Date   

what NY high school? #general

Paul Silverstone
 

My father was born in 1902 in New York and went to PS 184 in Harlem, New
York City. He told me he then went to DeWitt Clinton High School, but a
preliminary search has not found him. I also have reason to think he
went to Commerce HS, but similarly he has not been found. He did not
go to college, but in 1920 was working for a newsreel company.
He told me he was on the track team.
I would like to view yearbooks for those two high school for the years
1915 to 1920. Can anyone tell me where they might be?
Alternatively is there some other place that one can look at?

--
Paul Silverstone
New York
please reply to paulh@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen what NY high school? #general

Paul Silverstone
 

My father was born in 1902 in New York and went to PS 184 in Harlem, New
York City. He told me he then went to DeWitt Clinton High School, but a
preliminary search has not found him. I also have reason to think he
went to Commerce HS, but similarly he has not been found. He did not
go to college, but in 1920 was working for a newsreel company.
He told me he was on the track team.
I would like to view yearbooks for those two high school for the years
1915 to 1920. Can anyone tell me where they might be?
Alternatively is there some other place that one can look at?

--
Paul Silverstone
New York
please reply to paulh@...


Fascinating project at old cemetery in Alsace #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

from the Dec. 14 Jewish Forward here is a link to an article about a
fascinating project now underway at an old Jewish Cemetery, dating back
to 1669, in Mackenheim (Bas-Rhin) France. It is a fascinating idea.

http://tinyurl.com/bw44wuz

Rosanne Leeson


French SIG #France Fascinating project at old cemetery in Alsace #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

from the Dec. 14 Jewish Forward here is a link to an article about a
fascinating project now underway at an old Jewish Cemetery, dating back
to 1669, in Mackenheim (Bas-Rhin) France. It is a fascinating idea.

http://tinyurl.com/bw44wuz

Rosanne Leeson


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Mordechai "gaon Av Bet-Din" of Karlin 19th cent. #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

According to the diary (in hebrew) of my ggreatuncle, Reb Chaim Dov
KANTOR, of Karlin, and Shfeya (Israel), his mother's"she'er basar"
(relative) was a "gaba"d" (gaon av bet din) of Karlin during the
second half of the 19th cent. In the handwritten original diary the
family name of this Mordechai seems to be RUDINER, but researching the
various Mordechais that served in Karlin around this time it may have
been RUZINER (>from Ruzhin).

In the research I have done on Rabbi in Karlin of the 19th century I
have found no RUDINER but there was a Mordechai ZACKHEIM who served
in Karlin (or possibly Pinsk) around that time and he had served
before in Ruzhin.

There is a family tradition (legend?) that our gggreatgrandmother was
a descendant of Reb. Chaim of Volozhin and to the best of my knowledge
Reb. Mordechai ZACKHEIM also studied in Volozhin, but I don't know of
a family connection between him and Reb. Chaim.

If anyone can comment on information about Reb. Mordechai ZACKHEIM or
any other "Mordechais" who served in Karlin (or Pinsk) during the
third quarter of the 19th century or know of a connection between
Mordechai ZACKHEIM and Reb. Chaim I would be happy to hear >from you.

Thank you and Shabbat shalom, Chodesh Tov and Chanuka sameach.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Rabbi Mordechai "gaon Av Bet-Din" of Karlin 19th cent. #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

According to the diary (in hebrew) of my ggreatuncle, Reb Chaim Dov
KANTOR, of Karlin, and Shfeya (Israel), his mother's"she'er basar"
(relative) was a "gaba"d" (gaon av bet din) of Karlin during the
second half of the 19th cent. In the handwritten original diary the
family name of this Mordechai seems to be RUDINER, but researching the
various Mordechais that served in Karlin around this time it may have
been RUZINER (>from Ruzhin).

In the research I have done on Rabbi in Karlin of the 19th century I
have found no RUDINER but there was a Mordechai ZACKHEIM who served
in Karlin (or possibly Pinsk) around that time and he had served
before in Ruzhin.

There is a family tradition (legend?) that our gggreatgrandmother was
a descendant of Reb. Chaim of Volozhin and to the best of my knowledge
Reb. Mordechai ZACKHEIM also studied in Volozhin, but I don't know of
a family connection between him and Reb. Chaim.

If anyone can comment on information about Reb. Mordechai ZACKHEIM or
any other "Mordechais" who served in Karlin (or Pinsk) during the
third quarter of the 19th century or know of a connection between
Mordechai ZACKHEIM and Reb. Chaim I would be happy to hear >from you.

Thank you and Shabbat shalom, Chodesh Tov and Chanuka sameach.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


Re: FTDNA analysis question #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Alison,

The other comments are right. However, the two Greengards tested may only
be different on two Y-DNA markers. DYS 464 has 4 or more copies and are
listed in order of size. One mutation on one copy could change multiple
markers values. This happened in my subclade, J2b2e, when 464b, 464c and
464d was changed by a single mutation. DYS 464 and CDY are two of the
fastest mutating markers, so the STRs values you have does not rule out
your relationship with the other Greengard.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA

From: Alison Greengard <aligreengard@...>
Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2012 19:57:01 +0000 (UTC

I am new to DNA anlysis and am hoping someone can solve a puzzle in my
husband's FTDNA results. My husband's last name is GREENGARD. Over the
years we have collected numerous Greengard trees (that all point to an
origin of Virbalis, Lithuania and also point to them being one family) but
have had a hard time connecting the trees. Several of the Greengard
descendants can go back to their 3rd
gr-grandfather , but with my husband Tom we can only go back to his
gr-grandfather. We've made some progress, but decided to have two male
Greengard surname descendants test their Y-DNA-37 markers at FTDNA. One
is my husband Tom and the other is another Greengard.

The results are as follows:

The other Greengard descendant shows up as a potential 2nd to 4th cousin
of Tom in Family Finder. In the actual 37 marker charts, Tom and this
other Greengard differ on DYS464c, DYS464d and DYS CDYb. This makes sense
to me.

However, another individual with a completely different surname
shows up as an exact Y-DNA37 marker match. But he and Tom do not show
up as related in Family Finder. This individual can trace his lineage via
his different surname back to the 1750's. Interestingly, this individual
traces his lineage also back to Virbalis, and his ancestors stayed with
Greengards in NY when they first come to the US.

Can anyone explain why someone with a different surname, has an exact
Y-DNA 37 marker match with my husband, can trace his lineage via that
other surname back to the 1750's, yet doesn't show up in Family
Finder? Clearly there is some tie to the Greengards since his
ancestors stayed with Greengards in NY upon emigrating.


DNA Research #DNA re: FTDNA analysis question #dna

Arline and Sidney Sachs
 

Alison,

The other comments are right. However, the two Greengards tested may only
be different on two Y-DNA markers. DYS 464 has 4 or more copies and are
listed in order of size. One mutation on one copy could change multiple
markers values. This happened in my subclade, J2b2e, when 464b, 464c and
464d was changed by a single mutation. DYS 464 and CDY are two of the
fastest mutating markers, so the STRs values you have does not rule out
your relationship with the other Greengard.

Sidney Sachs
Lorton, VA

From: Alison Greengard <aligreengard@...>
Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2012 19:57:01 +0000 (UTC

I am new to DNA anlysis and am hoping someone can solve a puzzle in my
husband's FTDNA results. My husband's last name is GREENGARD. Over the
years we have collected numerous Greengard trees (that all point to an
origin of Virbalis, Lithuania and also point to them being one family) but
have had a hard time connecting the trees. Several of the Greengard
descendants can go back to their 3rd
gr-grandfather , but with my husband Tom we can only go back to his
gr-grandfather. We've made some progress, but decided to have two male
Greengard surname descendants test their Y-DNA-37 markers at FTDNA. One
is my husband Tom and the other is another Greengard.

The results are as follows:

The other Greengard descendant shows up as a potential 2nd to 4th cousin
of Tom in Family Finder. In the actual 37 marker charts, Tom and this
other Greengard differ on DYS464c, DYS464d and DYS CDYb. This makes sense
to me.

However, another individual with a completely different surname
shows up as an exact Y-DNA37 marker match. But he and Tom do not show
up as related in Family Finder. This individual can trace his lineage via
his different surname back to the 1750's. Interestingly, this individual
traces his lineage also back to Virbalis, and his ancestors stayed with
Greengards in NY when they first come to the US.

Can anyone explain why someone with a different surname, has an exact
Y-DNA 37 marker match with my husband, can trace his lineage via that
other surname back to the 1750's, yet doesn't show up in Family
Finder? Clearly there is some tie to the Greengards since his
ancestors stayed with Greengards in NY upon emigrating.


Book to read written Yiddish? #general

Rachel S Goodman
 

Dear Friends,
I have several letters written in Yiddish between my great-grandfather
in pre-war Eishishok and my grandparents in Massachusetts. I would
like to know if there is a book or a website that teaches how to read
written Yiddish. I suppose I could use an online dictionary that would
translate the words, but first I have to make out the letters. Any
suggestions helpful. I don't think the ViewMate would be useful, as
the script is very small and the paper is smudged and torn over all
these years.
Very Best
Rachel S Goodman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Book to read written Yiddish? #general

Rachel S Goodman
 

Dear Friends,
I have several letters written in Yiddish between my great-grandfather
in pre-war Eishishok and my grandparents in Massachusetts. I would
like to know if there is a book or a website that teaches how to read
written Yiddish. I suppose I could use an online dictionary that would
translate the words, but first I have to make out the letters. Any
suggestions helpful. I don't think the ViewMate would be useful, as
the script is very small and the paper is smudged and torn over all
these years.
Very Best
Rachel S Goodman


Re: Finding my Great Grandfather #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Wayne,

Welcome!

Two points to begin with:

1) "Always" is rarely the case when it comes to things like naming
practices. Jews *often* used initials that sounded like the initials of
their previous surnames, but so many other factors could play into the
decision. For instance:
--Many immigrants had never spelled their names in Latin letters before
they bought their steamship tickets. Cyrillic, Hebrew/Yiddish,
sure--but the very concept of "same initial"--let alone "correct
spelling"--may not apply.
--Some families in the Russian Empire had sons who assumed different
surnames as part of their effort to avoid conscription. Changing a
surname in the new country could have been a *return* to a previous
surname, or yet another change >from a temporary name.
--Others changed surnames simply because they didn't want to be
associated with someone else who had the old surname, or because they
*did* want to be associated with someone, famous or otherwise.
--Still others used their surnames to advertise their trades, so MILLER,
BAKER, etc.--or their equivalents in Yiddish, Russian or another
language--might have been either the old or the new name.
--In many cases we'll never know. A friend's family went >from CHEIFETZ
to BROOK. Another friend's ancestor took the train to Hamburg, and his
first stop after crossing the border out of Russian Poland was Bromberg;
he liked the look of the place--not that he even stepped out onto the
platform--so he and his family became BROMBERGs.

2) The borders of Eastern Europe--at least in the northern parts--were
essentially static >from 1815 to 1918. The "fluid borders" story is
something of a myth unless you're talking about the crazy period after
the end of World War I. So if your grandfather came >from Grodno, he
came >from Lithuania, which was part of the Russian Empire. Grodno is
now Hrodno in Belarus, and between the world wars it was part of the
newly created Poland. But in the years between his birth and his
emigration, it was the same place in terms of political geography.

Alas, "Grodno" can mean two things: the city or the Gubernia
(administrative district) of which it was the capital. Many, many
emigrants described their origins in terms of the gubernia, not the city
or village--just as we might do when we're far >from home.
---
If your grandfather became a US citizen there should be a highly
informative record of the event, especially given the late date of his
arrival. (Before 1906 things are a little trickier and sometimes not as
informative.) His Petition for Naturalization is the first thing you
should seek out. It could tell you about his entry to the US, his town
of origin and more. Sometimes there are supporting documents with
surprising content as well.

>from a different angle, you could pursue the surname. Some surnames
were more common than others, and JAKAROVICH (however spelled--we have
phonetic searches to handle the uncertainty) seems to be one of the
others. So you could consult works such as Alexander Beider's
dictionaries of Jewish surnames to see where people with similar names
might have lived.

But the most important thing of all is to find other people who either
know what you want to know, or are asking similar questions. This is
where the JewishGen Family Finder comes in. Go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/, register as a member of JewishGen if you
haven't already (it's free), and then enter your queries as
surname-place pairs, e.g., TENNER/Hrodno, JAKAROVICH/Hrodno, etc. This
will allow others to find you, just as the Family Finder's search engine
will allow you to find people who are researching surnames that sound
like the ones you're working on.

Over 100,000 researchers have entered names and places into the Family
Finder. That's a number approaching the equivalent of 1% of all the
Jews in the world, and I'm not even counting their immediate families.
Which is to say, word will get out that you're looking, and you can
contact others who have indicated their interest.

Best of luck, and do let us know what you find and what other questions
arise.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 12/13/2012 12:42 PM, G. Wayne Jackson wrote:
Hello Jewish Geneology,

I need some instruction/help in conducting Jewish Geneology research
for my Great-Grandfather. Although not new to geneological research,
I'm having problems with finding information about my Jewish Ancestry.
I just don't know where to begin my research. Most of the information
came to me >from "sitting shiva" notes taken at the time of my
grandfathers death.

Here's what I have so far:
...

from the stories I have been told, my Grandfather, Benjamin Tenner,
possibly entered the US through Canada (US POE is unknown). It
appears that he changed his surname on the ship coming to either
Canada or the US. If that is the case, then his name change would
not be keeping with tradition. It is my understanding that when
Jewish persons change their surname, they would always start the new
surname with the first letter of their original surname (i.e.
Wasserman, Waterman, Walters - as in Barbara Walters).

Additional difficulties have arisen due to not knowing exactly what
town/country my grandfather came from. I have four pieces of
documentatioin stating that his country of birth was one of the four
listed above. I believe that at the time of his birth, the country
borders were quite fluid and changed based upon the government
controlling that area.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Finding my Great Grandfather #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Wayne,

Welcome!

Two points to begin with:

1) "Always" is rarely the case when it comes to things like naming
practices. Jews *often* used initials that sounded like the initials of
their previous surnames, but so many other factors could play into the
decision. For instance:
--Many immigrants had never spelled their names in Latin letters before
they bought their steamship tickets. Cyrillic, Hebrew/Yiddish,
sure--but the very concept of "same initial"--let alone "correct
spelling"--may not apply.
--Some families in the Russian Empire had sons who assumed different
surnames as part of their effort to avoid conscription. Changing a
surname in the new country could have been a *return* to a previous
surname, or yet another change >from a temporary name.
--Others changed surnames simply because they didn't want to be
associated with someone else who had the old surname, or because they
*did* want to be associated with someone, famous or otherwise.
--Still others used their surnames to advertise their trades, so MILLER,
BAKER, etc.--or their equivalents in Yiddish, Russian or another
language--might have been either the old or the new name.
--In many cases we'll never know. A friend's family went >from CHEIFETZ
to BROOK. Another friend's ancestor took the train to Hamburg, and his
first stop after crossing the border out of Russian Poland was Bromberg;
he liked the look of the place--not that he even stepped out onto the
platform--so he and his family became BROMBERGs.

2) The borders of Eastern Europe--at least in the northern parts--were
essentially static >from 1815 to 1918. The "fluid borders" story is
something of a myth unless you're talking about the crazy period after
the end of World War I. So if your grandfather came >from Grodno, he
came >from Lithuania, which was part of the Russian Empire. Grodno is
now Hrodno in Belarus, and between the world wars it was part of the
newly created Poland. But in the years between his birth and his
emigration, it was the same place in terms of political geography.

Alas, "Grodno" can mean two things: the city or the Gubernia
(administrative district) of which it was the capital. Many, many
emigrants described their origins in terms of the gubernia, not the city
or village--just as we might do when we're far >from home.
---
If your grandfather became a US citizen there should be a highly
informative record of the event, especially given the late date of his
arrival. (Before 1906 things are a little trickier and sometimes not as
informative.) His Petition for Naturalization is the first thing you
should seek out. It could tell you about his entry to the US, his town
of origin and more. Sometimes there are supporting documents with
surprising content as well.

>from a different angle, you could pursue the surname. Some surnames
were more common than others, and JAKAROVICH (however spelled--we have
phonetic searches to handle the uncertainty) seems to be one of the
others. So you could consult works such as Alexander Beider's
dictionaries of Jewish surnames to see where people with similar names
might have lived.

But the most important thing of all is to find other people who either
know what you want to know, or are asking similar questions. This is
where the JewishGen Family Finder comes in. Go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/, register as a member of JewishGen if you
haven't already (it's free), and then enter your queries as
surname-place pairs, e.g., TENNER/Hrodno, JAKAROVICH/Hrodno, etc. This
will allow others to find you, just as the Family Finder's search engine
will allow you to find people who are researching surnames that sound
like the ones you're working on.

Over 100,000 researchers have entered names and places into the Family
Finder. That's a number approaching the equivalent of 1% of all the
Jews in the world, and I'm not even counting their immediate families.
Which is to say, word will get out that you're looking, and you can
contact others who have indicated their interest.

Best of luck, and do let us know what you find and what other questions
arise.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

On 12/13/2012 12:42 PM, G. Wayne Jackson wrote:
Hello Jewish Geneology,

I need some instruction/help in conducting Jewish Geneology research
for my Great-Grandfather. Although not new to geneological research,
I'm having problems with finding information about my Jewish Ancestry.
I just don't know where to begin my research. Most of the information
came to me >from "sitting shiva" notes taken at the time of my
grandfathers death.

Here's what I have so far:
...

from the stories I have been told, my Grandfather, Benjamin Tenner,
possibly entered the US through Canada (US POE is unknown). It
appears that he changed his surname on the ship coming to either
Canada or the US. If that is the case, then his name change would
not be keeping with tradition. It is my understanding that when
Jewish persons change their surname, they would always start the new
surname with the first letter of their original surname (i.e.
Wasserman, Waterman, Walters - as in Barbara Walters).

Additional difficulties have arisen due to not knowing exactly what
town/country my grandfather came from. I have four pieces of
documentatioin stating that his country of birth was one of the four
listed above. I believe that at the time of his birth, the country
borders were quite fluid and changed based upon the government
controlling that area.


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Samuel Grosz, Nagyszo"llo"s #subcarpathia

Alex Magocsi
 

I am researching my Grosz lineage and need some guidance.

Samuel Grosz was born abt 1854 in Nagyszollos and died on 24 May 1899
in Nyirbator.

His parents were reportedly Abraham Eliezer Grosz and Ester Trager.

Does anyone on this list have experience chasing family history >from the
period prior to 1860 in Nagyszollos?

I feel sometimes that my time may be better spent chasing more modern
documentation.

Regards, Alex


Samuel Grosz, Nagyszo"llo"s #subcarpathia

Alex Magocsi
 

I am researching my Grosz lineage and need some guidance.

Samuel Grosz was born abt 1854 in Nagyszollos and died on 24 May 1899
in Nyirbator.

His parents were reportedly Abraham Eliezer Grosz and Ester Trager.

Does anyone on this list have experience chasing family history >from the
period prior to 1860 in Nagyszollos?

I feel sometimes that my time may be better spent chasing more modern
documentation.

Regards, Alex


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Short videos about Genealogy & JewishGen #subcarpathia

Phyllis Kramer
 

Just a reminder that we have created a series of 5 minute videos which
might interest some readers.

Prepare For Your Search (for USA researchers)
Navigate JewishGen
Find Your Ancestral Town (for USA researchers)
Communicate with Other Researchers:
JGFF: The JewishGen Family Finder -- for Surnames/Towns
FTJP: Family Tree of the Jewish People -- for over 5 million people
JewishGen Discussion Groups
Hosted Organizations: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part I (JewishGen and IAJGS/JGS) and Part II

You can find them on the first timers page
(http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/FirstTimer.html) and at the bottom
of the education page (www.jewishgen.org/education)
--
Isn't JewishGen wonderful!
Phyllis Kramer
VP, Education: www.JewishGen.org/education
family web site: www.KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia HTML volunteers needed for the KehilaLinks Project #subcarpathia

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Dear Friends,

Although we have a wonderful team of dedicated and overworked
volunteers, there are not enough of them and prospective webpage
owners have to wait for months to get technical help.

Our webpages are "Virtual Yizkor Books". Just as former residents
took it upon themselves to record all they could remember and publish
a Yizkor Book in memory of their Jewish community , so we, the next
generation, should make sure that whatever we have, every little bit
of information that sheds light on the lives of our Jewish
communities is recorded and preserved. The people who published
Yizkor Books usually were in contact with others living in the same
town or country. Contact with their landsmen in other countries was
difficult. To us, in the 21st century, there are no limitations.
Cyberspace has opened up the world to us.

If you have the necessary skills we urge you to volunteer and help
someone create a webpage dedicated to a Kehila / Shtetl / Gemeinde /
Town / Immigrant Neighbourhood, and in
this way honour and memorialize the Jewish community that once lived
there and also provide a valuable resource for their descendants.

Please contact us : <bloch@...>

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Short videos about Genealogy & JewishGen #subcarpathia

Phyllis Kramer
 

Just a reminder that we have created a series of 5 minute videos which
might interest some readers.

Prepare For Your Search (for USA researchers)
Navigate JewishGen
Find Your Ancestral Town (for USA researchers)
Communicate with Other Researchers:
JGFF: The JewishGen Family Finder -- for Surnames/Towns
FTJP: Family Tree of the Jewish People -- for over 5 million people
JewishGen Discussion Groups
Hosted Organizations: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part I (JewishGen and IAJGS/JGS) and Part II

You can find them on the first timers page
(http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/FirstTimer.html) and at the bottom
of the education page (www.jewishgen.org/education)
--
Isn't JewishGen wonderful!
Phyllis Kramer
VP, Education: www.JewishGen.org/education
family web site: www.KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


HTML volunteers needed for the KehilaLinks Project #subcarpathia

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Dear Friends,

Although we have a wonderful team of dedicated and overworked
volunteers, there are not enough of them and prospective webpage
owners have to wait for months to get technical help.

Our webpages are "Virtual Yizkor Books". Just as former residents
took it upon themselves to record all they could remember and publish
a Yizkor Book in memory of their Jewish community , so we, the next
generation, should make sure that whatever we have, every little bit
of information that sheds light on the lives of our Jewish
communities is recorded and preserved. The people who published
Yizkor Books usually were in contact with others living in the same
town or country. Contact with their landsmen in other countries was
difficult. To us, in the 21st century, there are no limitations.
Cyberspace has opened up the world to us.

If you have the necessary skills we urge you to volunteer and help
someone create a webpage dedicated to a Kehila / Shtetl / Gemeinde /
Town / Immigrant Neighbourhood, and in
this way honour and memorialize the Jewish community that once lived
there and also provide a valuable resource for their descendants.

Please contact us : <bloch@...>

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania FELDSER - more research aids #lithuania

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

Ann Rabinowitz had done a fabulous job of using the information in one
record to work up a family tree. But she has stopped too quickly!

The Southern Israelite was a newspaper featuring the lives of the Jews
in the South >from 1925 to 1986 (when its name was changed). The Digital
Library of Georgia has digitized issues of the Southern Israelite for
the years 1929 to 1986. You can search it at:
http://israelite.galileo.usg.edu/israelite/search

When I searched for FELDSER, I found several pages of references,
including Max's obituary, several daughter's wedding announcements (a
great source of married names for women!), and various vacations of
Jewish organization chairmanships for family members.

The Southern Israelite covered social news >from across the South, if you
are looking for family south of the Mason Dixon line, you should give it
a try.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Atlanta, Georgia


FELDSER - more research aids #lithuania

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

Ann Rabinowitz had done a fabulous job of using the information in one
record to work up a family tree. But she has stopped too quickly!

The Southern Israelite was a newspaper featuring the lives of the Jews
in the South >from 1925 to 1986 (when its name was changed). The Digital
Library of Georgia has digitized issues of the Southern Israelite for
the years 1929 to 1986. You can search it at:
http://israelite.galileo.usg.edu/israelite/search

When I searched for FELDSER, I found several pages of references,
including Max's obituary, several daughter's wedding announcements (a
great source of married names for women!), and various vacations of
Jewish organization chairmanships for family members.

The Southern Israelite covered social news >from across the South, if you
are looking for family south of the Mason Dixon line, you should give it
a try.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Atlanta, Georgia

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