Date   

Poor Sephardic Jews who left Amsterdam #sephardic

macsta@...
 

Dear all,

A list covering the period 1759-1813 with the names of 448 poor
Sephardic families who were granted Sedaca (charity) against the
promise to leave Amsterdam and not to return within the next 15
years is now online at:

http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/AmsterdamPoorSrchFrm.html

The preferred destinations were: Surinam, Curacao, St. Eustatius,
Jamaica, London, Bordeaux and Bayonne, Hamburg, Livorno and other
Sephardic communities.

The list has been found by Mrs. Vibeke Sealtiel Olsen in the
Amsterdam Municipality Archives. She deciphered and indexed it.

Shalom,

Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Poor Sephardic Jews who left Amsterdam #sephardic

macsta@...
 

Dear all,

A list covering the period 1759-1813 with the names of 448 poor
Sephardic families who were granted Sedaca (charity) against the
promise to leave Amsterdam and not to return within the next 15
years is now online at:

http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/AmsterdamPoorSrchFrm.html

The preferred destinations were: Surinam, Curacao, St. Eustatius,
Jamaica, London, Bordeaux and Bayonne, Hamburg, Livorno and other
Sephardic communities.

The list has been found by Mrs. Vibeke Sealtiel Olsen in the
Amsterdam Municipality Archives. She deciphered and indexed it.

Shalom,

Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem


Re: postponed registration of marriages, Galicia, 1902 #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

This has been discussed >from time to time on this list.

Most likely they had a religious marriage many years earlier which
was not recognized by the Austrian civil authorities. As a result
their children were recorded as illegitimate in the civil records
and for such purposes as name used in military service, issuance of
passport, etc.

Many couples in this situation regularized their status, and the
status of their children, in later years when the civil marriage
laws were less restrictive. They often did this in preparation for
migration to America.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

PZAVON@Rochester.rr.com

"Sharlene Kranz" <skranz_99@yahoo.com> wrote

I have found two families who registered their marriages civilly
many years after the actual marriage. Two couples in Dzikow,
Galicia registered their marriages in 1902, both already having
grown children. What reasons were there for Jewish couples to
delay registering a marriage? And was there anything special
about 1902?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: postponed registration of marriages, Galicia, 1902 #general

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

This has been discussed >from time to time on this list.

Most likely they had a religious marriage many years earlier which
was not recognized by the Austrian civil authorities. As a result
their children were recorded as illegitimate in the civil records
and for such purposes as name used in military service, issuance of
passport, etc.

Many couples in this situation regularized their status, and the
status of their children, in later years when the civil marriage
laws were less restrictive. They often did this in preparation for
migration to America.

Peter Zavon
Penfield, NY

PZAVON@Rochester.rr.com

"Sharlene Kranz" <skranz_99@yahoo.com> wrote

I have found two families who registered their marriages civilly
many years after the actual marriage. Two couples in Dzikow,
Galicia registered their marriages in 1902, both already having
grown children. What reasons were there for Jewish couples to
delay registering a marriage? And was there anything special
about 1902?


Prewar death in Poland #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I understand that Michael BORENSTEIN of Pultusk died shortly before
the war, perhaps in Warsaw. He was probably born about 1900. Are
there any records one can consult to find out more information?

--
Paul Silverstone
New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Prewar death in Poland #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I understand that Michael BORENSTEIN of Pultusk died shortly before
the war, perhaps in Warsaw. He was probably born about 1900. Are
there any records one can consult to find out more information?

--
Paul Silverstone
New York


Re: The Origin of the POLONSKY Surname #general

A. Krauss <avkrauss@...>
 

Jeffrey Mark Paull wrote:

The following analysis is >from my soon-to-be-published book: "The
Ancient Lineage of the Polonsky and Paull Family -- A Millennium
of Genealogy, History and Heritage."

If the Jewish-derived surname Polonsky actually meant ">from Poland,"
one would expect to see two distinct demographic trends:

(1) Polonsky would be a very common Jewish surname, since a
very large number of Jews descend >from Poland, and

(2) A significant proportion of Polonsky immigrants to America
would be of Polish nationality.

Not so.
1)It does not follow that because a large number of Jews descend from
Poland, Polonsky would be a common name. Many other factors went into
choice of names, topography being just one of them.

2) Furthermore, the argument that if Polonsky meant ">from Poland" a
significant proportion of immigrant who have that name would be of
Polish nationality, is not true. It is the opposite. Had we find a
large proportion of late eighteenth century or twentieth century
immigrants named Polonsky >from Poland, that would indicate the name
Polonsky does *not* mean ">from Poland." Only a person who left Poland,
would be referred to as ">from Poland." This would distinguish him from
his neighbor, while it would be meaningless in his native Poland.
Consequently, when surnames were taken, the person named ">from Poland"
would have already left his original country. When he immigrated later
to the U.S. and elsewhere one hundred years later, his "native"
country would be somewhere other than Poland.

Avrohom Krauss


Re: The Origin of the POLONSKY Surname #general

David Ellis
 

"Jeffrey Mark Paull" <saxkat@msn.com> writes:

If the Jewish-derived surname Polonsky actually meant ">from Poland,"
one would expect to see two distinct demographic trends:

(1) Polonsky would be a very common Jewish surname, since a
very large number of Jews descend >from Poland, and

(2) A significant proportion of Polonsky immigrants to America
would be of Polish nationality.

In reality, neither one of these demographic trends have been observed,
which lends support to the traditional definition of the Jewish-derived
Polonsky surname as a toponym, and that the place of origin was limited in
geographic scope to either the town of Polonnoye, the village of Polonsk,
or perhaps both.
In Eastern Europe, Jewish families were generally required to take on
surnames early in the 19th century. I agree that it makes little sense for
Jews *in* Poland to choose a surname meaning ">from Poland".

On the other hand, POLONSKY doesn't have to be a toponym for a single town;
there is another alternative. The surname POLONSKY could have originated
with families who had left Poland for Russia in the late 18th century. When
they took on surnames, the choice of POLONSKY would serve as a reminder of
where they had previously resided.

There are several thousand people in the United States named POLONSKY today.
Has anybody done research to see if the POLONSKY families can link their
trees together? For some surnames, such as GOODBLATT in my family or
BARENBERG in my wife's family, everybody is demonstrably related, while for
others, there are separate families between which nobody can establish
connections. Which would be the case with POLONSKY?

In my own genealogical research, I have found that names are far >from exact,
and there are often rewards for lateral thinking. Here's an "outside the
box" idea that might apply to this discussion. The surname POLANSKY is more
common than POLONSKY. Are there any connections between these two names?

---

David J Ellis
Natick, MA
djemkitso@verizon.net


POLONSKY #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Dear Dr. Paull:

Have you considered that POLANSKY et al are variants of POLIONSKY?

I am the Project leader for the indexing of Jews buried in Arlington
National Cenmentery and although I have not been following the details of
your discussion on the JewishGen Discussion group, I recalled the name and
looked it up.At the present time, we have one Jewish person named
POLONSKY(Ralph) in our records, but we do have three with the name
POLANSKY, one with the name POLIN, one named POLLAN and another named
POLINER.

My maiden name is KATZ. As you noted, this is one of the most common Jewish
names, but in my 52 years of research, I have found it translated into
English with many different spellings. The traditional meaning is given as
cohen tzadek (righteous cohen), but I have proven through DNA testing, what
my father and grandfather already knew - they are not cohanim!

Good luck with your research and book.

Marlene Bishow
Immediate Past President,
Co-Chair of DC2011: The 31st IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw
Project Manager
The Ken Poch Index of Jews Buried in Arlington National Cemetery
http://www.cygnet.org/anc2008/

Researching:
KATZ, in Zhuravno, Galicia.(now Ukraine)
DEUTSCHER & NUSSBAUM in Rozniativ, Galicia (now Ukraine)
HANTMAN, GANTMAN and SINGER in Smilovichi and Koidanovo, Bel.
SHOMER, SOMMERS, SOHMER & KULPE in Lithuania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Origin of the POLONSKY Surname #general

A. Krauss <avkrauss@...>
 

Jeffrey Mark Paull wrote:

The following analysis is >from my soon-to-be-published book: "The
Ancient Lineage of the Polonsky and Paull Family -- A Millennium
of Genealogy, History and Heritage."

If the Jewish-derived surname Polonsky actually meant ">from Poland,"
one would expect to see two distinct demographic trends:

(1) Polonsky would be a very common Jewish surname, since a
very large number of Jews descend >from Poland, and

(2) A significant proportion of Polonsky immigrants to America
would be of Polish nationality.

Not so.
1)It does not follow that because a large number of Jews descend from
Poland, Polonsky would be a common name. Many other factors went into
choice of names, topography being just one of them.

2) Furthermore, the argument that if Polonsky meant ">from Poland" a
significant proportion of immigrant who have that name would be of
Polish nationality, is not true. It is the opposite. Had we find a
large proportion of late eighteenth century or twentieth century
immigrants named Polonsky >from Poland, that would indicate the name
Polonsky does *not* mean ">from Poland." Only a person who left Poland,
would be referred to as ">from Poland." This would distinguish him from
his neighbor, while it would be meaningless in his native Poland.
Consequently, when surnames were taken, the person named ">from Poland"
would have already left his original country. When he immigrated later
to the U.S. and elsewhere one hundred years later, his "native"
country would be somewhere other than Poland.

Avrohom Krauss


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Origin of the POLONSKY Surname #general

David Ellis
 

"Jeffrey Mark Paull" <saxkat@msn.com> writes:

If the Jewish-derived surname Polonsky actually meant ">from Poland,"
one would expect to see two distinct demographic trends:

(1) Polonsky would be a very common Jewish surname, since a
very large number of Jews descend >from Poland, and

(2) A significant proportion of Polonsky immigrants to America
would be of Polish nationality.

In reality, neither one of these demographic trends have been observed,
which lends support to the traditional definition of the Jewish-derived
Polonsky surname as a toponym, and that the place of origin was limited in
geographic scope to either the town of Polonnoye, the village of Polonsk,
or perhaps both.
In Eastern Europe, Jewish families were generally required to take on
surnames early in the 19th century. I agree that it makes little sense for
Jews *in* Poland to choose a surname meaning ">from Poland".

On the other hand, POLONSKY doesn't have to be a toponym for a single town;
there is another alternative. The surname POLONSKY could have originated
with families who had left Poland for Russia in the late 18th century. When
they took on surnames, the choice of POLONSKY would serve as a reminder of
where they had previously resided.

There are several thousand people in the United States named POLONSKY today.
Has anybody done research to see if the POLONSKY families can link their
trees together? For some surnames, such as GOODBLATT in my family or
BARENBERG in my wife's family, everybody is demonstrably related, while for
others, there are separate families between which nobody can establish
connections. Which would be the case with POLONSKY?

In my own genealogical research, I have found that names are far >from exact,
and there are often rewards for lateral thinking. Here's an "outside the
box" idea that might apply to this discussion. The surname POLANSKY is more
common than POLONSKY. Are there any connections between these two names?

---

David J Ellis
Natick, MA
djemkitso@verizon.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen POLONSKY #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

Dear Dr. Paull:

Have you considered that POLANSKY et al are variants of POLIONSKY?

I am the Project leader for the indexing of Jews buried in Arlington
National Cenmentery and although I have not been following the details of
your discussion on the JewishGen Discussion group, I recalled the name and
looked it up.At the present time, we have one Jewish person named
POLONSKY(Ralph) in our records, but we do have three with the name
POLANSKY, one with the name POLIN, one named POLLAN and another named
POLINER.

My maiden name is KATZ. As you noted, this is one of the most common Jewish
names, but in my 52 years of research, I have found it translated into
English with many different spellings. The traditional meaning is given as
cohen tzadek (righteous cohen), but I have proven through DNA testing, what
my father and grandfather already knew - they are not cohanim!

Good luck with your research and book.

Marlene Bishow
Immediate Past President,
Co-Chair of DC2011: The 31st IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw
Project Manager
The Ken Poch Index of Jews Buried in Arlington National Cemetery
http://www.cygnet.org/anc2008/

Researching:
KATZ, in Zhuravno, Galicia.(now Ukraine)
DEUTSCHER & NUSSBAUM in Rozniativ, Galicia (now Ukraine)
HANTMAN, GANTMAN and SINGER in Smilovichi and Koidanovo, Bel.
SHOMER, SOMMERS, SOHMER & KULPE in Lithuania


Searching GOLDFARB, Kishinev-->Argentina #general

Sergio Tell <info@...>
 

I would like to know if some one knows anything about my grandfather.
He was born in Kishinev, Romania, in 1895 and escape the pogrom of
1903 to Argentina. In Romania his name was Yosel GOLDFARB and his
father was Czyl or Yekhezkl Goldfarb. I found that Czyl died >from
injuries after the pogrom in 1903 so my grandfather went away
together with his brother Avrom. They leaved 2 sisters in Kishinev,
Sara and Guize but few years after they worked and make some money
in Argentina, and they asked them to come and they did so. I was
checking several places trying also to find out what was the name of
the ship that they went away because we now a lot less about my
grandmother. If some one has any ideas please email me privately.

Shalom and Toda Raba (Thanks)

Sergio Tell
serg_tell@yahoo.com
Melbourne - Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching GOLDFARB, Kishinev-->Argentina #general

Sergio Tell <info@...>
 

I would like to know if some one knows anything about my grandfather.
He was born in Kishinev, Romania, in 1895 and escape the pogrom of
1903 to Argentina. In Romania his name was Yosel GOLDFARB and his
father was Czyl or Yekhezkl Goldfarb. I found that Czyl died >from
injuries after the pogrom in 1903 so my grandfather went away
together with his brother Avrom. They leaved 2 sisters in Kishinev,
Sara and Guize but few years after they worked and make some money
in Argentina, and they asked them to come and they did so. I was
checking several places trying also to find out what was the name of
the ship that they went away because we now a lot less about my
grandmother. If some one has any ideas please email me privately.

Shalom and Toda Raba (Thanks)

Sergio Tell
serg_tell@yahoo.com
Melbourne - Australia


Pinky GOLDSTEIN - local politician Buffalo , NY #general

Jules Feldman
 

Pinky GOLDSTEIN was a local politician in Buffalo , NY in the 1920s
and onwards.

He was a first or second cousin of Fanny MYERS (afterwards SNEIDER)
and paid for the ticket of either Fanny or her brother >from Lithuania
to South Africa.

I am looking for his descendants .

Will be grateful for any help >from this forum .

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pinky GOLDSTEIN - local politician Buffalo , NY #general

Jules Feldman
 

Pinky GOLDSTEIN was a local politician in Buffalo , NY in the 1920s
and onwards.

He was a first or second cousin of Fanny MYERS (afterwards SNEIDER)
and paid for the ticket of either Fanny or her brother >from Lithuania
to South Africa.

I am looking for his descendants .

Will be grateful for any help >from this forum .

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


Pne Joshua 1680-1756 #general

Marcel Apsel
 

I have placed this question several years ago. Could anybody who
is descendant of the Pne Joshua, Rabbi Jacob Joshua ben Zvi Hirsch,
sometimes also known under the family name FALK, born in Krakow
1680, died in Offenbach, Germany in 1756 and buried in Frankfurt
am Main get in touch with me privately.

Marcel Apsel
Antwerpen, Belgium

marcap@skynet.be


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pne Joshua 1680-1756 #general

Marcel Apsel
 

I have placed this question several years ago. Could anybody who
is descendant of the Pne Joshua, Rabbi Jacob Joshua ben Zvi Hirsch,
sometimes also known under the family name FALK, born in Krakow
1680, died in Offenbach, Germany in 1756 and buried in Frankfurt
am Main get in touch with me privately.

Marcel Apsel
Antwerpen, Belgium

marcap@skynet.be


Jewish Officers and Soldiers from Craiova, Romania, fallen during the Balkans Wars and WW I #general

MACSTA <macsta@...>
 

Dear all,

Those with roots in Craiova, Romania, will certainly find an
interest in the list of 62 Jewish officers and soldiers fallen
during the Balkan wars and WW I in 1913 and 1916-1919.
These names were copied >from memorial erected in Craiova.

The list is searchable at:
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/CraiovaSrchFrm.html

Having the photo of the monument, I am ready to send it to anyone
interested in.

Shalom,

Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Officers and Soldiers from Craiova, Romania, fallen during the Balkans Wars and WW I #general

MACSTA <macsta@...>
 

Dear all,

Those with roots in Craiova, Romania, will certainly find an
interest in the list of 62 Jewish officers and soldiers fallen
during the Balkan wars and WW I in 1913 and 1916-1919.
These names were copied >from memorial erected in Craiova.

The list is searchable at:
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/CraiovaSrchFrm.html

Having the photo of the monument, I am ready to send it to anyone
interested in.

Shalom,

Mathilde Tagger
Jerusalem