Date   

Answers to Question on the Polish Military #galicia

Josef A. Herz <josef@...>
 

Back in January, 2001 I posted a series of questions about the Polish
military pre-WW II.

Several people contacted me expressing interest in the answers - if I
got them. I finally do have the answers - so here it is.

First I want to thank the families of Jewish veterans and Polish
veterans groups that were kind enough to provide me with some of the
answers.


I received the most complete and detailed answers >from Central
Library of the Polish Army - a lead >from my local library.

Here were my questions -

For the Polish Army pre World War II:
-What was the military obligation for Polish citizens?
-At what age were people called up? 18? 20?
-What was the total length required for active serve?
-What was the reserve obligation after active service? how long? how
much time per year?
-Was reserve service usually assigned to local geographic units? i.e.
my Father lived in Lvov - would he be assigned to a local unit that
was based in Lvov or in its immediate area?

Here are the answers -
Ad.1 - Every young, healthy man was obliged to common military service

Ad.2 People were called at 21 (Registration at 18 )

Ad.3 the total length required for active service - two years

Ad.4 The reserve obligation :
After active service (6 to 8 weeks per year )
-for soldiers and non commission officers to age 40
-for officers to age 50
Ad.5 Assigning to geographical units was changing in time before the
Second World War .The reserve service not always assigned to local
geographical units.

In addition, here is a list of Polish military units in the vicinity
of Lwow prior to WW II (I received this >from a Polish veteran group):

In Tarnopol at the time were: 54th Kresowy Infantry Regiment, 12th
Kresowy Light
Artillery Regiment (they also had a small unit stationed in Lwow)

In Lwow at the time were: 19th Infantry Regiment, 3rd battallion of the 26th
Infantry Regiment 40th Infantry Regiment 'Dzieci Lwow', 14th Cavalry
Regiment, 5th 'Lwowski' Light Artillery Regiment, 6th Heavy Artillery
Regiment, a unit of the 11th Carpathian Light Artillery Regiment, a
unit of the 1st Mountain Artillery Regiment, and (finally) a unit of
the 1st Motorized
Artillery Regiment.

Again - thank you to those thatassisted me in getting these answers.
I hope that this information might assist others.


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Josef Herz - Renton, WA

Doing research on: HERZ, SIGAL/SEGAL, SCHAMER, LEIBER
in Lvov/Lwow/Lemberg, Kristinopol/Chervonograd, Stoyanov/Stiyanev, Sokal


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Answers to Question on the Polish Military #galicia

Josef A. Herz <josef@...>
 

Back in January, 2001 I posted a series of questions about the Polish
military pre-WW II.

Several people contacted me expressing interest in the answers - if I
got them. I finally do have the answers - so here it is.

First I want to thank the families of Jewish veterans and Polish
veterans groups that were kind enough to provide me with some of the
answers.


I received the most complete and detailed answers >from Central
Library of the Polish Army - a lead >from my local library.

Here were my questions -

For the Polish Army pre World War II:
-What was the military obligation for Polish citizens?
-At what age were people called up? 18? 20?
-What was the total length required for active serve?
-What was the reserve obligation after active service? how long? how
much time per year?
-Was reserve service usually assigned to local geographic units? i.e.
my Father lived in Lvov - would he be assigned to a local unit that
was based in Lvov or in its immediate area?

Here are the answers -
Ad.1 - Every young, healthy man was obliged to common military service

Ad.2 People were called at 21 (Registration at 18 )

Ad.3 the total length required for active service - two years

Ad.4 The reserve obligation :
After active service (6 to 8 weeks per year )
-for soldiers and non commission officers to age 40
-for officers to age 50
Ad.5 Assigning to geographical units was changing in time before the
Second World War .The reserve service not always assigned to local
geographical units.

In addition, here is a list of Polish military units in the vicinity
of Lwow prior to WW II (I received this >from a Polish veteran group):

In Tarnopol at the time were: 54th Kresowy Infantry Regiment, 12th
Kresowy Light
Artillery Regiment (they also had a small unit stationed in Lwow)

In Lwow at the time were: 19th Infantry Regiment, 3rd battallion of the 26th
Infantry Regiment 40th Infantry Regiment 'Dzieci Lwow', 14th Cavalry
Regiment, 5th 'Lwowski' Light Artillery Regiment, 6th Heavy Artillery
Regiment, a unit of the 11th Carpathian Light Artillery Regiment, a
unit of the 1st Mountain Artillery Regiment, and (finally) a unit of
the 1st Motorized
Artillery Regiment.

Again - thank you to those thatassisted me in getting these answers.
I hope that this information might assist others.


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Josef Herz - Renton, WA

Doing research on: HERZ, SIGAL/SEGAL, SCHAMER, LEIBER
in Lvov/Lwow/Lemberg, Kristinopol/Chervonograd, Stoyanov/Stiyanev, Sokal


Kremenets Yizkor Book, First Installment is on-line #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

I am pleased to announce that our first translation of the Kremenets Yizkor
Book, Pinkas Kremenets edited by Abraham Samuel Stein now is publicly
available on the Yizkor Book website

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets/kremenets.html

The book originally was published in Tel Aviv in 1954 by former residents of
Kremenets in Israel. It contains an extensive Hebrew section followed by a
Yiddish section, and is 453 pages long. This is the first installment of our
English translation. More is coming soon.

Our volunteer translators have done a remarkable job in translating the
first set of chapters. I particularly want to thank David Dubin, Rob
Goldstein and Steve Wien for all the effort they have put into this work.

The on-line book includes a detailed Table of Contents that is hyperlinked
to the text sections that have been translated. It also includes photos
(mostly of people) scanned >from the text. A Table of Figures has links to
each of the 20 photos currently in the translated text. In addition, to help
you find names of the people listed, we have added a Name Index at the end
of the book. It has about 300 names, and the pages on which the names
appear. The Name Index will grow as we translate additional sections.

Be sure to read the Translation Project Editor's Note, which explains how we
transliterated names. This will help you in locating particular names in the
book. If you have reason to believe that a transliterated name should be
spelled differently, please let me know. And, If you locate ancestors on the
list, please let me know about that too. I'm keeping a log of "successes",
which eventually we'll post on our website. As usual, if you have any
questions, be sure to contact me. I'm looking forward to hearing >from you.

Our volunteer translators are dedicated to our task, and have done
remarkably good work ... and, they are continuing to work. However, it is
clear that we will have to hire professional translators if we are to
complete this and the other Kremenets Yizkor Books (totalling about 1,000
pages in all) within a reasonable time. That means we must raise enough
money to pay the considerable expense for professional translators.
Consequently, I urge you to make a cash contribution to the Kremenets Yizkor
Book Translation Project.

To make a donation, point your browser to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html.

To be sure your donation goes to our Kremenets project, scroll down the list
and check the box next to Kremenets, Ukraine. You can make your donation
electronically (and safely) with a credit card, or you can download a
printable form for making your payment by mail. Donations are
tax-deductible.

Those who donate time and/or money to the project receive pre-release copies
of all translations and lists that we produce. This is one of the ways we
can reward those who help the project move forward. So, please make your
donation now ... and let me know about it. I will then add you to our e-mail
list of contributors so that you can receive pre-release copies of the next
Yizkor Book and Vital Records translations.

One last thing. If you haven't visited the Kremenets ShtetLinks website
recently, do visit now:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/

Sheree Roth and her son Max have done (and are doing) a wonderful job of
building this site as a home for all things Kremenets. You'll find
historical information about Kremenets, analysis of the vital records, and
photos of Kremenets and Kremenetsers. If you have material to contribute to
the website, please contact either Sheree (sroth@pacbell.net) or me
(rondoctor@qwest.net).

I hope you get as much personal satisfaction >from this English translation
and our other Kremenets work as I do. For me, this effort has been one of
the most personally satisfying things I have ever done ... and there is more
to come as our translators continue their work.

Ron Doctor
Translation Editor, Kremenets Yizkor Book Project


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Kremenets Yizkor Book, First Installment is on-line #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

I am pleased to announce that our first translation of the Kremenets Yizkor
Book, Pinkas Kremenets edited by Abraham Samuel Stein now is publicly
available on the Yizkor Book website

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets/kremenets.html

The book originally was published in Tel Aviv in 1954 by former residents of
Kremenets in Israel. It contains an extensive Hebrew section followed by a
Yiddish section, and is 453 pages long. This is the first installment of our
English translation. More is coming soon.

Our volunteer translators have done a remarkable job in translating the
first set of chapters. I particularly want to thank David Dubin, Rob
Goldstein and Steve Wien for all the effort they have put into this work.

The on-line book includes a detailed Table of Contents that is hyperlinked
to the text sections that have been translated. It also includes photos
(mostly of people) scanned >from the text. A Table of Figures has links to
each of the 20 photos currently in the translated text. In addition, to help
you find names of the people listed, we have added a Name Index at the end
of the book. It has about 300 names, and the pages on which the names
appear. The Name Index will grow as we translate additional sections.

Be sure to read the Translation Project Editor's Note, which explains how we
transliterated names. This will help you in locating particular names in the
book. If you have reason to believe that a transliterated name should be
spelled differently, please let me know. And, If you locate ancestors on the
list, please let me know about that too. I'm keeping a log of "successes",
which eventually we'll post on our website. As usual, if you have any
questions, be sure to contact me. I'm looking forward to hearing >from you.

Our volunteer translators are dedicated to our task, and have done
remarkably good work ... and, they are continuing to work. However, it is
clear that we will have to hire professional translators if we are to
complete this and the other Kremenets Yizkor Books (totalling about 1,000
pages in all) within a reasonable time. That means we must raise enough
money to pay the considerable expense for professional translators.
Consequently, I urge you to make a cash contribution to the Kremenets Yizkor
Book Translation Project.

To make a donation, point your browser to:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html.

To be sure your donation goes to our Kremenets project, scroll down the list
and check the box next to Kremenets, Ukraine. You can make your donation
electronically (and safely) with a credit card, or you can download a
printable form for making your payment by mail. Donations are
tax-deductible.

Those who donate time and/or money to the project receive pre-release copies
of all translations and lists that we produce. This is one of the ways we
can reward those who help the project move forward. So, please make your
donation now ... and let me know about it. I will then add you to our e-mail
list of contributors so that you can receive pre-release copies of the next
Yizkor Book and Vital Records translations.

One last thing. If you haven't visited the Kremenets ShtetLinks website
recently, do visit now:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/

Sheree Roth and her son Max have done (and are doing) a wonderful job of
building this site as a home for all things Kremenets. You'll find
historical information about Kremenets, analysis of the vital records, and
photos of Kremenets and Kremenetsers. If you have material to contribute to
the website, please contact either Sheree (sroth@pacbell.net) or me
(rondoctor@qwest.net).

I hope you get as much personal satisfaction >from this English translation
and our other Kremenets work as I do. For me, this effort has been one of
the most personally satisfying things I have ever done ... and there is more
to come as our translators continue their work.

Ron Doctor
Translation Editor, Kremenets Yizkor Book Project


Town of "Sakot" #poland

Danny Fantl <dannyfantl@...>
 

I am posting this message for a friend in Melboure, Australia. Her father
(surname Meyerovitz) told her that his parents were born in the town of
"Sakot". He doesn't know how it was spelt, and in fact doesn't know if it
was in Poland or Lithuania (or elsewhere?). He just knows his parents
verbally said they came >from Sakot (literally spoken "Sukot", with the "u"
pronounced as in the "u" of "umbrella".

My friend thinks Lithuania, as her grandparents travelled and settled in
South Africa, and then her father eventually came to Australia.

Has anyone any clues regarding the town and where it may be? I have
searched the ShtetlSeeker, and the closest I get is Saukoto in Lithuania.

Thanks,
Danny Fantl
Melbourne, Australia

Researching: FANTL, FANTLOVA, KRAUS, KRAUSOVA, BLOCH, BLOCHOVA, LOWIT,
LOWITOVA, BULL, BULOVA, KOHN, WITZ, PORGES, PORGESOVA, FRISCHMANN,
FRISCHMANNOVA


JRI Poland #Poland Town of "Sakot" #poland

Danny Fantl <dannyfantl@...>
 

I am posting this message for a friend in Melboure, Australia. Her father
(surname Meyerovitz) told her that his parents were born in the town of
"Sakot". He doesn't know how it was spelt, and in fact doesn't know if it
was in Poland or Lithuania (or elsewhere?). He just knows his parents
verbally said they came >from Sakot (literally spoken "Sukot", with the "u"
pronounced as in the "u" of "umbrella".

My friend thinks Lithuania, as her grandparents travelled and settled in
South Africa, and then her father eventually came to Australia.

Has anyone any clues regarding the town and where it may be? I have
searched the ShtetlSeeker, and the closest I get is Saukoto in Lithuania.

Thanks,
Danny Fantl
Melbourne, Australia

Researching: FANTL, FANTLOVA, KRAUS, KRAUSOVA, BLOCH, BLOCHOVA, LOWIT,
LOWITOVA, BULL, BULOVA, KOHN, WITZ, PORGES, PORGESOVA, FRISCHMANN,
FRISCHMANNOVA


BRISKER/BARNETT #general

zerakodesh@...
 

Hello
I found the BRISKER name on the Jewish poor Jews shelter in London. I
wonder if any one knows of this person. It is the name of one of my uncles
who changed his name to BARNETT in London, England.
He was listed as a baker. He seems to have come into the country twice
in the early l900s. He was my father's half brother.
Thanks for any help you can give.
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
ZeraKodesh@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BRISKER/BARNETT #general

zerakodesh@...
 

Hello
I found the BRISKER name on the Jewish poor Jews shelter in London. I
wonder if any one knows of this person. It is the name of one of my uncles
who changed his name to BARNETT in London, England.
He was listed as a baker. He seems to have come into the country twice
in the early l900s. He was my father's half brother.
Thanks for any help you can give.
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
ZeraKodesh@aol.com


Re: Grodno, Odessa #general

Jerry (Gerald B.) Bernstein <jbernste@...>
 

Grodno is in Today's Belarus, west of Minsk. Odessa is several hundred
miles to the south on the shore of the Black Sea.

BABYCAT3 wrote:

Can someonetell me if thesetwo vicinities were ever one and the same orat
least near one another in the mid to late 1800's? I had no luck searching
the maps programs on the genealogy site. Still have alot to learn!!
Thanks
Barbara Meyers

MODERATOR NOTE: Barbara Meyers is referring to Grodno and Odessa.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Grodno, Odessa #general

Jerry (Gerald B.) Bernstein <jbernste@...>
 

Grodno is in Today's Belarus, west of Minsk. Odessa is several hundred
miles to the south on the shore of the Black Sea.

BABYCAT3 wrote:

Can someonetell me if thesetwo vicinities were ever one and the same orat
least near one another in the mid to late 1800's? I had no luck searching
the maps programs on the genealogy site. Still have alot to learn!!
Thanks
Barbara Meyers

MODERATOR NOTE: Barbara Meyers is referring to Grodno and Odessa.


Morris Zeitung - b. 1842 #warsaw #poland

Emma Lefevre <Emma@...>
 

I am researching my great great grandfather - Morris Zeitung who came to =
England c. 1860 - His father's name was Gabriel Zeitung on his wedding =
certificate and on his naturalisation certificate he was born on January =
18 1842 in Warsaw. =20
I have found some matches to Zeitung - Zeiting - Zaytun - Cajtung- =
Cajtyng and my cousin tells me that the would all be pronounced =
similarly. Could anyone tell me what Morris is in Yiddish ? How can I =
find more information ? I am quite hopeful about this match because my =
genealogy group thought this name was not Jewish.
Thanks


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Morris Zeitung - b. 1842 #warsaw #poland

Emma Lefevre <Emma@...>
 

I am researching my great great grandfather - Morris Zeitung who came to =
England c. 1860 - His father's name was Gabriel Zeitung on his wedding =
certificate and on his naturalisation certificate he was born on January =
18 1842 in Warsaw. =20
I have found some matches to Zeitung - Zeiting - Zaytun - Cajtung- =
Cajtyng and my cousin tells me that the would all be pronounced =
similarly. Could anyone tell me what Morris is in Yiddish ? How can I =
find more information ? I am quite hopeful about this match because my =
genealogy group thought this name was not Jewish.
Thanks


on the name Chadna #general

Marty Meyers <marty@...>
 

Hi,

I've just learned that my great-grandmother Chana Laia Bordowicz (nee
Zylberman) had a sibling Chadna Zylberman who eventually left Przasnysz and
settled in the Detroit area.

I'm assuming that Chadna is a female name?
Does anyone know the derivation of Chadna? Is is related to Chana?
Any idea what the american name might have become, say Hanna?


Thanks,

Marty

direct email replies should go to <meyers01@home.com>

researching:
BORDOWICZ/BORDOWITZ/BARDOWITZ/BRODOWICZ >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston
MEYEROWITZ/MEYERS >from Russia to New York/Worcester,
KIRSHNER/SIDMAN >from Austria to Leeds to Massachsetts,
LANDSMAN >from Russia to Massachusetts
ZELMANOVICH >from Poland (Przasnysz/Prushnitz area?)
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston, Detroit, Chicago

Marty Meyers
<meyers01@home.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen on the name Chadna #general

Marty Meyers <marty@...>
 

Hi,

I've just learned that my great-grandmother Chana Laia Bordowicz (nee
Zylberman) had a sibling Chadna Zylberman who eventually left Przasnysz and
settled in the Detroit area.

I'm assuming that Chadna is a female name?
Does anyone know the derivation of Chadna? Is is related to Chana?
Any idea what the american name might have become, say Hanna?


Thanks,

Marty

direct email replies should go to <meyers01@home.com>

researching:
BORDOWICZ/BORDOWITZ/BARDOWITZ/BRODOWICZ >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston
MEYEROWITZ/MEYERS >from Russia to New York/Worcester,
KIRSHNER/SIDMAN >from Austria to Leeds to Massachsetts,
LANDSMAN >from Russia to Massachusetts
ZELMANOVICH >from Poland (Przasnysz/Prushnitz area?)
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston, Detroit, Chicago

Marty Meyers
<meyers01@home.com>


separate sigs #ukraine

ADAVIS <ADAVIS@...>
 

Allan-


On the topic of creating individual sigs for regions or shtetlach:

In doing so, we miss the benefit of shared learnings of the whole in a
region where Jews were always on the move. Create a Special Research
Group, sure, but how many people would benefit >from that group having its own discussion group versus the number that would benefit >from their
continued participation in the U SIG.

If you have a group of researchers interested, start a research group.

Create a Shtetlink, translate documents, contribute to databases, but
stay under the ageis of the U SIG, for everyone's sake.


Adam Davis

Chicago


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine separate sigs #ukraine

ADAVIS <ADAVIS@...>
 

Allan-


On the topic of creating individual sigs for regions or shtetlach:

In doing so, we miss the benefit of shared learnings of the whole in a
region where Jews were always on the move. Create a Special Research
Group, sure, but how many people would benefit >from that group having its own discussion group versus the number that would benefit >from their
continued participation in the U SIG.

If you have a group of researchers interested, start a research group.

Create a Shtetlink, translate documents, contribute to databases, but
stay under the ageis of the U SIG, for everyone's sake.


Adam Davis

Chicago


Town of "Sakot" #general

Danny Fantl <dannyfantl@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners,

I am posting this message for a friend in Melboure, Australia. Her father
(surname Meyerovitz) told her that his parents were born in the town of
"Sakot". He doesn't know how it was spelt, and in fact doesn't know if it
was in Poland or Lithuania (or elsewhere?). He just knows his parents
verbally said they came >from Sakot (literally spoken "Sukot", with the "u"
pronounced as in the "u" of "umbrella".

My friend thinks Lithuania, as her grandparents travelled and settled in
South Africa, and then her father eventually came to Australia.

Has anyone any clues regarding the town and where it may be? I have
searched the ShtetlSeeker, and the closest I get is Saukoto in Lithuania.

Thanks,
Danny Fantl
Melbourne, Australia

Researching: FANTL, FANTLOVA, KRAUS, KRAUSOVA, BLOCH, BLOCHOVA, LOWIT,
LOWITOVA, BULL, BULOVA, KOHN, WITZ, PORGES, PORGESOVA, FRISCHMANN,
FRISCHMANNOVA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Town of "Sakot" #general

Danny Fantl <dannyfantl@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners,

I am posting this message for a friend in Melboure, Australia. Her father
(surname Meyerovitz) told her that his parents were born in the town of
"Sakot". He doesn't know how it was spelt, and in fact doesn't know if it
was in Poland or Lithuania (or elsewhere?). He just knows his parents
verbally said they came >from Sakot (literally spoken "Sukot", with the "u"
pronounced as in the "u" of "umbrella".

My friend thinks Lithuania, as her grandparents travelled and settled in
South Africa, and then her father eventually came to Australia.

Has anyone any clues regarding the town and where it may be? I have
searched the ShtetlSeeker, and the closest I get is Saukoto in Lithuania.

Thanks,
Danny Fantl
Melbourne, Australia

Researching: FANTL, FANTLOVA, KRAUS, KRAUSOVA, BLOCH, BLOCHOVA, LOWIT,
LOWITOVA, BULL, BULOVA, KOHN, WITZ, PORGES, PORGESOVA, FRISCHMANN,
FRISCHMANNOVA


Re: Millie MOSES #general

Kevin Bean <KevinxxxBean@...>
 

Was Milly born in Manchester?, I am reseaching the MOSES >from London at
about the time of her birth.

Researching:

JOSEPH London
MOSES London
MOSS London
SCOTT London
SOLOMON London

Family History Tree at www.KevinBean.co.uk


"Michael London" <mycroft@icon.co.za> wrote in message

Can anyone supply me with information about the late Milly MOSES
(1866 -1934)?

She was my maternal grandmother and died in Manchester in 1934.

She married Mark ZEIDERMAN and they had 10 children.

Michael London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Millie MOSES #general

Kevin Bean <KevinxxxBean@...>
 

Was Milly born in Manchester?, I am reseaching the MOSES >from London at
about the time of her birth.

Researching:

JOSEPH London
MOSES London
MOSS London
SCOTT London
SOLOMON London

Family History Tree at www.KevinBean.co.uk


"Michael London" <mycroft@icon.co.za> wrote in message

Can anyone supply me with information about the late Milly MOSES
(1866 -1934)?

She was my maternal grandmother and died in Manchester in 1934.

She married Mark ZEIDERMAN and they had 10 children.

Michael London