Date   

New Sefer Torah for Brest after 75 years #rabbinic

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

Just as the new Brest Yiskor book is released, the Brest - Brisk
community celebrates a new Sefer Torah after 75 years.

Read the details and see the photos at:

http://elirab.me/2014/06/11/new-sefer-torah-for-brisk-after-75-years/

or on the Brest kehilalink:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/New_Torah.html

and

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/Yizkor_Book.html

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic New Sefer Torah for Brest after 75 years #rabbinic

Eli Rabinowitz
 

Hi All

Just as the new Brest Yiskor book is released, the Brest - Brisk
community celebrates a new Sefer Torah after 75 years.

Read the details and see the photos at:

http://elirab.me/2014/06/11/new-sefer-torah-for-brisk-after-75-years/

or on the Brest kehilalink:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/New_Torah.html

and

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/brest/Yizkor_Book.html

Thanks and regards

Eli Rabinowitz
Perth, Australia


Rabbi Eliaho GABAI #rabbinic

Andrea Tzadik <andrea@...>
 

Does anyone have any information on Rabbi Eliaho GABAI >from either
Rohaytn or Knyhinicze?
I know he was still alive in the 1920's.

Andrea Tzadik
andrea@tzadik.net


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Eliaho GABAI #rabbinic

Andrea Tzadik <andrea@...>
 

Does anyone have any information on Rabbi Eliaho GABAI >from either
Rohaytn or Knyhinicze?
I know he was still alive in the 1920's.

Andrea Tzadik
andrea@tzadik.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #yizkorbooks

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #yizkorbooks

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Visit Libau?? #latvia

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Hi everyone. As part of my cruise of the Baltics in July, I will be
taking a side trip to Plunge and Kretinga in Lithuania after
disembarking in Klaipeda. The plan is to then drive (with a guide
and driver) to Liepaja. >from there we would drive 4 hours (looking
at Googlemaps) to meet the ship in Riga the next day. We need to be
back on board at 2PM.

I did want to include Liepaja since my grandmother was born there,
and that is where the family left for America in 1900. I'm starting
to second guess myself and am wondering if I will get a good sense of
this city as it was when my grandmother with her family. I already
know that the street where my great-grandfather's shop was is now a
very big thoroughfare and that this is a modern city. I do wonder
if I am pushing this agenda, given the time constraints.

My guide comes very well-recommended, however, she has not been very
communicative. Has anyone made this journey? Wondering if I should
keep it a day trip to Plunge and Kretinga and forget the overnight
piece. If we do the 2-day trip, we would not have time to sight-see
in Riga. Worth the trade-off?

Thanks for any thoughts.

Elaine Bush


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #scandinavia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #sephardic

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latvia SIG #Latvia Visit Libau?? #latvia

Elaine Bush <erbush@...>
 

Hi everyone. As part of my cruise of the Baltics in July, I will be
taking a side trip to Plunge and Kretinga in Lithuania after
disembarking in Klaipeda. The plan is to then drive (with a guide
and driver) to Liepaja. >from there we would drive 4 hours (looking
at Googlemaps) to meet the ship in Riga the next day. We need to be
back on board at 2PM.

I did want to include Liepaja since my grandmother was born there,
and that is where the family left for America in 1900. I'm starting
to second guess myself and am wondering if I will get a good sense of
this city as it was when my grandmother with her family. I already
know that the street where my great-grandfather's shop was is now a
very big thoroughfare and that this is a modern city. I do wonder
if I am pushing this agenda, given the time constraints.

My guide comes very well-recommended, however, she has not been very
communicative. Has anyone made this journey? Wondering if I should
keep it a day trip to Plunge and Kretinga and forget the overnight
piece. If we do the 2-day trip, we would not have time to sight-see
in Riga. Worth the trade-off?

Thanks for any thoughts.

Elaine Bush


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #scandinavia

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #sephardic

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #dna

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


DNA Research #DNA Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #dna

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by
the Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen,
Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn
sdh2381@comcast.net


Fw: "Un-helpful people" #general

Roy Star
 

Further to the recent discussion with regard to 'un-helpful' people, for
whatever their reasons : I have always found most people to be very
helpful, whenever I have thrown a question out there, and the very
helpful responses I have received. However, I had one instance, which
was the one that mattered the most, when their response was really needed.
This happened last year. I managed to track-down a distant relative,
who was in his 90's, and now living in Florida. 
 
I found his postal address and telephone number.  I called him >from
London,England - and he seemed delighted to hear >from me, and to share common 
knowledge about our anscestors.

I asked him if I could send him a list of questions that I needed clearing-up,
and he freely gave me his mail address.

I waited some weeks, but I didn't get a response. In case I wrote the email
address down incorrectly, I printed it out, and sent it to him by 'snail
mail'.

Again, I didn't receive a response.

It is a shame when someone who could obviously help to clarify certain
information, who is also one of the few descendants left of an era, does not
respond.

My channels of research for Tarnopol, Zbaraz and L'viv are now exhausted. 
The recent 1910 Tarnopol Census helped me solve one 'brick wall' I had,
and I am so grateful to those people who made it possible. I find it difficult
to understand, however,that for major cities such as Tarnopol, and nearby
Zbaraz, that there are so few records presently available
on line. Many towns and villages that I have never heard of previously are
regularly added to the list, but Tarnopol and Zbaraz who I would have thought
were important, are sorely under-represented. I do hope earlier records become
available in the not too distant future.

Roy Star
(roystar20@gmail.com)

Researching :  STARISSOLLER (various spellings):Tarnopol, Zbaraz, New York.
                GRUN:Tarnopol,   GERSHCOWIT(Z):Lithuania,   WAINSTAIN:Tarnopol,
                GRADNER:Bialystok, Cape Town SA,  
                WARMAN (various spellings):Galicia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fw: "Un-helpful people" #general

Roy Star
 

Further to the recent discussion with regard to 'un-helpful' people, for
whatever their reasons : I have always found most people to be very
helpful, whenever I have thrown a question out there, and the very
helpful responses I have received. However, I had one instance, which
was the one that mattered the most, when their response was really needed.
This happened last year. I managed to track-down a distant relative,
who was in his 90's, and now living in Florida. 
 
I found his postal address and telephone number.  I called him >from
London,England - and he seemed delighted to hear >from me, and to share common 
knowledge about our anscestors.

I asked him if I could send him a list of questions that I needed clearing-up,
and he freely gave me his mail address.

I waited some weeks, but I didn't get a response. In case I wrote the email
address down incorrectly, I printed it out, and sent it to him by 'snail
mail'.

Again, I didn't receive a response.

It is a shame when someone who could obviously help to clarify certain
information, who is also one of the few descendants left of an era, does not
respond.

My channels of research for Tarnopol, Zbaraz and L'viv are now exhausted. 
The recent 1910 Tarnopol Census helped me solve one 'brick wall' I had,
and I am so grateful to those people who made it possible. I find it difficult
to understand, however,that for major cities such as Tarnopol, and nearby
Zbaraz, that there are so few records presently available
on line. Many towns and villages that I have never heard of previously are
regularly added to the list, but Tarnopol and Zbaraz who I would have thought
were important, are sorely under-represented. I do hope earlier records become
available in the not too distant future.

Roy Star
(roystar20@gmail.com)

Researching :  STARISSOLLER (various spellings):Tarnopol, Zbaraz, New York.
                GRUN:Tarnopol,   GERSHCOWIT(Z):Lithuania,   WAINSTAIN:Tarnopol,
                GRADNER:Bialystok, Cape Town SA,  
                WARMAN (various spellings):Galicia


New to the Gesher Galicia Map Room: Debica 1849 Cadastral Map! #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia announces the addition of a new cadastral map to the
Gesher Galicia Cadastral Map Room:

"Debica Town Cadastral Map 1849"

A complete full-color lithographed cadastral map of the town of Debica
(Dembica, Dembitz, Debica), >from 1849. Land parcels and houses are all
clearly numbered; redline manuscript revisions show changes >from the
1849 edition intended for a later update. The map includes both
masonry and wooden buildings, a market square, two synagogues and a
large church complex, plus a Jewish and a Catholic cemetery. This map
depicts the town before its boom period in the latter half of the 19th
century, when it became a crossroads on Imperial rail lines connecting
Lwow, Krakow, and Sandomierz. Images for this map were provided to
Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum Panstwowe w Przemyslu.

Direct link: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/debica-dembica-1849/

Today, Debica is a town in southeastern Poland with 46,693, the
capital of Debica County and since 1999 it has been situated in the
Podkarpackie Voivodeship; it had previously been in the Tarnow
Voivodeship. The town is part of the Kolbuszowa Region Research Group
(KRRG,) and there is a wealth of descriptive information on the town
here:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kolbuszowa/debica/debica.html

Especially intersting, in light of what this map shows and the
historical background provided in the descriptive text, is the English
translation >from the Polish Geographical Dictionary (Slownik
Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1881) written 32 years
later, provided by William F. Hoffman:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kolbuszowa/debica/debica10.html

Thanks to Gesher Galicia's Map Room coordinator, Jay Osborn, for
getting this new map online and to the Polish State Archives in
Przemsyl for their cooperation.

To view the entire map room collection go to:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org and to read and FAQ on the history of
cadastral maps in the Austro-Hungarian Empire go to:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/references/index.html

Read about our Cadastral Map & Landowner Records Project:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/cadastral-map-and-landowner-records/

Even if you are not a Debica researcher, I urge you to take a tour of
this charming, pastel-colored 1849 incarnation of a shtetl by clicking
the map link above and zooming in to (virtually) stroll around its
streets and neighborhoods.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New to the Gesher Galicia Map Room: Debica 1849 Cadastral Map! #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia announces the addition of a new cadastral map to the
Gesher Galicia Cadastral Map Room:

"Debica Town Cadastral Map 1849"

A complete full-color lithographed cadastral map of the town of Debica
(Dembica, Dembitz, Debica), >from 1849. Land parcels and houses are all
clearly numbered; redline manuscript revisions show changes >from the
1849 edition intended for a later update. The map includes both
masonry and wooden buildings, a market square, two synagogues and a
large church complex, plus a Jewish and a Catholic cemetery. This map
depicts the town before its boom period in the latter half of the 19th
century, when it became a crossroads on Imperial rail lines connecting
Lwow, Krakow, and Sandomierz. Images for this map were provided to
Gesher Galicia by the Archiwum Panstwowe w Przemyslu.

Direct link: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/debica-dembica-1849/

Today, Debica is a town in southeastern Poland with 46,693, the
capital of Debica County and since 1999 it has been situated in the
Podkarpackie Voivodeship; it had previously been in the Tarnow
Voivodeship. The town is part of the Kolbuszowa Region Research Group
(KRRG,) and there is a wealth of descriptive information on the town
here:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kolbuszowa/debica/debica.html

Especially intersting, in light of what this map shows and the
historical background provided in the descriptive text, is the English
translation >from the Polish Geographical Dictionary (Slownik
Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego - Warsaw 1881) written 32 years
later, provided by William F. Hoffman:

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kolbuszowa/debica/debica10.html

Thanks to Gesher Galicia's Map Room coordinator, Jay Osborn, for
getting this new map online and to the Polish State Archives in
Przemsyl for their cooperation.

To view the entire map room collection go to:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org and to read and FAQ on the history of
cadastral maps in the Austro-Hungarian Empire go to:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/references/index.html

Read about our Cadastral Map & Landowner Records Project:

http://www.geshergalicia.org/projects/cadastral-map-and-landowner-records/

Even if you are not a Debica researcher, I urge you to take a tour of
this charming, pastel-colored 1849 incarnation of a shtetl by clicking
the map link above and zooming in to (virtually) stroll around its
streets and neighborhoods.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
http://www.geshergalicia.org

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