Date   

Manchester NH Hebrew Memorial Cemetery #general

Cindy Potter Taylor <knife-princess@...>
 

Genners,

If there is anyone in the Manchester, NH area who is available to photograph
a headstone for me at the Hebrew Memorial Cemetery, please email me.
Thank you in advance...

Cindy Potter Taylor
Boynton Beach, FL
knife-princess@att.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Manchester NH Hebrew Memorial Cemetery #general

Cindy Potter Taylor <knife-princess@...>
 

Genners,

If there is anyone in the Manchester, NH area who is available to photograph
a headstone for me at the Hebrew Memorial Cemetery, please email me.
Thank you in advance...

Cindy Potter Taylor
Boynton Beach, FL
knife-princess@att.net


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #germany

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman, JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator - December 2011


German SIG #Germany Holocaust Database Update Announcement #germany

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman, JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator - December 2011


ViewMate thank you to all responders #subcarpathia

Dick Plotz <Dick@...>
 

The ViewMate team has asked me to send out this thank you note.

Dick Plotz
Manager of Mailing Lists
JewishGen, Inc.

+++
Collaborative spirit reigns: We give thanks to the many
JewishGen-ViewMate volunteers who have offered translations and
commentary to help unpuzzle our past. Thanks to all for joining us in
this collaborative spirit. We really do appreciate your assistance.

ViewMate Team:
Sam Eneman
Bernard Kouchel
Gary Sandler


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #subcarpathia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia ViewMate thank you to all responders #subcarpathia

Dick Plotz <Dick@...>
 

The ViewMate team has asked me to send out this thank you note.

Dick Plotz
Manager of Mailing Lists
JewishGen, Inc.

+++
Collaborative spirit reigns: We give thanks to the many
JewishGen-ViewMate volunteers who have offered translations and
commentary to help unpuzzle our past. Thanks to all for joining us in
this collaborative spirit. We really do appreciate your assistance.

ViewMate Team:
Sam Eneman
Bernard Kouchel
Gary Sandler


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Holocaust Database Update Announcement #subcarpathia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Re: SOLOVEITCHIKS of Berditchev #rabbinic

Haskel and Sarah Benishay <h-benishay@...>
 

Perhaps they are connected to Levi Yitzhak of Berditchev.

Haskel and Sarah Benishay

On Dec 17, 2011, at 5:05 PM, Denkers wrote:

Is the city of Berditchev connected in any way with the Soloveitchiks?
Stephen Denker


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #rabbinic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: SOLOVEITCHIKS of Berditchev #rabbinic

Haskel and Sarah Benishay <h-benishay@...>
 

Perhaps they are connected to Levi Yitzhak of Berditchev.

Haskel and Sarah Benishay

On Dec 17, 2011, at 5:05 PM, Denkers wrote:

Is the city of Berditchev connected in any way with the Soloveitchiks?
Stephen Denker


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Holocaust Database Update Announcement #rabbinic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #scandinavia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #sephardic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Holocaust Database Update Announcement #scandinavia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Holocaust Database Update Announcement #sephardic

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #dna

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Holocaust Database Update Announcement #yizkorbooks

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Holocaust Database Update Announcement #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to present the 2011 recap of
JewishGen's Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

Since our last announcement, JewishGen's Holocaust Database has added
36 databases, accounting for more than 200,000 records. Ten databases
were added during 2011, comprising more than 120,000 records.
JewishGen's Holocaust Database now includes more than 2.4 million
records, >from more than 190 component databases. Some of the component
datasets added in 2011 are listed below.

When you perform your searches at the address above, you automatically
search all of the component databases. A listing of the component
databases with a description and link to each databases introduction
can be found by scrolling down the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships
with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Yad Vashem.
In addition to these two institutions, we have begun to receive
interesting original research by JewishGen users and academics.
We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the 'publishing' of
these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The introduction
will give you further information about the historical background of
the data, location of the original source document, fields used in the
database, translation aides where applicable, and acknowledgements to
those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation
of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:

* Assorted Romanian Lists. >from hundreds of source documents, these
lists range >from under ten handwritten names to pages of typed lists
for various Romanian towns during the Holocaust period. The project
introduction will explain how to find original source documents >from
the US Holocaust Memorial Museum -- approximately 73,000 records.

* Dutch Lists. A compilation of over 40 different source documents.
The lists include victims and survivors who were either Dutch by
nationality or were relocated to Holland after the war. The lists
were originally prepared by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam
-- more than 24,000 records.

* Miskolc, Hungary (and surrounding towns) Victims. John J. Kovacs
(a Miskolc survivor) undertook a project to commemorate the victims from
Miskolc and the surrounding area by creating this data set. The source
for this data set is the Jewish Community of Miskolc, which supplied the
lists to John. John's introduction includes the names of all the towns
included, information about Miskolc and a photo of his 4th grade class!
-- approximately 11,000 records.

* Piotrkow Trybunalski Ghetto Tax List. Larry Freund compiled the
data of almost 11,000 records representing those who paid taxes >from
1940 through early 1942. A copy of the lists were donated to the YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research by Ben Giladi, who received copies >from
the Piotrkow Trybunalski branch of the Polish National Archives --
approximately 11,000 records.

* Various Other Data Sets. Other 2011 data sets include Joel Waters'
work compiling victims >from Leova and the Cahul Camp, Kupiskis victims
primarily documented in 1946 by the midwife >from the Jewish Maternity
Hospital in Ponevezh, and Paul Silverstone's latest maritime data set
of Czech subjects interned in Mauritius.

--
More to come! In addition to these sets, we already have in
for review more than 29,000 records >from the Bergen-Belsen Book of
Remembrance, and close to 5,000 records for two Lublin, Poland
databases compiled by Robinn Magid. These sets should be processed
and go live after the first of the year.

To see all the added material, please see JewishGen's Holocaust
Database home page at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers
who have assisted in making this data available to you. Their
names are listed in the individual project introductions. If
you are interested in assisting with data entry, or have a
database you think would be appropriate for JewishGen's Holocaust
Database, please contact me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
December 2011

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