Date   

Additions to Holocaust Database #romania

bounce-1869664-772976@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Romania SIG #Romania Additions to Holocaust Database #romania

bounce-1869664-772976@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Re: OBERNDORFER -Possible Sources #germany

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

In such cases I always turn to Yad Vashem's Pages of Testimony.
Those pages include also German official deportation lists.
One rarely comes out empty handed. I saw there some leads.

Jacob Rosen Amman,Jordan abuwasta@yahoo.com

I'd appreciate receiving any information on OBERNDORFERs of Zirndorf,
Fuerth or Nuremberg or any suggestions as to possible sources.


German SIG #Germany re:OBERNDORFER -Possible Sources #germany

Abuwasta Abuwasta
 

In such cases I always turn to Yad Vashem's Pages of Testimony.
Those pages include also German official deportation lists.
One rarely comes out empty handed. I saw there some leads.

Jacob Rosen Amman,Jordan abuwasta@yahoo.com

I'd appreciate receiving any information on OBERNDORFERs of Zirndorf,
Fuerth or Nuremberg or any suggestions as to possible sources.


Seek book: Geschichte der Gesellschaft der Bruder #germany

Tom Heinersdorff <tom.heinersdorff@...>
 

Geschichte der Gesellschaft der Bruder [U umlaut]
Geschichte der Gesellschaft der Brueder

I would like to find and read the above book about the Jews of Breslau.

Can anybody lend me a copy or point me to where I could find a copy,
preferably in the UK?

Tom Heinersdorff London, UK tom.heinersdorff@btinternet.com


German SIG #Germany Seek book: Geschichte der Gesellschaft der Bruder #germany

Tom Heinersdorff <tom.heinersdorff@...>
 

Geschichte der Gesellschaft der Bruder [U umlaut]
Geschichte der Gesellschaft der Brueder

I would like to find and read the above book about the Jews of Breslau.

Can anybody lend me a copy or point me to where I could find a copy,
preferably in the UK?

Tom Heinersdorff London, UK tom.heinersdorff@btinternet.com


Searching for Surname Kroglansky #lithuania

Susan Welsh <suewelsh@...>
 

Hello fellow Litvaks!

I'm searching for other members of my paternal grandmother's family. The
surname is Kroglansky (or any variation). They lived in Merkine
(Lithuanian) /Meretch (Yiddish)/Merecz (Polish)/Merech(Russian), in the
Vilna Gobernia.

My great grandmother was Simcha (Sarah) Kroglansky. She was born circa
1844 and died in London, sometime after 1907. The family surname was
Anglicized to Taylor once they arrived in London, probably due to their
profession.

My great grandfather's name is not known. I believe it was Simeon or
Simon. He died prior to 1907 when my grandmother was married, since he
is not listed on her kitubot. I do not know where on when he died. It
might have been in Lithuania, or it might have been in London.

Known children include: Brinah, Rebecca (my grandmother), Yudice,
Morris, Isaac, and Kate original name unknown).

(1) Brinah married Jacob Karetsky and settled in London. She died in
1921 while in Cork, Ireland, after going to care for her son, Morris.
She probably died of the flu.

(2) Yudice married Morris Hisrchhaut (later Hirsch) and settled in
London, where many of her descendants remain.

(3) Morris died young in Cork, Ireland in 1921.

(4) Issac Tova moved to Sao Paolo, Brazil. He was married twice, and I
believe descendants are named Zinger. There may still be descendents in
Brazil.

(5) Rebecca married my grandfather, Morris Granite, and first lived in
Canada, later the USA.

(6) Kate - I know nothing about this sibling, having just discovered her
in a 1901 London census, living with Sarah (her mother) and Rebecca (her
sister), the youngest child.


If any of this sounds familiar, please contact me privately at
suewelsh@earthlink.net

Thanks!

Susan Welsh

Tracing the KROGLANSKY (Lithuania), TAYLOR (England and USA), GRANITE
(Ukraine, England, USA), ABERBUCH (Warsaw, Lublin), HABERMAN (Warsaw,
LUBLIN), and ZYLBERBERG (Warsaw, Lublin) families.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods and resources may be shared with
the list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Searching for Surname Kroglansky #lithuania

Susan Welsh <suewelsh@...>
 

Hello fellow Litvaks!

I'm searching for other members of my paternal grandmother's family. The
surname is Kroglansky (or any variation). They lived in Merkine
(Lithuanian) /Meretch (Yiddish)/Merecz (Polish)/Merech(Russian), in the
Vilna Gobernia.

My great grandmother was Simcha (Sarah) Kroglansky. She was born circa
1844 and died in London, sometime after 1907. The family surname was
Anglicized to Taylor once they arrived in London, probably due to their
profession.

My great grandfather's name is not known. I believe it was Simeon or
Simon. He died prior to 1907 when my grandmother was married, since he
is not listed on her kitubot. I do not know where on when he died. It
might have been in Lithuania, or it might have been in London.

Known children include: Brinah, Rebecca (my grandmother), Yudice,
Morris, Isaac, and Kate original name unknown).

(1) Brinah married Jacob Karetsky and settled in London. She died in
1921 while in Cork, Ireland, after going to care for her son, Morris.
She probably died of the flu.

(2) Yudice married Morris Hisrchhaut (later Hirsch) and settled in
London, where many of her descendants remain.

(3) Morris died young in Cork, Ireland in 1921.

(4) Issac Tova moved to Sao Paolo, Brazil. He was married twice, and I
believe descendants are named Zinger. There may still be descendents in
Brazil.

(5) Rebecca married my grandfather, Morris Granite, and first lived in
Canada, later the USA.

(6) Kate - I know nothing about this sibling, having just discovered her
in a 1901 London census, living with Sarah (her mother) and Rebecca (her
sister), the youngest child.


If any of this sounds familiar, please contact me privately at
suewelsh@earthlink.net

Thanks!

Susan Welsh

Tracing the KROGLANSKY (Lithuania), TAYLOR (England and USA), GRANITE
(Ukraine, England, USA), ABERBUCH (Warsaw, Lublin), HABERMAN (Warsaw,
LUBLIN), and ZYLBERBERG (Warsaw, Lublin) families.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately with family information.
Suggestions for research methods and resources may be shared with
the list.


Ancestral Homes #hungary

samara99@...
 

We want to make everyone aware of a program that we have had going on for
some time, in which individuals transcribe the birth, marriage and death
records for their smaller ancestral homes.

The vital records project, of necessity, tends to prioritize larger cities,
using the number of people researching a town as per the JGFF as a proxy for
size. This makes sense as the researchers in the JGFF are the source for
most of our transcribers and prioritizing larger towns benefits the most
people, i.e., the "biggest bang for the buck."

However, for some time now, H-SIGers whose ancestors have come >from smaller
towns and villages have been transcribing the records of their ancestral
towns on a single-handed basis. We have obtained the records for them.

In this manner, many towns have been done by individuals. These towns
include Ajaks, Apagy, Baja, Bezded, Dombrad, Duna-Szerdahely, Erdobenye,
Erdotelek, Gava, Hajdunanas, Mako, Mandok, Mateszalka, Moson, Nyirbogat,
Nyirkarasz, Olaszliszka, Orosvar, Rajka, Sarospatak, Sobrance, Szilsarkany,
and many others.

As you can see, this has been an active program resulting in major benefits
to Hungarian-Jewish genealogy.

We wish to make everyone aware of this program and we hope to encourage many
of you to undertake a similar effort. It is a great way to honor and
remember one's ancestors and the towns >from which they came.

If anyone is interested in pursuing this program, contact me at the email
below (off-list, please). We will assist you in investigating the
availability of these records, as well as determining the magnitude of the
task. In a number of cases, where the size of the job is too big for one
person, you might do a significant portion of the records, while we would
obtain others to do the rest.

We will provide considerable assistance and guidance as needed. There is a
lead-time of six to twelve months required.

We hope you decide to pursue this means of honoring and remembering your
ancestors.

Sam Schleman
Project Coordinator
Hungarian Vital Records Project
Samara99@verizon.net


Hungary SIG #Hungary Ancestral Homes #hungary

samara99@...
 

We want to make everyone aware of a program that we have had going on for
some time, in which individuals transcribe the birth, marriage and death
records for their smaller ancestral homes.

The vital records project, of necessity, tends to prioritize larger cities,
using the number of people researching a town as per the JGFF as a proxy for
size. This makes sense as the researchers in the JGFF are the source for
most of our transcribers and prioritizing larger towns benefits the most
people, i.e., the "biggest bang for the buck."

However, for some time now, H-SIGers whose ancestors have come >from smaller
towns and villages have been transcribing the records of their ancestral
towns on a single-handed basis. We have obtained the records for them.

In this manner, many towns have been done by individuals. These towns
include Ajaks, Apagy, Baja, Bezded, Dombrad, Duna-Szerdahely, Erdobenye,
Erdotelek, Gava, Hajdunanas, Mako, Mandok, Mateszalka, Moson, Nyirbogat,
Nyirkarasz, Olaszliszka, Orosvar, Rajka, Sarospatak, Sobrance, Szilsarkany,
and many others.

As you can see, this has been an active program resulting in major benefits
to Hungarian-Jewish genealogy.

We wish to make everyone aware of this program and we hope to encourage many
of you to undertake a similar effort. It is a great way to honor and
remember one's ancestors and the towns >from which they came.

If anyone is interested in pursuing this program, contact me at the email
below (off-list, please). We will assist you in investigating the
availability of these records, as well as determining the magnitude of the
task. In a number of cases, where the size of the job is too big for one
person, you might do a significant portion of the records, while we would
obtain others to do the rest.

We will provide considerable assistance and guidance as needed. There is a
lead-time of six to twelve months required.

We hope you decide to pursue this means of honoring and remembering your
ancestors.

Sam Schleman
Project Coordinator
Hungarian Vital Records Project
Samara99@verizon.net


Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #hungary

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Hungary SIG #Hungary Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #hungary

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement with the
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research Room will provide
access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The indices to these
records are online at:
Blitzstein Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm
Lipshutz Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm
Rosenbaum Bank - http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you when you
come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may still use the
indices in order to request records directly >from PJAC at their new
location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept conference
visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the conference week, who
wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more information than
the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Additions to Holocaust Database #hungary

bounce-1869664-772961@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Hungary SIG #Hungary Additions to Holocaust Database #hungary

bounce-1869664-772961@...
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference update
to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ This
update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen Holocaust
Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new component
databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen Holocaust
Database. (When you perform your searches at the address above, you
automatically search all of the component databases.) The JewishGen
Holocaust Database now contains in excess of 160 component databases.
A listing of each of the component databases with descriptions and
links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down
the main search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us, especially
for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two institutions,
we have begun receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location
for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the historical
background of the list, location of the original source document,
fields used in the database, translation aides when applicable and
acknowledgements to those that helped with data entry, validation and
online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over 15,000
records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and non-Jewish
records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from 1939 through 1944
-- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added, 1)
Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and January
1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into the Lublin
area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from the
work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto residents.
Additional installments to this database will be made as data is
verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen, Germany /
Poland) . Data >from 5 separate lists which include information on
over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports involving Riese,
Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants (OSE),
a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved hundreds of
refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers captured
by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from Pinsk
and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and Konotop in
the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like to
extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in assisting
data entry or have a database at you think would be appropriate for
the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact me directly at
naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #galicia

A. Krauss <avkrauss@...>
 

You are quite right about 'Isser' being a Yiddish form of
'Yisroel.' On the other hand, it is/was not used for 'Yissachar.'
'Ber' and its various forms (Berisch, Ber'l, Berek) is/was common
for Yissachar. Also, Sochor, Sucher, etc. are shortened Yiddish
versions of 'Yissachar."

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel

Karen Roekard wrote:

I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for
"Israel" or "Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on
it there are both the name "Isser" and "Israel" but no
"Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if "Isser"
is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for
"Yissacher." Any thoughts??


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: name "Isser" - is this a diminutive of "Yissacher"? #galicia

A. Krauss <avkrauss@...>
 

You are quite right about 'Isser' being a Yiddish form of
'Yisroel.' On the other hand, it is/was not used for 'Yissachar.'
'Ber' and its various forms (Berisch, Ber'l, Berek) is/was common
for Yissachar. Also, Sochor, Sucher, etc. are shortened Yiddish
versions of 'Yissachar."

Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel

Karen Roekard wrote:

I have been told that in Russia, "Isser" was the diminutive for
"Israel" or "Yisroel." I have a list of people >from Galicia and on
it there are both the name "Isser" and "Israel" but no
"Yissacher". This began me thinking and wondering if "Isser"
is/was used in the Galizaianer world as the diminutive for
"Yissacher." Any thoughts??


Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #galicia

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement
with the Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research
Room will provide access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The
indices to these records are online at:

Blitzstein Bank
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm

Lipshutz Bank
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm

Rosenbaum Bank
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you
when you come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may
still use the indices in order to request records directly >from
PJAC at their new location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept
conference visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the
conference week, who wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more
information than the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Important IAJGS Conference Resource Announcement #galicia

David Mink
 

We are pleased to announce that through a special arrangement
with the Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center (PJAC) the Research
Room will provide access to the following record groups:

1. All of the Philadelphia Jewish Ethnic Bank records. The
indices to these records are online at:

Blitzstein Bank
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaBlitzstein.htm

Lipshutz Bank
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaLipshutz.htm

Rosenbaum Bank
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/USA/PhilaRosenbaum.htm

You will save time by creating your list and having it with you
when you come to Philadelphia.

Please be advised that those not attending the conference may
still use the indices in order to request records directly >from
PJAC at their new location.
Philadelphia Jewish Archives Center at Temple University Urban Archives
Samuel Paley Library
210 W Berks St
Philadelphia, PA 19122-6088

2. HIAS Passenger Lists 1884 - 1892

3. HIAS Arrival Records by Ship

4. HIAS Naturalization Cards

5. HIAS Port Cards

6. HIAS Immigration Records

7. WPA - Jewish Congregation Survey - 1930s

In addition PJAC at the Urban Archives is prepared to accept
conference visitors, on Mon. thru Thurs. (1:00pm - 5:00pm) of the
conference week, who wish to access the following record groups:

1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTRE records
Regarding aid to families in crisis or with special needs.

2. NATIONAL COUNCIL of JEWISH WOMEN records
These are cards which were created when aiding immigrants in the
naturalization process. The records sometimes contain more
information than the naturalization documents themselves.

See you in Philly!

Mark Halpern and Lois Sernoff


Additions to Holocaust Database #galicia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference
update to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be
accessed directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/
This update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen
Holocaust Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new
component databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen
Holocaust Database. (When you perform your searches at the
address above, you automatically search all of the component
databases.) The JewishGen Holocaust Database now contains in
excess of 160 component databases. A listing of each of the
component databases with descriptions and links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down the main
search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us,
especially for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two
institutions, we have begun receiving interesting original
research by JewishGen users and academicians. We believe JewishGen
is an ideal location for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the
historical background of the list, location of the original source
document, fields used in the database, translation aides when
applicable and acknowledgements to those that helped with data
entry, validation and online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component
databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over
15,000 records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and
non-Jewish records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from
1939 through 1944 -- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added,
1) Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and
January 1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into
the Lublin area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from
the work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto
residents. Additional installments to this database will be made
as data is verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen,
Germany / Poland). Data >from 5 separate lists which include
information on over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports
involving Riese, Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants
(OSE), a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved
hundreds of refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and 1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers
captured by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from
Pinsk and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and
Konotop in the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like
to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in
assisting data entry or have a database at you think would be
appropriate for the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact
me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Additions to Holocaust Database #galicia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce its 2009 pre-Conference
update to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be
accessed directly at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/
This update includes more than 93,000 new records. The JewishGen
Holocaust Database holdings now exceed of 2 million records!

Since last year's conference, we have added 26 new
component databases and 5 necrologies to the greater JewishGen
Holocaust Database. (When you perform your searches at the
address above, you automatically search all of the component
databases.) The JewishGen Holocaust Database now contains in
excess of 160 component databases. A listing of each of the
component databases with descriptions and links to each project's introduction can be found by scrolling down the main
search page address listed above.

The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to the
partnership with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yad
Vashem is another valuable source of information for us,
especially for Yizkor book necrologies. In addition to these two
institutions, we have begun receiving interesting original
research by JewishGen users and academicians. We believe JewishGen
is an ideal location for the "publishing" of these pieces.

All component databases have a project introduction. The
introduction will give you further information about the
historical background of the list, location of the original source
document, fields used in the database, translation aides when
applicable and acknowledgements to those that helped with data
entry, validation and online preparation of the list.

Among the additions this year are the following component
databases:
- Miranda de Ebro Prisoners (Miranda de Ebro, Spain). This
camp was central camp in Spain for foreign prisoners. -- over
15,000 records.
- Radom Prison Records (Radom, Poland). Jewish and
non-Jewish records of prisoners held in the city's prison >from
1939 through 1944 -- over 14,000 records.
- 1942 Arad Census (Arad, Transylvania, Romania). The Arad
census is unique for two reasons 1) there are no other Jewish
censuses >from other towns, and 2) most of the Jewish population in
Arad fortunately survived, unlike the Jewish population of so many
other Romanian towns -- over 9,600 records.
- Lublin Lists (Lublin, Poland). Two lists have been added,
1) Initial Registration of Lublin's Jews in October 1939 and
January 1940 and 2) Stettin (Szczecin) Jewish deportations into
the Lublin area -- over 7,600 records.
- Lodz Ghetto Work Cards (Lodz, Poland). Information >from
the work identification cards for over 5,600 Lodz Ghetto
residents. Additional installments to this database will be made
as data is verified.
- Riese and Gross Rosen Records (Riese / Gross Rosen,
Germany / Poland). Data >from 5 separate lists which include
information on over 4,800 forced laborers and prisoner transports
involving Riese, Gross Rosen, Auschwitz and Tannhausen camps.
- French Hidden Children. A partial listing of over 4,000
children >from the records of the Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants
(OSE), a French Jewish humanitarian organization that saved
hundreds of refugee children during WW II.
- Cernauti, Romania / Chernivsti, Ukraine Lists. Close to
4,000 records >from 61 different lists regarding residents of this
town between 1940 and 1943.
- Polish Jewish Prisoners of War. Almost 3,000 records >from
the Jewish Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw of soldiers
captured by the Germans and held at various Wehrmacht camps.
- Yizkor Book Necrologies. More than 8,000 records >from
Pinsk and Shchuchyn in Belarus, Suwalki and Lublin in Poland and
Konotop in the Ukraine.

To see all the added material, please see the JewishGen
Holocaust Database home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ We would also like
to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have assisted in
making this data available to you. Their names are listed in the
individual project introductions. If you are interested in
assisting data entry or have a database at you think would be
appropriate for the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please contact
me directly at naltman@jewishgen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
Jul 2009