here. But more
posts about specific towns where stolpersteine have been placed aren't needed.
MODERATOR 1 ==========>

Celia Male's question regarding the existence of memorial plaques
[stolpersteine (stumbling blocks)] imbedded in walkways in Germany beyond
Berlin prompts me to add that there are such plaques in at least one small
town in southwestern Germany.

There is a woman, Christina Weiblen, who has written about the
Jewish community that was part of Eichstetten, Baden-Wurttemberg,
Germany, and spearheaded a project to place such markers in front of all
the buildings in that town where Jews once lived before being deported
to concentration camps in 1940.

She gave a tour of Jewish Eichstetten to a cousin and me, descendants of 19th C.
Eichstetten Jews. This visit was four years ago. There may be more such
markers by now.

Dottie J. Miller San Antonio, TX <dottiem@samcrc.com>


Re: Explanation of "Impf-Schein" on family documents #germany

Michael Nussbaum
 

This is an official document which was issued after a child received a
vaccine.

Michael Nussbaum, NYC, USA <MichaelNussbaum1@msn.com>


German SIG #Germany Re: Explanation of "Impf-Schein" on family documents #germany

Michael Nussbaum
 

This is an official document which was issued after a child received a
vaccine.

Michael Nussbaum, NYC, USA <MichaelNussbaum1@msn.com>


Re: Explanation of "Impf-Schein" on family documents #germany

Brian Stern <brians99@...>
 

On Sep 23, 2008, at 9:02 PM, Michael Marx wrote:
I have a number of family documents (colored paper 8 1/2 x 6 1/2)
with the heading Impf-Schein (Weiderimpfung). Could some explain the
meaning of these documents.
Those are vaccination certificates. Before 1900 the only vaccine was
for smallpox, and that's what those documents represent. I don't know
what the law was in Germany at that time but I think that children
were required to be vaccinated. The documents I've seen list a
child's name and the date and place of vaccination. I think each child
received several vaccinations.

Brian Stern Lexington, KY <brians99@bellsouth.net>


German SIG #Germany Re: Explanation of "Impf-Schein" on family documents #germany

Brian Stern <brians99@...>
 

On Sep 23, 2008, at 9:02 PM, Michael Marx wrote:
I have a number of family documents (colored paper 8 1/2 x 6 1/2)
with the heading Impf-Schein (Weiderimpfung). Could some explain the
meaning of these documents.
Those are vaccination certificates. Before 1900 the only vaccine was
for smallpox, and that's what those documents represent. I don't know
what the law was in Germany at that time but I think that children
were required to be vaccinated. The documents I've seen list a
child's name and the date and place of vaccination. I think each child
received several vaccinations.

Brian Stern Lexington, KY <brians99@bellsouth.net>


EnglishTranslation of Polish "pr. h." #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Need translation of the abbreviations "pr. h"

The student records listing was
Linderdornfeld, Pinkas pr. h.

Please respond to me directly.
Thanks.

Alan Weiser
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring, MD USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia EnglishTranslation of Polish "pr. h." #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Need translation of the abbreviations "pr. h"

The student records listing was
Linderdornfeld, Pinkas pr. h.

Please respond to me directly.
Thanks.

Alan Weiser
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring, MD USA


vital records Brody and Okopy #galicia

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

For vital records, go to the Polish State Archives website and
type in the name of the town:

http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA

Rivka Schirman <capitetes@wanadoo.Fr> wrote:

Can anyone tell me where I can find the following records?
(They're not listed on the website of Routes to Roots.)

1. vital records for the towns of Brody and Okopy (now Ukraine) of
the 20th century, i.e., 1900 -1939.
2. property records the towns of Brody and Okopy (now Ukraine) of
the 20th century, i.e., 1900 -1939.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia vital records Brody and Okopy #galicia

Fay Bussgang <fbussgang@...>
 

For vital records, go to the Polish State Archives website and
type in the name of the town:

http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en

Fay Bussgang
Lexington, MA

Rivka Schirman <capitetes@wanadoo.Fr> wrote:

Can anyone tell me where I can find the following records?
(They're not listed on the website of Routes to Roots.)

1. vital records for the towns of Brody and Okopy (now Ukraine) of
the 20th century, i.e., 1900 -1939.
2. property records the towns of Brody and Okopy (now Ukraine) of
the 20th century, i.e., 1900 -1939.


Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Queens, NY Searchable Database Now Online #lithuania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This evening the searchable database of approximately 88,000 burials went
online for Mt. Lebanon Cemetery in Glendale, Queens, New York. I am assuming
that this is not a test and will still be online tomorrow morning, but you
never know. Whichever the case, it is ready (or nearly so) for you to use.
There are more than 260 society plots within this cemetery. On the cemetery
website, just click on the link at the top of the page that says "Interment
Search/Genealogy" and search away.

On the website main page is a link to the Cemetery Grounds Map.

The searchable fields are First Name, Last Name, Date of Death (Month/Year),
Block, Reference, and Society (Name.)

Just did a couple of initial tries, and the fields seem to be working
properly.

As to Block and Reference, Block is the block number or letter as it appears
on the Cemetery Grounds Map. Reference refers to the gate number. You can
also use the searchable JGSNY database to determine the Block and Reference
(Gate) number and use those numbers and letters if you wish. This can be
found at www.jgsny.org/searchcity.htm.

As to the Society (Name) field, I would suggest that before using this
search field, you click on the "About Us" link at the top of each page,
scroll down to the link for "societies/organiations/synagogues," click on
it, then look for the society of interest to you. I might suggest for now
that you use the "commonly used name" first in the Society field, and if
that doesn't work, just chose a keyword >from this "commonly used name,"
preferably the word that signifies, e.g., the town that the plot is
associated with.

The best enhanced feature it seems is that this database displays a
maximum of 500 search results.

The Mt. Lebanon Cemetery website and searchable database can be found at
www.mountlebanoncemetery.com.

If you notice any particular problems with this database, i.e. functional
problems, and not that you can't find a name, there is a spelling or data
entry mistake, please let me know and I will let them know.
So far, the database looks good.

This is the sixth NYC Queens cemetery database that is now online, and I
believe that combined these databases allow us to search among 630,000
records!

Still to come, perhaps in the next few months, will be Knollwood Park
Cemetery, which now is supervised by the folks at nearby Mt. Carmel
Cemetery. You will be able to find these records on the Mt. Carmel Cemetery
website once it is uploaded, though it could be, as I've said, a few months
or so.

Glad I could be the bearer of good tidings!

L'Shana Tova,
Steven Lasky
New York
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Queens, NY Searchable Database Now Online #lithuania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This evening the searchable database of approximately 88,000 burials went
online for Mt. Lebanon Cemetery in Glendale, Queens, New York. I am assuming
that this is not a test and will still be online tomorrow morning, but you
never know. Whichever the case, it is ready (or nearly so) for you to use.
There are more than 260 society plots within this cemetery. On the cemetery
website, just click on the link at the top of the page that says "Interment
Search/Genealogy" and search away.

On the website main page is a link to the Cemetery Grounds Map.

The searchable fields are First Name, Last Name, Date of Death (Month/Year),
Block, Reference, and Society (Name.)

Just did a couple of initial tries, and the fields seem to be working
properly.

As to Block and Reference, Block is the block number or letter as it appears
on the Cemetery Grounds Map. Reference refers to the gate number. You can
also use the searchable JGSNY database to determine the Block and Reference
(Gate) number and use those numbers and letters if you wish. This can be
found at www.jgsny.org/searchcity.htm.

As to the Society (Name) field, I would suggest that before using this
search field, you click on the "About Us" link at the top of each page,
scroll down to the link for "societies/organiations/synagogues," click on
it, then look for the society of interest to you. I might suggest for now
that you use the "commonly used name" first in the Society field, and if
that doesn't work, just chose a keyword >from this "commonly used name,"
preferably the word that signifies, e.g., the town that the plot is
associated with.

The best enhanced feature it seems is that this database displays a
maximum of 500 search results.

The Mt. Lebanon Cemetery website and searchable database can be found at
www.mountlebanoncemetery.com.

If you notice any particular problems with this database, i.e. functional
problems, and not that you can't find a name, there is a spelling or data
entry mistake, please let me know and I will let them know.
So far, the database looks good.

This is the sixth NYC Queens cemetery database that is now online, and I
believe that combined these databases allow us to search among 630,000
records!

Still to come, perhaps in the next few months, will be Knollwood Park
Cemetery, which now is supervised by the folks at nearby Mt. Carmel
Cemetery. You will be able to find these records on the Mt. Carmel Cemetery
website once it is uploaded, though it could be, as I've said, a few months
or so.

Glad I could be the bearer of good tidings!

L'Shana Tova,
Steven Lasky
New York
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com


Vilna Telephone Directories #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

We (Logan Kleinwaks, Michael Gordon and I) are looking at a project
to scan and provide searchable databases of the following:

1930 Vilnius Telephone Directory
1935 Vilnius Telephone Directory

Is anyone aware of any institution ( e.g. in E. Europe) that may
already have done this?

The intention is to make the whole lot available online free of charge.
Some may have heard Logan's talk at the recent Chicago IAJGS Conference-
for methodology and existing online directories see Logan Kleinwaks' site
< http://genealogyindexer.org >

To the best of our knowledge these directories are not in the Library
of Congress, British Library, YIVO or any other major Western Library.

Please contact me privately if you are aware of any existing online
sites with these directories.

Saul Issroff
saul@issroff.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilna Telephone Directories #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

We (Logan Kleinwaks, Michael Gordon and I) are looking at a project
to scan and provide searchable databases of the following:

1930 Vilnius Telephone Directory
1935 Vilnius Telephone Directory

Is anyone aware of any institution ( e.g. in E. Europe) that may
already have done this?

The intention is to make the whole lot available online free of charge.
Some may have heard Logan's talk at the recent Chicago IAJGS Conference-
for methodology and existing online directories see Logan Kleinwaks' site
< http://genealogyindexer.org >

To the best of our knowledge these directories are not in the Library
of Congress, British Library, YIVO or any other major Western Library.

Please contact me privately if you are aware of any existing online
sites with these directories.

Saul Issroff
saul@issroff.com


Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Queens, NY Searchable Database Now Online #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This evening the searchable database of approximately 88,000 burials went
online for Mt. Lebanon Cemetery in Glendale, Queens, New York. I am assuming
that this is not a test and will still be online tomorrow morning, but you
never know. Whichever the case, it is ready (or nearly so) for you to use.
There are more than 260 society plots within this cemetery. On the cemetery
website, just click on the link at the top of the page that says "Interment
Search/Genealogy" and search away.

On the website main page is a link to the Cemetery Grounds Map.

The searchable fields are First Name, Last Name, Date of Death (Month/Year),
Block, Reference, and Society (Name.)

Just did a couple of initial tries, and the fields seem to be working
properly.

As to Block and Reference, Block is the block number or letter as it appears
on the Cemetery Grounds Map. Reference refers to the gate number. You can
also use the searchable JGSNY database to determine the Block and Reference
(Gate) number and use those numbers and letters if you wish. This can be
found at www.jgsny.org/searchcity.htm.

As to the Society (Name) field, I would suggest that before using this
search field, you click on the "About Us" link at the top of each page,
scroll down to the link for "societies/organiations/synagogues," click on
it, then look for the society of interest to you. I might suggest for now
that you use the "commonly used name" first in the Society field, and if
that doesn't work, just chose a keyword >from this "commonly used name,"
preferably the word that signifies, e.g., the town that the plot is
associated with.

The best enhanced feature it seems is that this database dispalys a
maximum of 500 search results.

The Mt. Lebanon Cemetery website and searchable database can be found at
www.mountlebanoncemetery.com.

If you notice any particular problems with this database, i.e. functional
problems, and not that you can't find a name, there is a spelling or data
entry mistake, please let me know and I will let them know.
So far, the database looks good.

This is the sixth NYC Queens cemetery database that is now online, and I
believe that combined these databases allow us to search among 630,000
records!

Still to come, perhaps in the next few months, will be Knollwood Park
Cemetery, which now is supervised by the folks at nearby Mt. Carmel
Cemetery. You will be able to find these records on the Mt. Carmel Cemetery
website once it is uploaded, though it could be, as I've said, a few months
or so.

Glad I could be the bearer of good tidings!

L'Shana Tova,
Steven Lasky
New York
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com


JRI Poland #Poland Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Queens, NY Searchable Database Now Online #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This evening the searchable database of approximately 88,000 burials went
online for Mt. Lebanon Cemetery in Glendale, Queens, New York. I am assuming
that this is not a test and will still be online tomorrow morning, but you
never know. Whichever the case, it is ready (or nearly so) for you to use.
There are more than 260 society plots within this cemetery. On the cemetery
website, just click on the link at the top of the page that says "Interment
Search/Genealogy" and search away.

On the website main page is a link to the Cemetery Grounds Map.

The searchable fields are First Name, Last Name, Date of Death (Month/Year),
Block, Reference, and Society (Name.)

Just did a couple of initial tries, and the fields seem to be working
properly.

As to Block and Reference, Block is the block number or letter as it appears
on the Cemetery Grounds Map. Reference refers to the gate number. You can
also use the searchable JGSNY database to determine the Block and Reference
(Gate) number and use those numbers and letters if you wish. This can be
found at www.jgsny.org/searchcity.htm.

As to the Society (Name) field, I would suggest that before using this
search field, you click on the "About Us" link at the top of each page,
scroll down to the link for "societies/organiations/synagogues," click on
it, then look for the society of interest to you. I might suggest for now
that you use the "commonly used name" first in the Society field, and if
that doesn't work, just chose a keyword >from this "commonly used name,"
preferably the word that signifies, e.g., the town that the plot is
associated with.

The best enhanced feature it seems is that this database dispalys a
maximum of 500 search results.

The Mt. Lebanon Cemetery website and searchable database can be found at
www.mountlebanoncemetery.com.

If you notice any particular problems with this database, i.e. functional
problems, and not that you can't find a name, there is a spelling or data
entry mistake, please let me know and I will let them know.
So far, the database looks good.

This is the sixth NYC Queens cemetery database that is now online, and I
believe that combined these databases allow us to search among 630,000
records!

Still to come, perhaps in the next few months, will be Knollwood Park
Cemetery, which now is supervised by the folks at nearby Mt. Carmel
Cemetery. You will be able to find these records on the Mt. Carmel Cemetery
website once it is uploaded, though it could be, as I've said, a few months
or so.

Glad I could be the bearer of good tidings!

L'Shana Tova,
Steven Lasky
New York
steve@museumoffamilyhistory.com


Need help with my grandfather's name #poland

zbs71@ukgateway.net <zbs71@...>
 

I need help in understanding how my grandfather's Russian/Polish name
turned into his "American" name. His American name was Herman Bruner.
He emigrated, passing through the port of Bremen, to the USA in 1903
under the name "Hermann Brunner". But in researching my Jewish Polish
roots, I have found his marriage to my grandmother - and his name in
the index is "Gerzel German Bryner". I am wondering how "Gerzel
German" turned in "Herman(n)".

Any suggestions would be gratefully received.

Jane Bruner Mullane


JRI Poland #Poland Need help with my grandfather's name #poland

zbs71@ukgateway.net <zbs71@...>
 

I need help in understanding how my grandfather's Russian/Polish name
turned into his "American" name. His American name was Herman Bruner.
He emigrated, passing through the port of Bremen, to the USA in 1903
under the name "Hermann Brunner". But in researching my Jewish Polish
roots, I have found his marriage to my grandmother - and his name in
the index is "Gerzel German Bryner". I am wondering how "Gerzel
German" turned in "Herman(n)".

Any suggestions would be gratefully received.

Jane Bruner Mullane