Date   

Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Images from Kremenets Vital Records #yizkorbooks

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/and
scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP
MODERATOR NOTE: The Moderator was not allowed access to the first URL
given; however the individual URLs worked.


Images from Kremenets Vital Records #yizkorbooks

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/and
scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP
MODERATOR NOTE: The Moderator was not allowed access to the first URL
given; however the individual URLs worked.


Images from Kremenets Vital Records #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
Translation_guides.htm
and scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP

MODERATOR NOTE: Please make sure to copy and paste the entire URL.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Images from Kremenets Vital Records #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
Translation_guides.htm
and scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/
guides/Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP

MODERATOR NOTE: Please make sure to copy and paste the entire URL.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question SCHWARTZ #general

rob mcgowan <robzstuff@...>
 

Robert mcgowan
The family surname is :Schwartz
The came >from prussia or east prussia in the mid 1800's
I don't know what city,
I want to know if this is a Jewish name and if so where the name comes from
You see I am doing a family tree and if my great great grandmother was
Jewish I would like to know that.

Thanx


Question SCHWARTZ #general

rob mcgowan <robzstuff@...>
 

Robert mcgowan
The family surname is :Schwartz
The came >from prussia or east prussia in the mid 1800's
I don't know what city,
I want to know if this is a Jewish name and if so where the name comes from
You see I am doing a family tree and if my great great grandmother was
Jewish I would like to know that.

Thanx


Czevnitz? Czech Republic #general

Judith BERLOWITZ <jberlowitz@...>
 

Dear Judith
The URL you quote below does not lead to the page
you require. The URL you need to give is the general
one, for the ShtetlSeeker.

When you resubmit with the correct URL, we will
gladly post your message.

Moderator on duty


Dear Genners,
I just gained access to a letter written by a family
member in 1981 that mentions a visit to our ancestral
town by two other family members who lived >from the
late 1880's to the mid 20th century. The name of the
town, as this person recalled it, was "Czevnitz",
located "an hour or so outside of Prague."
ShtetlSeeker yielded no exact matches, and there are
just too many variants for me to be certain. Are
there any Czechsperts out there who can look at the
ShtetlSeeker
(http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetl)
and come up with a match?
Best to all,
Judith


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Czevnitz? Czech Republic #general

Judith BERLOWITZ <jberlowitz@...>
 

Dear Judith
The URL you quote below does not lead to the page
you require. The URL you need to give is the general
one, for the ShtetlSeeker.

When you resubmit with the correct URL, we will
gladly post your message.

Moderator on duty


Dear Genners,
I just gained access to a letter written by a family
member in 1981 that mentions a visit to our ancestral
town by two other family members who lived >from the
late 1880's to the mid 20th century. The name of the
town, as this person recalled it, was "Czevnitz",
located "an hour or so outside of Prague."
ShtetlSeeker yielded no exact matches, and there are
just too many variants for me to be certain. Are
there any Czechsperts out there who can look at the
ShtetlSeeker
(http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~shtetl)
and come up with a match?
Best to all,
Judith


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Multiple maiden names and other issues #ukraine

Marcus Byruck <byruckfam@...>
 

Hello all again
(I recently wrote after returning >from a trip to Ukraine and want to thank
all those who have followed-up with their replies and info, and hope more
people will, too. I will post pictures in the next few days at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/)

Meanwhile, I have a couple of follow on questions that I hope someone might
be able to shed light on.

My maternal grandmother gave birth to six children in England. There was a
seventh (the eldest, my mother) who I assume was born in ZHVANETS or nearby
in Ukraine, as there is no birth certificate for her in England. I also
cannot find under the family name TOYBER (or variants) a birth certificate
for the third of the seven children and that I suspect is because they used
a different FAMILY name for him!

However, on the certificates for the other five children, my grandmother
used four DIFFERENT maiden names, none of which I am familiar with: NATHAN,
GLASS, SHERMAN, and STRAIT. I have no idea why she (or whoever reported the
births) would do this. Anyone else have similar experiences? I would have
expected such "sleight-of-hand" in Ukraine or Russia, but why in England?
And should I assume that these are in some way family names?

I was informed by my guide in Ukraine, that if marriages were not
officially registered in Russia (which many were not, since it was
costly), then children born in that marriage would be known by the
authorities by the name of the mother and not the father.

So, maybe my grandmother's MOTHER's name was at least one of the names she
used?

In fact, to this day, I do not know the real maiden name of my grandmother,
which may be none of the above.

She did tell me (this is 50 years ago) that she came >from "STEPANYIVKA"
which I assumed was an invented name, but indeed we found and explored a
village with such a name about 30 miles north of KAMINETS-PODOLSK.

In this tiny village, the local people said Jews had indeed lived there, so
my grandmother may have been speaking truthfully! (This is an area close
to Zarachanko where there is, sadly, a mass grave and marker.)

My grandfather without doubt came >from ZHVANETS. In England, they used the
name TOYBER and TOBER, but I have since found that at least two of the
children used the name TAYLOR or TAYBOR on different situations (army
service in England and electoral rolls). I assume the name in Ukraine was
TAUBER (>from a German origin meaning a "dove" or possible a "deaf one")

I would appreciate if anyone can shed light on some of these issues.

Many thanks

Marcus Byruck


Multiple maiden names and other issues #ukraine

Marcus Byruck <byruckfam@...>
 

Hello all again
(I recently wrote after returning >from a trip to Ukraine and want to thank
all those who have followed-up with their replies and info, and hope more
people will, too. I will post pictures in the next few days at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine/)

Meanwhile, I have a couple of follow on questions that I hope someone might
be able to shed light on.

My maternal grandmother gave birth to six children in England. There was a
seventh (the eldest, my mother) who I assume was born in ZHVANETS or nearby
in Ukraine, as there is no birth certificate for her in England. I also
cannot find under the family name TOYBER (or variants) a birth certificate
for the third of the seven children and that I suspect is because they used
a different FAMILY name for him!

However, on the certificates for the other five children, my grandmother
used four DIFFERENT maiden names, none of which I am familiar with: NATHAN,
GLASS, SHERMAN, and STRAIT. I have no idea why she (or whoever reported the
births) would do this. Anyone else have similar experiences? I would have
expected such "sleight-of-hand" in Ukraine or Russia, but why in England?
And should I assume that these are in some way family names?

I was informed by my guide in Ukraine, that if marriages were not
officially registered in Russia (which many were not, since it was
costly), then children born in that marriage would be known by the
authorities by the name of the mother and not the father.

So, maybe my grandmother's MOTHER's name was at least one of the names she
used?

In fact, to this day, I do not know the real maiden name of my grandmother,
which may be none of the above.

She did tell me (this is 50 years ago) that she came >from "STEPANYIVKA"
which I assumed was an invented name, but indeed we found and explored a
village with such a name about 30 miles north of KAMINETS-PODOLSK.

In this tiny village, the local people said Jews had indeed lived there, so
my grandmother may have been speaking truthfully! (This is an area close
to Zarachanko where there is, sadly, a mass grave and marker.)

My grandfather without doubt came >from ZHVANETS. In England, they used the
name TOYBER and TOBER, but I have since found that at least two of the
children used the name TAYLOR or TAYBOR on different situations (army
service in England and electoral rolls). I assume the name in Ukraine was
TAUBER (>from a German origin meaning a "dove" or possible a "deaf one")

I would appreciate if anyone can shed light on some of these issues.

Many thanks

Marcus Byruck


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine PEKAR Relatives! #ukraine

danielle freedman <daniellefreedman640@...>
 

I too have relatives named PASERSKY /PEKARSKY- but >from the shtetl of
SAKAI (Lithuania) around 1800 - 1870!

Danielle Freedman

PASERSKY - SHAKAI LITHUANIA
ELMAN - TALNOYE UKRAINE
CHOSSID - BANDIR UKRAINE
FRIEDMAN - CIECHANOW WARSAW POLAND
DAVIDOVITCH - ROZALIMUS VOLOST - LITHUANIA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC, Babruvyi Kut, Western Mass JGS #ukraine

Jonathon Podolsky
 

1) I am interested in BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC
from Babruvi Kut, Ukraine. The ones I have found so far settled in Chicago
and worked in the grocery business or settled in Winnipeg. I am interested
in finding anyone interested in Babruvi Kut or the surnames I listed.

2) If you know anyone interested in Jewish genealogy who lives in Western
Massachusetts or Southern Vermont please let me know. I would like to tell
them about our new JGS.

Thanks,
--
Jonathon Podolsky
Founder, Western Massachusetts Jewish Genealogy Society
http://www.wmjgs.org
http://www.Podolsky.cc


Researching surnames: ABEND, HARTMANN, SEIDEN, WASSERMAN, SHIMAN, KRAUT
from Wola Ranizowska near Kolbuszowa, Poland (Galicia region).
PODOLSKY, BAGUS, RUDERMAN, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC >from Babruvi Kut,
Ukraine.


Romania SIG #Romania Buhusi, Malini and Bacau - Romania #romania

storydevi@earthlink.net <storydevi@...>
 

Dear friends,

Trips to Romania are frought with a certain feeling of disappointment since
it is hard to find traces of Jewish History.The synagogue in Bacau is
beautiful and there are two cemetaries.The older one is not kept at all
but has some beautiful stone carving and it is possible to read the stones
nearer the house where the keepers live. The other is in good condition.
The area that was mainly Jewish is now a park and there is no marker.The
street that begins at the HOtel Dumbrova was once a very busy Jewish and
Armenian street.

In the city of Bacau, about 20 km north there are only five Jews left.
HOwveer the synagogue has been repainted and the city is still alive,
albeit very poor. There is a beautiful cemetary that is kept up and in a
barn there is the only horse drawn hearse that I have seen. It is in
excellent condition.If you go north past Falticeni which was a thriving Jewish Center (the
cemetary ahs been destroyed), you arrive in villages that are thriving.I
spent weeks in Malini and discovered that there is one Jewish family still
living there. I interviewed them with a video camera, but it was barely
enough time to move >from obvious details to real discussion.The mother in
the family named Rappaport previously (and now is Marcus) is 87 years old.
Her mother was born in Dorohoi. Near the downtown park was the house of the
David family where all 17 families before the war (during the war the jews
lost everything and were deported to work in terrible conditions in
Falticen) used that house for a synagogue;there was once a mikvah in the
park area. No cemetary. Falticeni was the closest city. It is unusual for
Jews to have lived in villages and they owned no land.

But it is worth the trip since seeing the countryside and how people are
living today can give you a feel of what it was like more than a hundred
years ago, particularly in the villages that have been well kept.

laura
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all future messages with your full name
and location. While discussions of current Romanian Jewish life are
interesting, it is not genealogy. Please continue privately. For those
interested in funding a cemetery for inclusion in the JOWBR please
see www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/submit.htm


Re: "Animal names" among Ashkenazim #general

Charles Vitez <vitez@...>
 

Not really wishing to take sides in this argument, all I would say is that
because of the connotations (as to lack of intelligence) of calling a
daughter a duck or a goose, it is unlikely that a parent would have given
such a name to a daughter. I would also incline to the view that it is an
affectionate form of Katia, where the "t" has elided to "sh" and clean final
vowel to the all embracing "eh".

Charles Vitez

"Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@...> wrote in message
news:Zf7Va.543716$3C2.14033913@......


< MBernet@... > wrote

killshot@... (Lowell Nigoff) writes:

<< I was told my grandmother's name, Kacze or Kachka, ment duck. She
was >from Stepan, Poland. >>

I don't know Polish but in Yiddish, for sure. Katshke is a duck.
(...)

According to Beider's "Personal Names" Katshke is a Slavic name derived
from Katharine;
(...)

Michael Bernet, New York
Michael,

I am a bit curious how do you manage to get >from the duck to Katharine.

Yidish 'kachke' (duck) is directly related to Polish 'Kaczka.' [kah
chkah].
With all my respect to Beider, Slavic female name that is derived from
Katharine is Kasia [kah shyah] or Kaska [Kah shkah] but not Katschke.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Buhusi, Malini and Bacau - Romania #romania

storydevi@earthlink.net <storydevi@...>
 

Dear friends,

Trips to Romania are frought with a certain feeling of disappointment since
it is hard to find traces of Jewish History.The synagogue in Bacau is
beautiful and there are two cemetaries.The older one is not kept at all
but has some beautiful stone carving and it is possible to read the stones
nearer the house where the keepers live. The other is in good condition.
The area that was mainly Jewish is now a park and there is no marker.The
street that begins at the HOtel Dumbrova was once a very busy Jewish and
Armenian street.

In the city of Bacau, about 20 km north there are only five Jews left.
HOwveer the synagogue has been repainted and the city is still alive,
albeit very poor. There is a beautiful cemetary that is kept up and in a
barn there is the only horse drawn hearse that I have seen. It is in
excellent condition.If you go north past Falticeni which was a thriving Jewish Center (the
cemetary ahs been destroyed), you arrive in villages that are thriving.I
spent weeks in Malini and discovered that there is one Jewish family still
living there. I interviewed them with a video camera, but it was barely
enough time to move >from obvious details to real discussion.The mother in
the family named Rappaport previously (and now is Marcus) is 87 years old.
Her mother was born in Dorohoi. Near the downtown park was the house of the
David family where all 17 families before the war (during the war the jews
lost everything and were deported to work in terrible conditions in
Falticen) used that house for a synagogue;there was once a mikvah in the
park area. No cemetary. Falticeni was the closest city. It is unusual for
Jews to have lived in villages and they owned no land.

But it is worth the trip since seeing the countryside and how people are
living today can give you a feel of what it was like more than a hundred
years ago, particularly in the villages that have been well kept.

laura
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all future messages with your full name
and location. While discussions of current Romanian Jewish life are
interesting, it is not genealogy. Please continue privately. For those
interested in funding a cemetery for inclusion in the JOWBR please
see www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/submit.htm


BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC, Babruvyi Kut, Western Mass JGS #ukraine

Jonathon Podolsky
 

1) I am interested in BAGUS, RUDERMAN, PODOLSKY, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC
from Babruvi Kut, Ukraine. The ones I have found so far settled in Chicago
and worked in the grocery business or settled in Winnipeg. I am interested
in finding anyone interested in Babruvi Kut or the surnames I listed.

2) If you know anyone interested in Jewish genealogy who lives in Western
Massachusetts or Southern Vermont please let me know. I would like to tell
them about our new JGS.

Thanks,
--
Jonathon Podolsky
Founder, Western Massachusetts Jewish Genealogy Society
http://www.wmjgs.org
http://www.Podolsky.cc


Researching surnames: ABEND, HARTMANN, SEIDEN, WASSERMAN, SHIMAN, KRAUT
from Wola Ranizowska near Kolbuszowa, Poland (Galicia region).
PODOLSKY, BAGUS, RUDERMAN, MASSARSKY, CARSON, KRICHEC >from Babruvi Kut,
Ukraine.


PEKAR Relatives! #ukraine

danielle freedman <daniellefreedman640@...>
 

I too have relatives named PASERSKY /PEKARSKY- but >from the shtetl of
SAKAI (Lithuania) around 1800 - 1870!

Danielle Freedman

PASERSKY - SHAKAI LITHUANIA
ELMAN - TALNOYE UKRAINE
CHOSSID - BANDIR UKRAINE
FRIEDMAN - CIECHANOW WARSAW POLAND
DAVIDOVITCH - ROZALIMUS VOLOST - LITHUANIA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "Animal names" among Ashkenazim #general

Charles Vitez <vitez@...>
 

Not really wishing to take sides in this argument, all I would say is that
because of the connotations (as to lack of intelligence) of calling a
daughter a duck or a goose, it is unlikely that a parent would have given
such a name to a daughter. I would also incline to the view that it is an
affectionate form of Katia, where the "t" has elided to "sh" and clean final
vowel to the all embracing "eh".

Charles Vitez

"Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@...> wrote in message
news:Zf7Va.543716$3C2.14033913@......


< MBernet@... > wrote

killshot@... (Lowell Nigoff) writes:

<< I was told my grandmother's name, Kacze or Kachka, ment duck. She
was >from Stepan, Poland. >>

I don't know Polish but in Yiddish, for sure. Katshke is a duck.
(...)

According to Beider's "Personal Names" Katshke is a Slavic name derived
from Katharine;
(...)

Michael Bernet, New York
Michael,

I am a bit curious how do you manage to get >from the duck to Katharine.

Yidish 'kachke' (duck) is directly related to Polish 'Kaczka.' [kah
chkah].
With all my respect to Beider, Slavic female name that is derived from
Katharine is Kasia [kah shyah] or Kaska [Kah shkah] but not Katschke.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Images from Kremenets Vital Records #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/and
scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP


Images from Kremenets Vital Records #ukraine

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of JRI-Poland, has been translating
from Russian and Hebrew/Yiddish to English the vital records (birth,
marriage, and death) obtained >from the LDS under an agreement with the
Ukraine Archives. We have developed a set of transliteration aides to
assist our translators with personal names, town names, and keywords
that they encounter in these handwritten records. These transliteration
aides were mentioned at the recent IAJGS Conference in Washington D.C.
Since then we have received several hundred hits on our Shtetlinks
website (http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/) >from people who
wanted to see the image files posted there. Unfortunately, the files
were pretty messed up ... until this morning. Our webmaster, Max Roth,
fixed the problems, and the image files now are available, and visible
the way they were supposed to be. So, if you visited the website before
this morning, please return and take another look.

Here is a list of some of the transliteration aides that you may find
useful in your own research. Each file contains images of the
Hebrew/Yiddish and Russian name (or word/phrase) that appears in the
record, along with the English transliteration we are using on the
Kremenets project. All are accessible on the Kremenets Shtetlinks
website. Point your browser to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/and
scroll down to the appropriate file.

* “Given Names, Male, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of male given names >from the vital records along
with the English transliteration of each name. The images and
transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Male.htm

* “Given Names, Female, Hebrew and Russian graphics”, a file
containing images of female given names >from the vital records
along with the English transliteration of each name. The images
and transliterated names are shown in both Russian and Hebrew. Go
to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Given_Names_Female.htm

* “Occupations, Social Classes & Keywords, Hebrew and Russian
graphics", a file containing images of the occupations listed in
the vital records along with the English translation of each. The
occupations images are in both Russian and Hebrew. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Keywords,%20Hebrew%20and%20Russian%20graphics.htm

* "Town names, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of about 80 town names appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Town_Names-Kremenets.htm

* "Causes of Death, Hebrew and Russian graphics", a file containing
images of the causes of death appearing in the records we have
translated to date. Go to:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/Records_and_transcriptions/guides/
Causes_of_Death_Hebrew_and_Russian_graphics.htm

Keep in mind that development of these image files is an ongoing effort.
As new translations are completed, we add to (and occasionally correct)
the files. Please let me know if you spot a name or word that needs to
be corrected.

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP