Date   

Research University of Antwerp / Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance Mechelen #general

Liesbeth Vantorre <liesbeth.vantorre@...>
 

Dear Madam, dear Sir,

I am a researcher at the University of Antwerp and a temporary staff
member of the Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance in Mechelen,
a city located between Antwerp and Brussels in Belgium. The present
museum is situated in the building which was previously known as the
Kazerne Dossin. It was here that, in 1942, the Nazis established
SS-Sammellager Mecheln. This place was the departure point for a
deportation without return. In the years between 1942 and 1944, 24.916
Jews and 351 Gypsies were transported to the camps in the east.
The museum has a nice collection of photographs, personalia, and
information about the deportees, but the exhibition space is rather
small. For that reason, a new museum is being built on the opposite
side of the 'Kazerne Dossin', after the example of other Jewish
museums in Europe (Berlin, Paris, Amsterdam, London,..). In this
museum the very particular Belgian war situation will be highlighted.
I am responsible for the audiovisual material, more specifically, for
the film material. Next to films about occupied Belgium, the everyday
life during the occupation, actions of the occupying forces, actions
of paramilitary organisations with nazi sympathies, I also looking
for amateur 'home movies', made by Jews who lived in Belgium during
the 1930s and 1940s. The main audience of the museum will be children
and teenagers (12 - 18 years old), and we want to show them that
Jewish people in Belgium had lives like they have themselves: they
went to school, had parties, celebrated birthdays, learned how to walk
and talk, had fun with their brothers, sisters, parents and friends.
That is the kind of material I am looking for: films that depict the
everyday and religious life of Jewish families who lived in Belgium
between 1933 and 1945. In the Netherlands, a lot of this kind of
material has been restored and preserved, so I am almost certain that
there must be similar material for Belgium. Antwerp and Brussels had
very large Jewish communities. Do you have such material, or do you
know people who might have this kind of films? Please contact me. Of
course the staff of the Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance
will handle the film material and the owners with the greatest care
possible.

Thank you very much in advance,
Yours sincerely,

Liesbeth Vantorre
University of Antwerp
Belgium


Missing "J" in German Passports #general

Fred Zimmak <Fred.Zimmak@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Yesterday I wrote about this and that "5 October 1938 all Jewish passports
were declared not guilty in Germany."

An attentive Genner asked about the word "guilty". It should be "not valid".
Sorry for the mistake.

Fred Zimmak / Sweden, Stockholm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Research University of Antwerp / Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance Mechelen #general

Liesbeth Vantorre <liesbeth.vantorre@...>
 

Dear Madam, dear Sir,

I am a researcher at the University of Antwerp and a temporary staff
member of the Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance in Mechelen,
a city located between Antwerp and Brussels in Belgium. The present
museum is situated in the building which was previously known as the
Kazerne Dossin. It was here that, in 1942, the Nazis established
SS-Sammellager Mecheln. This place was the departure point for a
deportation without return. In the years between 1942 and 1944, 24.916
Jews and 351 Gypsies were transported to the camps in the east.
The museum has a nice collection of photographs, personalia, and
information about the deportees, but the exhibition space is rather
small. For that reason, a new museum is being built on the opposite
side of the 'Kazerne Dossin', after the example of other Jewish
museums in Europe (Berlin, Paris, Amsterdam, London,..). In this
museum the very particular Belgian war situation will be highlighted.
I am responsible for the audiovisual material, more specifically, for
the film material. Next to films about occupied Belgium, the everyday
life during the occupation, actions of the occupying forces, actions
of paramilitary organisations with nazi sympathies, I also looking
for amateur 'home movies', made by Jews who lived in Belgium during
the 1930s and 1940s. The main audience of the museum will be children
and teenagers (12 - 18 years old), and we want to show them that
Jewish people in Belgium had lives like they have themselves: they
went to school, had parties, celebrated birthdays, learned how to walk
and talk, had fun with their brothers, sisters, parents and friends.
That is the kind of material I am looking for: films that depict the
everyday and religious life of Jewish families who lived in Belgium
between 1933 and 1945. In the Netherlands, a lot of this kind of
material has been restored and preserved, so I am almost certain that
there must be similar material for Belgium. Antwerp and Brussels had
very large Jewish communities. Do you have such material, or do you
know people who might have this kind of films? Please contact me. Of
course the staff of the Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance
will handle the film material and the owners with the greatest care
possible.

Thank you very much in advance,
Yours sincerely,

Liesbeth Vantorre
University of Antwerp
Belgium


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Missing "J" in German Passports #general

Fred Zimmak <Fred.Zimmak@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Yesterday I wrote about this and that "5 October 1938 all Jewish passports
were declared not guilty in Germany."

An attentive Genner asked about the word "guilty". It should be "not valid".
Sorry for the mistake.

Fred Zimmak / Sweden, Stockholm


Re: More on the Iraqi Jewish Archives Being Reclaimed #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

As a P.S. to Jan's messages:
Harold Rhode was an exciting guest speaker at a JGSPBC Florida meeting quite a few
years ago, presenting slides of his experience in the rescue of the Jewish archival
documents in Iraq. Prior to being our guest, several of our members had heard him
lecture at the IAJGS Conference, where we were mesmerized by the content of his
presentation!
Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita
Genealogical Workbook Editor
JGSPBCI, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: More on the Iraqi Jewish Archives Being Reclaimed #general

Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
 

As a P.S. to Jan's messages:
Harold Rhode was an exciting guest speaker at a JGSPBC Florida meeting quite a few
years ago, presenting slides of his experience in the rescue of the Jewish archival
documents in Iraq. Prior to being our guest, several of our members had heard him
lecture at the IAJGS Conference, where we were mesmerized by the content of his
presentation!
Sylvia
Sylvia Furshman Nusinov
President Emerita
Genealogical Workbook Editor
JGSPBCI, FL


USCIS Genealogy Program #general

Hank Mishkoff
 

I just discovered that the USCIS (United State Citizenship and Immigration
Services)runs what they call a fee-for-service genealogy program at
http://www.uscis.gov/genealogy

Basically, you can pay them $20 for an "index search" in which they'll let you know
what documents they have, and then you can order each document for anywhere >from
$20 to $35. They seem to have about a three-month backlog, which I suspect will
grow as the service becomes more popular.

Hank Mishkoff
Hank@WebFeats.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen USCIS Genealogy Program #general

Hank Mishkoff
 

I just discovered that the USCIS (United State Citizenship and Immigration
Services)runs what they call a fee-for-service genealogy program at
http://www.uscis.gov/genealogy

Basically, you can pay them $20 for an "index search" in which they'll let you know
what documents they have, and then you can order each document for anywhere >from
$20 to $35. They seem to have about a three-month backlog, which I suspect will
grow as the service becomes more popular.

Hank Mishkoff
Hank@WebFeats.com


Volunteers #ukraine

cmw521@...
 

I recently posted to this group suggesting that there are several
possibilities for projects that could and should be done in terms of
indexing projects and other projects to help build the Ukraine database. In
addition to those of you who replied to the mailing list, I received several
replies personally. I have forwarded all of those on to our SIG
coordinator, Freya Blitstein Maslov, who, if she has not done so already,
will be contacting you shortly, I am sure. To all of you, I say be patient,
as we need to identify projects that we can begin immediately - that is,
they don't require much, if any, funding, and records are easily available.
Freya indicated to us that we need someone to coordinate this effort.
Although I am currently unable to do so, the need can't wait. At least one
of you has a few hours a week and some basic organizing skills to create a
spreadsheet and help put together a list of projects. Armed with that, you
can ask those who have and will volunteer, to do whatever the project
requires. The SIGs that are most successful in getting projects underway
have been lucky to find such an individual.

If you are reading this and thinking "Hey, I can do that!", I urge you to
contact Freya or myself. Projects should be organized ultimately by
gubernia, and we have gubernia leaders who can help you organize the
volunteers. If we all work together, there is no limit to what we can do.
There are a lot of us who can help put this all together..

Let us know if you can help.

Chuck Weinstein
Deer Park, NY
cmw521@earthlink.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Volunteers #ukraine

cmw521@...
 

I recently posted to this group suggesting that there are several
possibilities for projects that could and should be done in terms of
indexing projects and other projects to help build the Ukraine database. In
addition to those of you who replied to the mailing list, I received several
replies personally. I have forwarded all of those on to our SIG
coordinator, Freya Blitstein Maslov, who, if she has not done so already,
will be contacting you shortly, I am sure. To all of you, I say be patient,
as we need to identify projects that we can begin immediately - that is,
they don't require much, if any, funding, and records are easily available.
Freya indicated to us that we need someone to coordinate this effort.
Although I am currently unable to do so, the need can't wait. At least one
of you has a few hours a week and some basic organizing skills to create a
spreadsheet and help put together a list of projects. Armed with that, you
can ask those who have and will volunteer, to do whatever the project
requires. The SIGs that are most successful in getting projects underway
have been lucky to find such an individual.

If you are reading this and thinking "Hey, I can do that!", I urge you to
contact Freya or myself. Projects should be organized ultimately by
gubernia, and we have gubernia leaders who can help you organize the
volunteers. If we all work together, there is no limit to what we can do.
There are a lot of us who can help put this all together..

Let us know if you can help.

Chuck Weinstein
Deer Park, NY
cmw521@earthlink.net


Re: Metz - Matusevicius #lithuania

Ernest Fine <efine@...>
 

I've noted that family names are sometimes shown with a Lithuanian spelling,
such as Matusevicius in Sondra's note. Is there any significance to this,
from a genealogical standpoint?
Ernie Fine
Ashburn, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: Sondra Ettlinger [mailto:settlinger@comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2010 10:34 AM
To: LitvakSIG
Subject: [litvaksig] Metz - Matusevicius

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My uncle was Herman Metz (born 1898 in Lithuania) who married Harriett
Diamond in 1940. Herman was living in Staten Island, New York when he
died
in 1995. Both Herman and Harriett are buried at A.M. White Lodge Cemetery
in Totowa, New Jersey. I am researching Herman's branch of the family. I
believe he had three brothers: Robert (b abt. 1888 or 1889), Harry (b
abt.
1889), and Samuel (b abt. 1887). The original family name was
Matusevicius
or Matusevich and they may have come >from the Kaunas (Kovno) area or
district. Their father was Leon (Leyba?) Matusevicus. Some of the
brothers
took the name of Mates or Metes. I have found a grave stone in the A.M.
White Lodge Cemetery in Totowa, N.J. for Norman M. Mates whose name
appears
on the Certificate of Death for my Aunt Harriett. He is listed on the
death
certificate as a nephew, and I believe his father was Uncle Herman's
brother
Robert.

Does anyone in this sig have information about this family? Does anyone
know how I could find out if there are any other Metz or Mates graves in
the
A.M. White Lodge Cemetery in Totowa, N.J.?

Replies could be sent to me privately at settlinger@comcast.net

Sondra Ettlinger


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Metz - Matusevicius #lithuania

Ernest Fine <efine@...>
 

I've noted that family names are sometimes shown with a Lithuanian spelling,
such as Matusevicius in Sondra's note. Is there any significance to this,
from a genealogical standpoint?
Ernie Fine
Ashburn, VA

-----Original Message-----
From: Sondra Ettlinger [mailto:settlinger@comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2010 10:34 AM
To: LitvakSIG
Subject: [litvaksig] Metz - Matusevicius

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My uncle was Herman Metz (born 1898 in Lithuania) who married Harriett
Diamond in 1940. Herman was living in Staten Island, New York when he
died
in 1995. Both Herman and Harriett are buried at A.M. White Lodge Cemetery
in Totowa, New Jersey. I am researching Herman's branch of the family. I
believe he had three brothers: Robert (b abt. 1888 or 1889), Harry (b
abt.
1889), and Samuel (b abt. 1887). The original family name was
Matusevicius
or Matusevich and they may have come >from the Kaunas (Kovno) area or
district. Their father was Leon (Leyba?) Matusevicus. Some of the
brothers
took the name of Mates or Metes. I have found a grave stone in the A.M.
White Lodge Cemetery in Totowa, N.J. for Norman M. Mates whose name
appears
on the Certificate of Death for my Aunt Harriett. He is listed on the
death
certificate as a nephew, and I believe his father was Uncle Herman's
brother
Robert.

Does anyone in this sig have information about this family? Does anyone
know how I could find out if there are any other Metz or Mates graves in
the
A.M. White Lodge Cemetery in Totowa, N.J.?

Replies could be sent to me privately at settlinger@comcast.net

Sondra Ettlinger


Re: Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th Century #lithuania

Shoshana L. Boublil
 

Subject: Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th Century
From: Allan Lichtenstein <allanli@optonline.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 11:04:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

My father left Lithuania as a young boy some time during the period of
the WWI/Russian Revolution. Instead of taking the usual route via
England the family traveled via Japan and entered South Africa through
Durban.

I understand that many Jews emigrating to the US during this
time also took this route arriving in the US at various west coast
ports, such as Seattle. I am interested to find out whether anyone knows
more about this journey across Russia via Japan to South Africa and the
US - how they traveled across Russia, where they stayed in Japan. who
organized their stay, how their trips to the US and South Africa were
organized, etc.
My grandfather followed a similar route, except that after arriving in
Seattle, he travelled to New York to relatives there.

He travelled >from the Lith.-Latvia border area with his brother and a man
named Rakach, across Siberia and then south to China and >from there they
took a boat to Japan, and >from there they took a boat to Seattle. They
arrived in the USA in 1915.

My father has told me some stories about their travels, but not many. I
know they were caught on the Russia-China Siberian border, but thanks to an
officer named Shapiro, they were "allowed" to escape and reach China.

I'll ask if he knows anymore.

Shoshana L. Boublil

Researching: SKAIST; KORB; EPSTEIN; RUBNICH; ARBIV; BOUBLIL; DEVORETZ


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th Century #lithuania

Shoshana L. Boublil
 

Subject: Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th Century
From: Allan Lichtenstein <allanli@optonline.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 11:04:23 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

My father left Lithuania as a young boy some time during the period of
the WWI/Russian Revolution. Instead of taking the usual route via
England the family traveled via Japan and entered South Africa through
Durban.

I understand that many Jews emigrating to the US during this
time also took this route arriving in the US at various west coast
ports, such as Seattle. I am interested to find out whether anyone knows
more about this journey across Russia via Japan to South Africa and the
US - how they traveled across Russia, where they stayed in Japan. who
organized their stay, how their trips to the US and South Africa were
organized, etc.
My grandfather followed a similar route, except that after arriving in
Seattle, he travelled to New York to relatives there.

He travelled >from the Lith.-Latvia border area with his brother and a man
named Rakach, across Siberia and then south to China and >from there they
took a boat to Japan, and >from there they took a boat to Seattle. They
arrived in the USA in 1915.

My father has told me some stories about their travels, but not many. I
know they were caught on the Russia-China Siberian border, but thanks to an
officer named Shapiro, they were "allowed" to escape and reach China.

I'll ask if he knows anymore.

Shoshana L. Boublil

Researching: SKAIST; KORB; EPSTEIN; RUBNICH; ARBIV; BOUBLIL; DEVORETZ


Re: Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th Century #lithuania

Ernest Fine <efine@...>
 

I've been working with a family in Australia that is trying to determine if
we are related. Their Lithuanian ancestor took the Trans-Siberian railroad
across Russia around the same time period, then went to Shanghai. Stayed
there for a couple decades, then migrated to Australia. The family has no
written material on this journey, only vague anecdotal stories.

I'd wondered if old records are available >from the Trans-Siberian railroad,
but neither of the two e-mail addresses I can find on the Russian Railways
website are valid. See http://www.rzd.ru/ - the "Eng" at the top right of
the screen gets you the English version. An e-mail address for "information"
in the English version doesn't work, and an e-mail address in the Russian
version, apparently for the legal department, doesn't work either. Anybody
in Russia want to take a crack at this?

Ernie Fine
Ashburn, VA, USA

-----Original Message-----
From: Allan Lichtenstein [mailto:allanli@optonline.net]
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2010 11:04 AM
To: LitvakSIG
Subject: [litvaksig] Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th
Century

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My father left Lithuania as a young boy some time during the period of
the WWI/Russian Revolution. Instead of taking the usual route via
England the family traveled via Japan and entered South Africa through
Durban.

I understand that many Jews emigrating to the US during this
time also took this route arriving in the US at various west coast
ports, such as Seattle. I am interested to find out whether anyone knows
more about this journey across Russia via Japan to South Africa and the
US - how they traveled across Russia, where they stayed in Japan. who
organized their stay, how their trips to the US and South Africa were
organized, etc.

Thanks

Allan Lichtenstein
allanli@optonline.net


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania RE: Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th Century #lithuania

Ernest Fine <efine@...>
 

I've been working with a family in Australia that is trying to determine if
we are related. Their Lithuanian ancestor took the Trans-Siberian railroad
across Russia around the same time period, then went to Shanghai. Stayed
there for a couple decades, then migrated to Australia. The family has no
written material on this journey, only vague anecdotal stories.

I'd wondered if old records are available >from the Trans-Siberian railroad,
but neither of the two e-mail addresses I can find on the Russian Railways
website are valid. See http://www.rzd.ru/ - the "Eng" at the top right of
the screen gets you the English version. An e-mail address for "information"
in the English version doesn't work, and an e-mail address in the Russian
version, apparently for the legal department, doesn't work either. Anybody
in Russia want to take a crack at this?

Ernie Fine
Ashburn, VA, USA

-----Original Message-----
From: Allan Lichtenstein [mailto:allanli@optonline.net]
Sent: Monday, January 18, 2010 11:04 AM
To: LitvakSIG
Subject: [litvaksig] Traveling to the US via Japan in the early 20th
Century

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
My father left Lithuania as a young boy some time during the period of
the WWI/Russian Revolution. Instead of taking the usual route via
England the family traveled via Japan and entered South Africa through
Durban.

I understand that many Jews emigrating to the US during this
time also took this route arriving in the US at various west coast
ports, such as Seattle. I am interested to find out whether anyone knows
more about this journey across Russia via Japan to South Africa and the
US - how they traveled across Russia, where they stayed in Japan. who
organized their stay, how their trips to the US and South Africa were
organized, etc.

Thanks

Allan Lichtenstein
allanli@optonline.net


Re: birth certificates from Canada #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

joangr@aol.com wrote:
My cousin has asked for help in finding her mother's birth certificate.
Born in Ottowa but the date is not certain, her mother lied about her age.
Even though the mother lied about her age, you should be able to get an approximate
age. Also, note that people who lie about their age are likely to keep the same
birthday and just change the year. Birth registrations in Ontario >from 1869 to
1912 are available >from the Archives of Ontario,
http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/archival-records/interloan/vsmain.aspx
It seems like these are not available on-line but only in microfilm. After 1913,
the registrations are held by the Office of the Registrar General (contact
information listed in that web page). If the mother is deceased, as next-of-kin
your cousin should be able to get a birth certificate: see
http://www.ontario.ca/en/services_for_residents/121591

Robert Israel israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: birth certificates from Canada #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

joangr@aol.com wrote:
My cousin has asked for help in finding her mother's birth certificate.
Born in Ottowa but the date is not certain, her mother lied about her age.
Even though the mother lied about her age, you should be able to get an approximate
age. Also, note that people who lie about their age are likely to keep the same
birthday and just change the year. Birth registrations in Ontario >from 1869 to
1912 are available >from the Archives of Ontario,
http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/archival-records/interloan/vsmain.aspx
It seems like these are not available on-line but only in microfilm. After 1913,
the registrations are held by the Office of the Registrar General (contact
information listed in that web page). If the mother is deceased, as next-of-kin
your cousin should be able to get a birth certificate: see
http://www.ontario.ca/en/services_for_residents/121591

Robert Israel israel@math.MyUniversitysInitials.ca
University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada


National Archives (USA) Pubic Meeting on the Needs of the Research Community #general

Jan Meisels Allen <janmallen@...>
 

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) of the United States has
issued the following announcement:

There will be a public meeting on Friday, January 29 at 1 PM in the researcher's
lobby on the first floor of the Pennsylvania Avenue side of the National Archives
building, to discuss how the National Archives meets the needs of the research
community. This will not be a discussion of the details of the research room
layout, but rather about researcher needs, and how to meet those needs. There will
be a presentation, followed by an open discussion. US Archivist Ferriero and
Michael Kurtz will be the speakers, and David McMillen, NARA External Public
Relations, will moderate the program.

The National Archives is interested in hearing >from the research community what it
can do to make it easier for you to research at the National Archives. US
Archivist Ferriero is willing to listen to researchers and he is open to
suggestions on how to make our work easier and more productive in our search for
our ancestors.

David Ferriero was sworn in as the 10th US Archivist on January 13th. If you would
like to read his remarks or see them via webcast you can do so >from the National
Archives Site: http://www.archives.gov/index.html

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS, Director-at-large
Chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen National Archives (USA) Pubic Meeting on the Needs of the Research Community #general

Jan Meisels Allen <janmallen@...>
 

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) of the United States has
issued the following announcement:

There will be a public meeting on Friday, January 29 at 1 PM in the researcher's
lobby on the first floor of the Pennsylvania Avenue side of the National Archives
building, to discuss how the National Archives meets the needs of the research
community. This will not be a discussion of the details of the research room
layout, but rather about researcher needs, and how to meet those needs. There will
be a presentation, followed by an open discussion. US Archivist Ferriero and
Michael Kurtz will be the speakers, and David McMillen, NARA External Public
Relations, will moderate the program.

The National Archives is interested in hearing >from the research community what it
can do to make it easier for you to research at the National Archives. US
Archivist Ferriero is willing to listen to researchers and he is open to
suggestions on how to make our work easier and more productive in our search for
our ancestors.

David Ferriero was sworn in as the 10th US Archivist on January 13th. If you would
like to read his remarks or see them via webcast you can do so >from the National
Archives Site: http://www.archives.gov/index.html

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS, Director-at-large
Chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring Committee