Date   

ShtetLinks Project Report for November 2009 #austria-czech

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen ShtetLinks.
We thank the owners and webmasters of these shtetlpages for creating fitting
memorials to the Jewish Communities that once lived in those shtetlach and
for providing a valuable resource for future generations of their descendants.

Dunilovichi (Dunilovitsh), Belarus
Created by Susan Weinberg
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Dunilovichi/Index.html
~~~~~

Husi (Khush), Romania
Created by Rennie Salz
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Gregory B. Meyer
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/husi/
~~~~~

Krivichi (Kshyviche, Krzywicze)
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Judith Goldsmith
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krivichi/index.html
~~~~~

Nowogrod, Poland
Created by Stanley Solomon
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Jonny Joseph
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Nowogrod/
~~~~~

Pasvalys (Posvel, Posvohl), Lithuania
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Anna Blanchard
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/pasvalys/
~~~~~

Radoshkovichi (Radoshkovits), Belarus
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Judith Goldsmith
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radoshkovichi/index.html
~~~~~

ShtetLinks webpages recently updated:

Ruzhany (Rozihnoy)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany/
~~~~~

If you wish to follow their example and create a ShtetLinks webpage for your
ancestral shtetl or adopt an exiting "orphaned" shtetlpage please contact us
at: < shtetl-help@jewishgen.org >
~~~~~

GOOD NEWS!! As a result for our appeal for HTML volunteers we now have a
team of dedicated people who will help you create a webpage for your ancestral
home. Please contact us if you would like help in creating a
ShtetLinks webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, ShtetLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
bloch@mts.net
Barbara Ellman, ShtetLinks Technical Coordinator


Czech forces in the British Army #austria-czech

Amos Israel Zezmer
 

Does anyone have the link to the Czech site which lists all the
Czech(oslovak) soldiers who were attached to the British forces during
World War II?

That most useful link---which regrettably disappeared >from my
computer---allowed me to look up a number of my relations.

Hope everyone had a happy New Year.

Best regards,

Amos ZEZMER
Yerres, France

Researching SPIEGEL, ROTH, KATZ, KALINA in the Prague-Marianske Lazne region


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech ShtetLinks Project Report for November 2009 #austria-czech

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen ShtetLinks.
We thank the owners and webmasters of these shtetlpages for creating fitting
memorials to the Jewish Communities that once lived in those shtetlach and
for providing a valuable resource for future generations of their descendants.

Dunilovichi (Dunilovitsh), Belarus
Created by Susan Weinberg
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Dunilovichi/Index.html
~~~~~

Husi (Khush), Romania
Created by Rennie Salz
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Gregory B. Meyer
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/husi/
~~~~~

Krivichi (Kshyviche, Krzywicze)
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Judith Goldsmith
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krivichi/index.html
~~~~~

Nowogrod, Poland
Created by Stanley Solomon
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Jonny Joseph
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Nowogrod/
~~~~~

Pasvalys (Posvel, Posvohl), Lithuania
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Anna Blanchard
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/pasvalys/
~~~~~

Radoshkovichi (Radoshkovits), Belarus
Created by Eilat Gordin Levitan
Webpage Design by ShtetLinks volunteer Judith Goldsmith
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radoshkovichi/index.html
~~~~~

ShtetLinks webpages recently updated:

Ruzhany (Rozihnoy)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany/
~~~~~

If you wish to follow their example and create a ShtetLinks webpage for your
ancestral shtetl or adopt an exiting "orphaned" shtetlpage please contact us
at: < shtetl-help@jewishgen.org >
~~~~~

GOOD NEWS!! As a result for our appeal for HTML volunteers we now have a
team of dedicated people who will help you create a webpage for your ancestral
home. Please contact us if you would like help in creating a
ShtetLinks webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, ShtetLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
bloch@mts.net
Barbara Ellman, ShtetLinks Technical Coordinator


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Czech forces in the British Army #austria-czech

Amos Israel Zezmer
 

Does anyone have the link to the Czech site which lists all the
Czech(oslovak) soldiers who were attached to the British forces during
World War II?

That most useful link---which regrettably disappeared >from my
computer---allowed me to look up a number of my relations.

Hope everyone had a happy New Year.

Best regards,

Amos ZEZMER
Yerres, France

Researching SPIEGEL, ROTH, KATZ, KALINA in the Prague-Marianske Lazne region


Re: Identifying JHB Cemetery #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul65@...>
 

There is no record on SA Jewish Rootweb in the Johannesburg, Brixton
or Braamfontein, online databases of her burial that year. It is known
that there are soem names that were omitted in the databases for
unknown reasons and I suggest you ask the Chevra Kadisha directly to
look it up.
"Chevra" <chevrahgroup@jhbchev.co.za>

Saul Issroff (London)


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: Identifying JHB Cemetery #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul65@...>
 

There is no record on SA Jewish Rootweb in the Johannesburg, Brixton
or Braamfontein, online databases of her burial that year. It is known
that there are soem names that were omitted in the databases for
unknown reasons and I suggest you ask the Chevra Kadisha directly to
look it up.
"Chevra" <chevrahgroup@jhbchev.co.za>

Saul Issroff (London)


Re: Identifying JHB Cemetery #southafrica

Valerie & Gilbert Herbert <herbert2@...>
 

Dear Donald,

A 1910 Johannesburg grave would be in the Braamfontein cemetery. My
grandfather, who died in 1911, is buried there.

Re4gards,

Gilbert Herbert

-----Original Message-----
Subject: Identifying JHB Cemetery
From: Guyleslie@aol.com
Date: Sat, 2 Jan 2010 15:49:16 EST

I'm hoping someone might help me find a gravestone in Johannesburg.
I have only the following information on my Great-grandmother:
"My mother Menucha Berman died July 17th 1910 age 45 years in Johannesburg.
No.of grave 239"
But it doesn't say which cemetery. I'm hoping someone with a better
knowledge of Johannesburg cemeteries might be able to identify which
cemetery >from the date (which cemetery primarily used then) & relationship
to grave #239.
Many thanks,
Donald Press, New York


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica RE: Identifying JHB Cemetery #southafrica

Valerie & Gilbert Herbert <herbert2@...>
 

Dear Donald,

A 1910 Johannesburg grave would be in the Braamfontein cemetery. My
grandfather, who died in 1911, is buried there.

Re4gards,

Gilbert Herbert

-----Original Message-----
Subject: Identifying JHB Cemetery
From: Guyleslie@aol.com
Date: Sat, 2 Jan 2010 15:49:16 EST

I'm hoping someone might help me find a gravestone in Johannesburg.
I have only the following information on my Great-grandmother:
"My mother Menucha Berman died July 17th 1910 age 45 years in Johannesburg.
No.of grave 239"
But it doesn't say which cemetery. I'm hoping someone with a better
knowledge of Johannesburg cemeteries might be able to identify which
cemetery >from the date (which cemetery primarily used then) & relationship
to grave #239.
Many thanks,
Donald Press, New York


translate VM 14273 #galicia

Milton Koch <miltonkoch@...>
 

This is a birth entry of Feibisch (entry 23). I am most
interested in the information in the other columns - names,
identification, and other data.

Thank you.

Milton Koch
KOCH - Jagelnica/Potok Zloty
BARBASCH - Podvolchisk

MODERATOR NOTE: To see this ViewMate image, please go to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14273>.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia translate VM 14273 #galicia

Milton Koch <miltonkoch@...>
 

This is a birth entry of Feibisch (entry 23). I am most
interested in the information in the other columns - names,
identification, and other data.

Thank you.

Milton Koch
KOCH - Jagelnica/Potok Zloty
BARBASCH - Podvolchisk

MODERATOR NOTE: To see this ViewMate image, please go to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14273>.


translation help, please, from German to English #general

Debbie Long <d_long@...>
 

Dear Colleagues:

I need help translating a one-page form in German. It can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14271

The form was filled in by my mother describing her work experience in
the Lodz Ghetto in order to claim compensation, I believe.

Debbie Long
Searching for GALAS of Lodz, Jezow, Ujadz, Poland;
for DOBRZYNSKI of Zgierz, Lodz;
WEISS and MUNK of Budapest
d_long@mindspring.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen translation help, please, from German to English #general

Debbie Long <d_long@...>
 

Dear Colleagues:

I need help translating a one-page form in German. It can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14271

The form was filled in by my mother describing her work experience in
the Lodz Ghetto in order to claim compensation, I believe.

Debbie Long
Searching for GALAS of Lodz, Jezow, Ujadz, Poland;
for DOBRZYNSKI of Zgierz, Lodz;
WEISS and MUNK of Budapest
d_long@mindspring.com


Viewmate 14277 gravestone translation request #general

Elynn Boss
 

I have a gravestone posted on view mate, 14277.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14277

I am looking for a translation of the Hebrew on the stone to English.

Thanks.

Elynn Boss


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate 14277 gravestone translation request #general

Elynn Boss
 

I have a gravestone posted on view mate, 14277.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14277

I am looking for a translation of the Hebrew on the stone to English.

Thanks.

Elynn Boss


Vysnetshka in Volhynia #general

Ittai Hershman
 

Trying to identify the shtetl named in the Hebrew text shown at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14272 which
transliterated is: "Vysnetshka" in the province of Volhynia.

JewishGen Communities Database and Google searches have not netted anything
for me; and nor did a Google.co.il search on the Hebrew name as written in
the book (nor Yad Va'Shem, nor EIDB).

The man in question, Avraham Hornstein, moved >from Radomyshl on getting
married and owned a sugar factory in this shtetl, according to the book,
before eventually moving to Kiev (and ultimately Vienna where he died and
was buried in 1919).

Incidentally, his 3rd marriage (at age 51) is captured in the JRI-Poland
index for Przemysl in 1897 with an indication he was born in Aleksandria and
lived in Kiev. So this shtetl name may date back to circa 1860.

I am planning to look for his Vienna Meldezettel which may provide further
input, but perhaps some of you recognize this shtetl name >from your
research?

Many thanks,
Ittai Hershman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vysnetshka in Volhynia #general

Ittai Hershman
 

Trying to identify the shtetl named in the Hebrew text shown at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=14272 which
transliterated is: "Vysnetshka" in the province of Volhynia.

JewishGen Communities Database and Google searches have not netted anything
for me; and nor did a Google.co.il search on the Hebrew name as written in
the book (nor Yad Va'Shem, nor EIDB).

The man in question, Avraham Hornstein, moved >from Radomyshl on getting
married and owned a sugar factory in this shtetl, according to the book,
before eventually moving to Kiev (and ultimately Vienna where he died and
was buried in 1919).

Incidentally, his 3rd marriage (at age 51) is captured in the JRI-Poland
index for Przemysl in 1897 with an indication he was born in Aleksandria and
lived in Kiev. So this shtetl name may date back to circa 1860.

I am planning to look for his Vienna Meldezettel which may provide further
input, but perhaps some of you recognize this shtetl name >from your
research?

Many thanks,
Ittai Hershman


Re: Word meanings -- yatko, Kasraktinim #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Stewart K. Bernstein wrote

I am interested in the meaning of the word "yatko". I have been told
that it is associated with "butcher".
Yes, indeed.

Jatka, pron [yah tkah] is an archaic Polish term for the butcher shop.
Most probably originated >from the East (Tatars or Mongols) since "jatka"
also means a bloody fight .

In addition, have come across the word "Kasraktinim" (sp.?). This
may have a meaning associated with brick manufacturing.
It would be nice to see a scanned copy of the originally written word.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Word meanings -- yatko, Kasraktinim #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Stewart K. Bernstein wrote

I am interested in the meaning of the word "yatko". I have been told
that it is associated with "butcher".
Yes, indeed.

Jatka, pron [yah tkah] is an archaic Polish term for the butcher shop.
Most probably originated >from the East (Tatars or Mongols) since "jatka"
also means a bloody fight .

In addition, have come across the word "Kasraktinim" (sp.?). This
may have a meaning associated with brick manufacturing.
It would be nice to see a scanned copy of the originally written word.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Enticing relatives into family history: summary of answers received #general

Alberto Guido Chester
 

Dear Genners
I have received a dozen plus of answers on my post : How to entice
relatives into family history. Needless to say, that is more answers
than >from my own family. (grin here).
If I were a shrink, I'd made some good money on the disappointment
most of us feel at poor feedback, ignoring and even aggression from
some relatives.
But, as someone pointed out, a couple of thank you, making cousins to
meet for the first time or helping a child get an A with his
genealogy school project outweigh the latter.
I will try to summarize the suggestions received, plus a couple of my
own. I am unable to organize them like if it were a handbook, because
of their heterogeneity, at least at this time.

Communication:
Send away a basic tree to relatives. Include younger people even
without correct names. Even if you don't have birth dates, infer them
and write them on the tree.. Make sure that everyone (especially
ladies) appear a couple of years *older* than they are. It's easy if you
calculate a generation being 20 years instead of 25. This will make
them eager to correct that.

Family Tree Builder (and probably other software) can produce
descendant reports and charts in pdf form which can be read by anyone,
even if they don't have a genealogy software. Assume recipients are
not going to download a program to see what you sent them, even if its
free. And moreover, they are not going to print 30 pages and glue them
like a puzzle. Either you do the puzzle work and send it by snail
mail, or email a small chart. Make sure it's possible to read even if
you are not an expert. Include photographs in the chart form. Old
pictures with people in old clothes and new pictures with face
portraits are recommended.

Phone sometime later to check if they have received it and have some
corrections or additions.

Use Skype for low cost calls abroad.

Speaking the local language is a big plus. If you cannot speak the
local language, ask someone to do it on your behalf. Language
differences are a barrier and should be taken into account.

Practice the art of cold calls. Have your notes ready to entice the
recipient in a conversation. Mentioning a surname >from two generations
before, which is not in the phonebook, might open a magical door. Make
them sure you are not doing this for their money. Try to make them
feel comfident about this strange call before gunning questions at the
recipient. (This person was cooking and you ask for the exact date
Great Aunt Chaya was born!) People are much more prone to answering
questions on the phone than writing a letter. But that is after they
believe they are talking to someone who is really a cousin.

If this person is not cooperative, ask whom in the family (even if a
more distant relative) could be interested.

Publishing
Upload trees to sites like My Heritage and produce a periodic update.
People become interested when they see the site is moving forward.
Be constant and patient with regular contact and updates that these
sites provide.

If you plan to publish a book, send proofs to relatives asking for
corrections or additions, including a deadline.

Young people
Collect young people's emails and open a Facebook account. Many
youngsters use Facebook as their only source of info.
Remember uncooperative cousins may be parents of cooperative young people.
Most youngsters, by nature, will not be interested with this news.
Just expect for one interested and you can say victory.
Schools have genealogy projects: make sure people know you'll provide
the necessary info when their children need it.

Social networks as Facebook
Another suggestion about Facebook is the opening of an account for the
family history, adding photographs of deceased relatives and limiting
access only to a list of persons. Then you make friends (which is the
Facebook term for sharing) saying Then "If you are the son of
so-and-so and the grandson of so-and-so, then we are cousins. Come
see the family album of ancestors on my Facebook site." People will
respond "How did you find me?"
Dialogue is opened in a non-threatening way.

Pick up foreign genealogy buddies
Contact a person abroad who is willing to help you researching your
family in exchange of you researching his at your location.
You will find family info, new adopted cousins and someone to share
your interest via email.
If you don't find the apropiate buddy, hire a professional researcher.
Even if you have to hire a professional researcher elsewhere to fill a
gap your actual relatives are not filling, it will be less expensive
than the eternal wait for help that will never come.

Family problems in the past
Be prepared to expect hidden relatives or bad branches that no one
wants to talk about, or they will not want to talk to you.
Do not take sides on these problems of the past, just try a
professional objective approach. An article clearing the air in the
family bulletin (or website) you are periodically sending out, can
help bring parts together. Remember always our ancestors lived through
different and difficult circumstances, which we cannot even grasp.

Big projects
Organizing a family reunion or raising funds to hire a researcher in
the Old country are another step. These high rise projects can take
place only in a second stage. They have the added bonus of being an
extraordinary push towards the integration of the team or nucleus of
founders who are already interested in the family issue. Once you
have this founder team, bigger issues can be attempted.

I hope everyone gets a couple of ideas that will advance their research.

Thanks go to
Annie in Minnesota, Shaul Sharoni, Linda Shefler, Naidia Woolf, Irene
Newhouse, Morris Blaher, Ann Linder, Joe Fibel, Micah, Anna Reuter,
Cindy Glass, Dr. Larry Gaum, Nicole Heymans, Ted Semegran, Judi
Zimmer, Helene Kenvin and others.

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Enticing relatives into family history: summary of answers received #general

Alberto Guido Chester
 

Dear Genners
I have received a dozen plus of answers on my post : How to entice
relatives into family history. Needless to say, that is more answers
than >from my own family. (grin here).
If I were a shrink, I'd made some good money on the disappointment
most of us feel at poor feedback, ignoring and even aggression from
some relatives.
But, as someone pointed out, a couple of thank you, making cousins to
meet for the first time or helping a child get an A with his
genealogy school project outweigh the latter.
I will try to summarize the suggestions received, plus a couple of my
own. I am unable to organize them like if it were a handbook, because
of their heterogeneity, at least at this time.

Communication:
Send away a basic tree to relatives. Include younger people even
without correct names. Even if you don't have birth dates, infer them
and write them on the tree.. Make sure that everyone (especially
ladies) appear a couple of years *older* than they are. It's easy if you
calculate a generation being 20 years instead of 25. This will make
them eager to correct that.

Family Tree Builder (and probably other software) can produce
descendant reports and charts in pdf form which can be read by anyone,
even if they don't have a genealogy software. Assume recipients are
not going to download a program to see what you sent them, even if its
free. And moreover, they are not going to print 30 pages and glue them
like a puzzle. Either you do the puzzle work and send it by snail
mail, or email a small chart. Make sure it's possible to read even if
you are not an expert. Include photographs in the chart form. Old
pictures with people in old clothes and new pictures with face
portraits are recommended.

Phone sometime later to check if they have received it and have some
corrections or additions.

Use Skype for low cost calls abroad.

Speaking the local language is a big plus. If you cannot speak the
local language, ask someone to do it on your behalf. Language
differences are a barrier and should be taken into account.

Practice the art of cold calls. Have your notes ready to entice the
recipient in a conversation. Mentioning a surname >from two generations
before, which is not in the phonebook, might open a magical door. Make
them sure you are not doing this for their money. Try to make them
feel comfident about this strange call before gunning questions at the
recipient. (This person was cooking and you ask for the exact date
Great Aunt Chaya was born!) People are much more prone to answering
questions on the phone than writing a letter. But that is after they
believe they are talking to someone who is really a cousin.

If this person is not cooperative, ask whom in the family (even if a
more distant relative) could be interested.

Publishing
Upload trees to sites like My Heritage and produce a periodic update.
People become interested when they see the site is moving forward.
Be constant and patient with regular contact and updates that these
sites provide.

If you plan to publish a book, send proofs to relatives asking for
corrections or additions, including a deadline.

Young people
Collect young people's emails and open a Facebook account. Many
youngsters use Facebook as their only source of info.
Remember uncooperative cousins may be parents of cooperative young people.
Most youngsters, by nature, will not be interested with this news.
Just expect for one interested and you can say victory.
Schools have genealogy projects: make sure people know you'll provide
the necessary info when their children need it.

Social networks as Facebook
Another suggestion about Facebook is the opening of an account for the
family history, adding photographs of deceased relatives and limiting
access only to a list of persons. Then you make friends (which is the
Facebook term for sharing) saying Then "If you are the son of
so-and-so and the grandson of so-and-so, then we are cousins. Come
see the family album of ancestors on my Facebook site." People will
respond "How did you find me?"
Dialogue is opened in a non-threatening way.

Pick up foreign genealogy buddies
Contact a person abroad who is willing to help you researching your
family in exchange of you researching his at your location.
You will find family info, new adopted cousins and someone to share
your interest via email.
If you don't find the apropiate buddy, hire a professional researcher.
Even if you have to hire a professional researcher elsewhere to fill a
gap your actual relatives are not filling, it will be less expensive
than the eternal wait for help that will never come.

Family problems in the past
Be prepared to expect hidden relatives or bad branches that no one
wants to talk about, or they will not want to talk to you.
Do not take sides on these problems of the past, just try a
professional objective approach. An article clearing the air in the
family bulletin (or website) you are periodically sending out, can
help bring parts together. Remember always our ancestors lived through
different and difficult circumstances, which we cannot even grasp.

Big projects
Organizing a family reunion or raising funds to hire a researcher in
the Old country are another step. These high rise projects can take
place only in a second stage. They have the added bonus of being an
extraordinary push towards the integration of the team or nucleus of
founders who are already interested in the family issue. Once you
have this founder team, bigger issues can be attempted.

I hope everyone gets a couple of ideas that will advance their research.

Thanks go to
Annie in Minnesota, Shaul Sharoni, Linda Shefler, Naidia Woolf, Irene
Newhouse, Morris Blaher, Ann Linder, Joe Fibel, Micah, Anna Reuter,
Cindy Glass, Dr. Larry Gaum, Nicole Heymans, Ted Semegran, Judi
Zimmer, Helene Kenvin and others.

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina