Date   

Sabile. Birth records from 1882 to 1885. Death records from 1894 to 1913 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Latvia SIG #Latvia Sabile. Birth records from 1882 to 1885. Death records from 1894 to 1913 #latvia

Christine Usdin
 


Re: locating two sisters (Burtel and Spungan) whose address during WW 2 was Kreutzburg, Latvia #latvia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

David Priever asked about Burtel, Spungan, and Druck relatives who
lived in Kreutzburg (Krustpils) during or before WWII. The 1940
Latvia telephone directory is a free online resource that can
sometimes provide clues to help solve family mysteries like David's.
This directory is full-text and soundex searchable on my website
http://genealogyindexer.org (change the "Any Place" drop-down to
"Latvia"), and there is also a town index at
http://genealogyindexer.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1532 that is useful
for jumping to a town's entries, if you are only interested in one or
a few small places, rather than searching across the entire directory.

For example, in the Krustpils section (images 313-314), there are
several entries with David's surnames:

Druk L. (bij. Rabinovic), gatavu damu un kungu apgerbu veikals, Rigas 175

Spungins Genochs, Rigas 128

Spungins Josels, tirgot., Rigas 74

The first of these indicates a prior surname, two provide occupations,
two given names, and all street addresses (and phone numbers, omitted
here).

The 1940 Latvia telephone directory (Latvijas 1940. g. Telefona
Abonentu Saraksts) was made available online thanks to Yad Vashem, who
provided copies and granted permission, and with help >from Randy
Herschaft. If you have a success using this directory, please tell me
so I can share the good news with them.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
near Washington, D.C.


Latvia SIG #Latvia re: locating two sisters (Burtel and Spungan) whose address during WW 2 was Kreutzburg, Latvia #latvia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

David Priever asked about Burtel, Spungan, and Druck relatives who
lived in Kreutzburg (Krustpils) during or before WWII. The 1940
Latvia telephone directory is a free online resource that can
sometimes provide clues to help solve family mysteries like David's.
This directory is full-text and soundex searchable on my website
http://genealogyindexer.org (change the "Any Place" drop-down to
"Latvia"), and there is also a town index at
http://genealogyindexer.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1532 that is useful
for jumping to a town's entries, if you are only interested in one or
a few small places, rather than searching across the entire directory.

For example, in the Krustpils section (images 313-314), there are
several entries with David's surnames:

Druk L. (bij. Rabinovic), gatavu damu un kungu apgerbu veikals, Rigas 175

Spungins Genochs, Rigas 128

Spungins Josels, tirgot., Rigas 74

The first of these indicates a prior surname, two provide occupations,
two given names, and all street addresses (and phone numbers, omitted
here).

The 1940 Latvia telephone directory (Latvijas 1940. g. Telefona
Abonentu Saraksts) was made available online thanks to Yad Vashem, who
provided copies and granted permission, and with help >from Randy
Herschaft. If you have a success using this directory, please tell me
so I can share the good news with them.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
near Washington, D.C.


Re: All Russian Census of 1897 #latvia

Barbara Krueger <bkrue@...>
 

The page asks me to sign in and it is not my Jewish Gen sign up it
wants. How can I get into the db?

I want to search Lin Bortz Ballonoff Palonov and Cohen

The All Russian Census for Latvia is here:

http://www.lvva-raduraksti.lv/en/menu/lv/12/ig/12.html

Good luck, Lorraine!

Martha


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: All Russian Census of 1897 #latvia

Barbara Krueger <bkrue@...>
 

The page asks me to sign in and it is not my Jewish Gen sign up it
wants. How can I get into the db?

I want to search Lin Bortz Ballonoff Palonov and Cohen

The All Russian Census for Latvia is here:

http://www.lvva-raduraksti.lv/en/menu/lv/12/ig/12.html

Good luck, Lorraine!

Martha


My Ancestor Was Jewish - Wed 7 September 2011 - Afternoon Course #unitedkingdom

LAURENCE HARRIS
 

The Socity of Genealogists (London) are running a half-day course titled My Ancestor was Jewish on the afternoon of Wednesday 7 September, 2011.

Full details of the course, including course outline, costs and booking details can be found at
http://www.societyofgenealogists.com/my-ancestor-was-jewish-a-half-day-course-on-7-september-2011/

Laurence Harris
Pinner, Middlesex


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom My Ancestor Was Jewish - Wed 7 September 2011 - Afternoon Course #unitedkingdom

LAURENCE HARRIS
 

The Socity of Genealogists (London) are running a half-day course titled My Ancestor was Jewish on the afternoon of Wednesday 7 September, 2011.

Full details of the course, including course outline, costs and booking details can be found at
http://www.societyofgenealogists.com/my-ancestor-was-jewish-a-half-day-course-on-7-september-2011/

Laurence Harris
Pinner, Middlesex


Re: Report from Washington #austria-czech

Robert Fraser
 

Two rather obvious questions come to mind:

1 - who are the 'we', who decided to thus utilise
AustriaCzech funds?

2 - would it not be more democratic to poll all A/C members
(many of whom have contributed the money, including my
humble self) to seek their approval on this use of the
funds? $US10,000 is a lot of money in anyone's terms. We're
not talking about small purchases >from the petty cashbox.

Robert Fraser
Perth, Western Australia


Snip>>>
At our meeting , we unanimously decided to use the funds
held in our AustriaCzech general account (currently about
$10,000) to support the Czech State Archives in their
efforts to make all of these materials available to us on
the Internet.

Further donations to this effort can be made online to the
Austria-Czech SIG General Fund via

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.as
p?project_cat=8

Please let me know if there are any serious objections to
this use of our funds. All of these projects are essential
for the progress of our genealogical work. With the records
available, we can then set up projects to index the
documents, much as the other SIGs have done with their
records.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech RE: Report from Washington #austria-czech

Robert Fraser
 

Two rather obvious questions come to mind:

1 - who are the 'we', who decided to thus utilise
AustriaCzech funds?

2 - would it not be more democratic to poll all A/C members
(many of whom have contributed the money, including my
humble self) to seek their approval on this use of the
funds? $US10,000 is a lot of money in anyone's terms. We're
not talking about small purchases >from the petty cashbox.

Robert Fraser
Perth, Western Australia


Snip>>>
At our meeting , we unanimously decided to use the funds
held in our AustriaCzech general account (currently about
$10,000) to support the Czech State Archives in their
efforts to make all of these materials available to us on
the Internet.

Further donations to this effort can be made online to the
Austria-Czech SIG General Fund via

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.as
p?project_cat=8

Please let me know if there are any serious objections to
this use of our funds. All of these projects are essential
for the progress of our genealogical work. With the records
available, we can then set up projects to index the
documents, much as the other SIGs have done with their
records.


Re: Strange entry at All Poland Database #galicia

David Scriven
 

Dear All,

Mark Halpern wrote:

First, let's talk about civil marriages. The Hasidic movement
spread rapidly throughout Galicia in the 18th century. Hasidic
leaders wielded great power in the community. Roughly 6 of 7
Galician Jews were Hasidim. Marriage was an area of great
contention between the Crown and the Hasidic leadership of the
Jewish community. The Crown designated and paid one Rabbi in
each district to perform marriages. These Rabbi's were usually
more secular than the majority Hasidim of the community. So it
was normal for the Jews to resist the mandate for civil marriage.
Jews were married under a Chupa in a purely religious ceremony,
which was not ever registered with the Crown. Therefore, you will
not find many civil marriages in the JRI-Poland database.
My great-grandfather was Hassidic and the birth records of his
children, all born between 1880 & 1902, show them as 'nieslubna'
- illegitimate. However, there is an added notation that shows
that he engaged in a civil marriage in 1916 and that he
acknowledged each of the children as his.

My question is - why the change? - was there a compelling reason,
e.g. pressure >from the state? - did the attitude of the Hassidic
community change? - or does it relate to our particular family
circumstances - whatever they were?

David Scriven,
Vancouver, Canada
Researching: SINGER, RUSS, POMERANZ, ACHTEL, WANG


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Strange entry at All Poland Database #galicia

David Scriven
 

Dear All,

Mark Halpern wrote:

First, let's talk about civil marriages. The Hasidic movement
spread rapidly throughout Galicia in the 18th century. Hasidic
leaders wielded great power in the community. Roughly 6 of 7
Galician Jews were Hasidim. Marriage was an area of great
contention between the Crown and the Hasidic leadership of the
Jewish community. The Crown designated and paid one Rabbi in
each district to perform marriages. These Rabbi's were usually
more secular than the majority Hasidim of the community. So it
was normal for the Jews to resist the mandate for civil marriage.
Jews were married under a Chupa in a purely religious ceremony,
which was not ever registered with the Crown. Therefore, you will
not find many civil marriages in the JRI-Poland database.
My great-grandfather was Hassidic and the birth records of his
children, all born between 1880 & 1902, show them as 'nieslubna'
- illegitimate. However, there is an added notation that shows
that he engaged in a civil marriage in 1916 and that he
acknowledged each of the children as his.

My question is - why the change? - was there a compelling reason,
e.g. pressure >from the state? - did the attitude of the Hassidic
community change? - or does it relate to our particular family
circumstances - whatever they were?

David Scriven,
Vancouver, Canada
Researching: SINGER, RUSS, POMERANZ, ACHTEL, WANG


Re: NYC area cemeteries #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

I wonder if it is possible to recognize graves of my family in the
New York area. Could me somebody help to find them?
I look for the grave of Rudolf Lewis BAER and others
May thanks for your help in advance

Yours Hansmartin Unger Switzerland hansmartin.unger@...


German SIG #Germany Re: NYC area cemeteries #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

I wonder if it is possible to recognize graves of my family in the
New York area. Could me somebody help to find them?
I look for the grave of Rudolf Lewis BAER and others
May thanks for your help in advance

Yours Hansmartin Unger Switzerland hansmartin.unger@...


New On-Line Resources for German-Jewish Family Research #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear GerSIG friends:

What an exhilarating week it's been! The IAJGS conference in my home
town of Vashinkten, DeSea (as a legendary entry to the FamilyFinder once
had it) brought insight, reunions, new friendships, opportunities for
projects and many more joys in a stream that seemed unending.

All five of GerSIG's directors (we used to be coordinators) were there,
and so were more than 100 enthusiastic members of our group. Hans Hirsch
celebrated his 95th birthday, Allan Hirsh his 91st; Alex Calzareth
announced a milestone in the Aufbau Indexing Project and I got to rattle
on about GerSIG's first ongoing database project, the Name Adoption List
inDEX, aka NALDEX.

Some of that rattling came during my presentation about new and
not-so-new Web resources. In exchange for neither showing nor reading
aloud the URLs of the sites I displayed, I promised to post those URLs
as soon as possible. Here we go, in no particular order:

First of all, there are the many not-so-new sites that some of us
haven't used yet.

http://wikipedia.org
is something I consult every day. Along with its
many other uses, it's very handy for finding the modern names of towns
no longer in Germany. Here's one way: >from the global start page (the
URL given here), put in a town name and select Deutsch as your language
of choice. This should take you to a wikipedia.de page with the town's
modern name as its title. If you don't speak enough German yet, go to
the sidebar and click on the "English" link that's almost certainly
there--and you've found your English-language page for the town.
Perhaps a little roundabout, but the German 'pedia is the best at
redirecting >from older names to new.

http://www.verwaltungsgeschichte.de/
is Michael Rademacher's German historical gazetteer.
Nothing fancy here, not even a search function--just the administrative
structure of the entire Reich as it was before and after WW I, plus many
other useful features.

There's a page for every Kreis (county); that page contains the name
of every city, town and village in the Kreis, with population figures >from
various times (often broken down by religion), descriptions of the
larger cities, links to provincial government, courts, military and
religious units, etc. Click on "Ortsbuch" and away you go. Ancient web
technology, timeless info.

http://gov.genealogy.net/
is part of a German-language wiki devoted to genealogy. It does much
of the same work as Rademacher's site, but with search functions and
some nice graphical representations of how the governmental
hierarchies worked over time.

Among actual databases of names are:

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.en
-- the German memorial book -- is unique. Most of the information
is also available via http://www.yadvashem.org/, but this site is
updated frequently, and those in charge are willing to accept corrections
and fix entries.

http://adressbuch.zlb.de/ -- the Berlin address books.
Click on "Suche [etc.]" to search, pick a time period, then a year,
then section I. for that year, then a letter of the alphabet.
from there, it's like using, well, an address or phone directory.
Date range is 1799-1943.

http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en
is the Polish State Archives vital records sources database.
English-language search page, menu boxes and results in Polish;
but the help pages (links in the sidebar) explain the key terms, including
the Polish word for "Jewish." Well, at least the one that the PSA uses.

http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/
has fascinating pages about many Jewish communities in southern Germany:
the Palatinate, Baden, Wuerttemberg, Bavaria.
Check back for new stuff--there's always more.

http://maps.google.com/ -- we all use the GoogleMap-based community maps
attached to the Town Finder pages, but the main site does much more,
such as calculating distances between places. Just how close were Oma's
and Opa's home towns to one another?

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp
is here for completeness' sake. Sometimes tricky, sometimes inaccurate, but
we do still need to consult those films or at least know that they're out there.

And, because I can't pass up the chance to mention it again,
http://www.jewishgen.org/JGFF/
-- the Family Finder. Why in heaven's name would anyone want to do research
when they could be corresponding with the people--perhaps their own
cousins--who have already been doing it?
This is Jewish genealogy's single most powerful tool.

---------------------------------------

Now, some more recent stuff.

http://www.lbi.org/ is working on putting its collections on-line.
_All_ of them, to the extent possible. In downloadable form. Berthold
Rosenthal's thousands of pages of transcriptions of documents of Baden's
Jewry. (That one's been good for me, to the tune of at least 700
relatives!) The Rudolf Simonis collection. John Henry Richter's
collection. Charles Stanton's. Hundreds of family collections, some of
them truly remarkable. Come to think of it: why not donate a copy of
_your_ working papers to LBI? They won't put them on line if you don't
want that. Besides, their storage facilities are more fire- and
waterproof than your spare bedroom is, I'll bet.

http://agora.sub.uni-hamburg.de/subhh-adress/digbib/start
is much like http://adressbuch.zlb.de/, only for Hamburg instead of Berlin
(see above). Goes up to 1919, plus the 1926 phone book. Germany's
4th-largest Jewish community, back in the day.

http://www.ancestry.com/ costs money, but if some of your folks lived in
Germany in the 1930s, or served in the Bavarian Army in WW I, you should
definitely take their introductory offer and find out how good your
self-discipline is when the trial period ends. (For those of you lucky
enough to have a nearby public library or similar institution that
subscribes to the web site, so much the better!) The Bavarian army's
muster books contain enormously rich information about each soldier,
often repeated in 5 or 6 different books, and the lists of German Jews
who had their citizenship revoked are also noteworthy.

https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/startbild.php?bestand=5632
is the first instance of what I hope will be a general trend: German
archives putting the original vital records on line. They're behind the
curve, mind you: http://lvva-raduraksti.lv/en.html is Latvia's amazing
home of all vital records (Jewish and Gentile) over 100 years old.
Almost 2 terabytes, almost 6 million images. But Baden-Wuerttemberg has
taken an important first step by giving us images >from the so-called
Gatermann films, the originals of which no longer exist. These are
vital records and family registers >from hundreds of towns, generally
from the period 1808--1875. Many of the images are hard to read even if
you're Gerhard Buck (who gave a fine introduction to German script at
the conference); but in many cases they're all we have.

Logan Kleinwaks has given us http://genealogyindexer.org/, an index of
street directories and the like. Mostly central and eastern Europe.
All of it full of unexpected finds.

---------------------------------------

Finally, our SIG's very own projects are bearing fruit.

_Der Aufbau_ was New York's German-language Jewish weekly newspaper >from
1934 until 2002. In this case, New York's outer boroughs extended to
Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires and Los Angeles. Marriage, anniversary and
death announcements included both current and former (i.e., German)
towns. An "Eingetroffen" column in each week's paper reported on moves
to New York, and there were several "searching for" lists, some provided
by Jewish rescue agencies.

Working with Harry Katzman, Alex Calzareth has led the effort to index
these many entries, some of which are truly moving to read even for
readers who have no connections to the families and persons mentioned.
http://calzareth.com/aufbau/ will take you to the Heights and all the
other neighborhoods where our folks settled in the Western hemisphere.
At this moment, all entries >from the 1940s have been indexed, and there
are plenty >from other times as well.

Finally, the Name Adoption List inDEX (NALDEX) is ripe for the searching
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Germany/Naldex.htm. Here you can
find the names of over 16,000 heads of household, almost all >from
Prussia, who, in the course of emancipation, became citizens with most
if not all the rights of their Gentile neighbors in the period
1790-1860. Currently the only non-Prussian area covered by Phase 1 of
the project is Lippe-Detmold, which reported 256 households. Some of
the lists provide little more than place-name and old and new names of
the head of household; others list spouses, children, the head of
household's occupation and more.

The response to NALDEX has been wonderful. At some point, everyone who
has commented on it has used the word "more." There certainly is
more--not least a published Prussian list >from 1846 that nobody knew
about until Logan Kleinwaks stumbled upon it a few days ago. It will
become part of NALDEX soon; meanwhile we'll be looking to see whether
there are more like it hiding in similar plain sight. We'll be
reporting the project status regularly, I hope.

------------------------------------------

Thanks to all who made this conference unforgettable. Also, thanks to
the GerSIGgers who showed up, pitched in, hosted, helped out and
otherwise made everyone feel at home--even those of us who _were_ at home.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG


Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of Lwow #galicia

Norbert Weinberg <norofra@...>
 

I have been queried by Dorit Morag, who has a Facebook group,
"Irgun Yotsei Lwow V' hasviva" (Organization of Lwow Origin Jews),
on her great grandfather, Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of
Lwow. I found one reference to him as author of an introduction
to "Sefer Maaseh Gevurot Hashem", Lwow, 1916, by Saul Mander. If
anyone has information leads, please let me know and I will
forward it to her.

Thank you,

Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@...
http://karmisheli.blogspot.com

Researching Family Records of
WEINBERG (Dolyna/Ukraine, Vienna/Austria, Frankfurt AM, Germany)
ZARWANITZER (Dolyna/Ukraine)
IGER (Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine)
GOTTDENKER (Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine)


German SIG #Germany New On-Line Resources for German-Jewish Family Research #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear GerSIG friends:

What an exhilarating week it's been! The IAJGS conference in my home
town of Vashinkten, DeSea (as a legendary entry to the FamilyFinder once
had it) brought insight, reunions, new friendships, opportunities for
projects and many more joys in a stream that seemed unending.

All five of GerSIG's directors (we used to be coordinators) were there,
and so were more than 100 enthusiastic members of our group. Hans Hirsch
celebrated his 95th birthday, Allan Hirsh his 91st; Alex Calzareth
announced a milestone in the Aufbau Indexing Project and I got to rattle
on about GerSIG's first ongoing database project, the Name Adoption List
inDEX, aka NALDEX.

Some of that rattling came during my presentation about new and
not-so-new Web resources. In exchange for neither showing nor reading
aloud the URLs of the sites I displayed, I promised to post those URLs
as soon as possible. Here we go, in no particular order:

First of all, there are the many not-so-new sites that some of us
haven't used yet.

http://wikipedia.org
is something I consult every day. Along with its
many other uses, it's very handy for finding the modern names of towns
no longer in Germany. Here's one way: >from the global start page (the
URL given here), put in a town name and select Deutsch as your language
of choice. This should take you to a wikipedia.de page with the town's
modern name as its title. If you don't speak enough German yet, go to
the sidebar and click on the "English" link that's almost certainly
there--and you've found your English-language page for the town.
Perhaps a little roundabout, but the German 'pedia is the best at
redirecting >from older names to new.

http://www.verwaltungsgeschichte.de/
is Michael Rademacher's German historical gazetteer.
Nothing fancy here, not even a search function--just the administrative
structure of the entire Reich as it was before and after WW I, plus many
other useful features.

There's a page for every Kreis (county); that page contains the name
of every city, town and village in the Kreis, with population figures >from
various times (often broken down by religion), descriptions of the
larger cities, links to provincial government, courts, military and
religious units, etc. Click on "Ortsbuch" and away you go. Ancient web
technology, timeless info.

http://gov.genealogy.net/
is part of a German-language wiki devoted to genealogy. It does much
of the same work as Rademacher's site, but with search functions and
some nice graphical representations of how the governmental
hierarchies worked over time.

Among actual databases of names are:

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.en
-- the German memorial book -- is unique. Most of the information
is also available via http://www.yadvashem.org/, but this site is
updated frequently, and those in charge are willing to accept corrections
and fix entries.

http://adressbuch.zlb.de/ -- the Berlin address books.
Click on "Suche [etc.]" to search, pick a time period, then a year,
then section I. for that year, then a letter of the alphabet.
from there, it's like using, well, an address or phone directory.
Date range is 1799-1943.

http://baza.archiwa.gov.pl/sezam/pradziad.php?l=en
is the Polish State Archives vital records sources database.
English-language search page, menu boxes and results in Polish;
but the help pages (links in the sidebar) explain the key terms, including
the Polish word for "Jewish." Well, at least the one that the PSA uses.

http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/
has fascinating pages about many Jewish communities in southern Germany:
the Palatinate, Baden, Wuerttemberg, Bavaria.
Check back for new stuff--there's always more.

http://maps.google.com/ -- we all use the GoogleMap-based community maps
attached to the Town Finder pages, but the main site does much more,
such as calculating distances between places. Just how close were Oma's
and Opa's home towns to one another?

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp
is here for completeness' sake. Sometimes tricky, sometimes inaccurate, but
we do still need to consult those films or at least know that they're out there.

And, because I can't pass up the chance to mention it again,
http://www.jewishgen.org/JGFF/
-- the Family Finder. Why in heaven's name would anyone want to do research
when they could be corresponding with the people--perhaps their own
cousins--who have already been doing it?
This is Jewish genealogy's single most powerful tool.

---------------------------------------

Now, some more recent stuff.

http://www.lbi.org/ is working on putting its collections on-line.
_All_ of them, to the extent possible. In downloadable form. Berthold
Rosenthal's thousands of pages of transcriptions of documents of Baden's
Jewry. (That one's been good for me, to the tune of at least 700
relatives!) The Rudolf Simonis collection. John Henry Richter's
collection. Charles Stanton's. Hundreds of family collections, some of
them truly remarkable. Come to think of it: why not donate a copy of
_your_ working papers to LBI? They won't put them on line if you don't
want that. Besides, their storage facilities are more fire- and
waterproof than your spare bedroom is, I'll bet.

http://agora.sub.uni-hamburg.de/subhh-adress/digbib/start
is much like http://adressbuch.zlb.de/, only for Hamburg instead of Berlin
(see above). Goes up to 1919, plus the 1926 phone book. Germany's
4th-largest Jewish community, back in the day.

http://www.ancestry.com/ costs money, but if some of your folks lived in
Germany in the 1930s, or served in the Bavarian Army in WW I, you should
definitely take their introductory offer and find out how good your
self-discipline is when the trial period ends. (For those of you lucky
enough to have a nearby public library or similar institution that
subscribes to the web site, so much the better!) The Bavarian army's
muster books contain enormously rich information about each soldier,
often repeated in 5 or 6 different books, and the lists of German Jews
who had their citizenship revoked are also noteworthy.

https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/startbild.php?bestand=5632
is the first instance of what I hope will be a general trend: German
archives putting the original vital records on line. They're behind the
curve, mind you: http://lvva-raduraksti.lv/en.html is Latvia's amazing
home of all vital records (Jewish and Gentile) over 100 years old.
Almost 2 terabytes, almost 6 million images. But Baden-Wuerttemberg has
taken an important first step by giving us images >from the so-called
Gatermann films, the originals of which no longer exist. These are
vital records and family registers >from hundreds of towns, generally
from the period 1808--1875. Many of the images are hard to read even if
you're Gerhard Buck (who gave a fine introduction to German script at
the conference); but in many cases they're all we have.

Logan Kleinwaks has given us http://genealogyindexer.org/, an index of
street directories and the like. Mostly central and eastern Europe.
All of it full of unexpected finds.

---------------------------------------

Finally, our SIG's very own projects are bearing fruit.

_Der Aufbau_ was New York's German-language Jewish weekly newspaper >from
1934 until 2002. In this case, New York's outer boroughs extended to
Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires and Los Angeles. Marriage, anniversary and
death announcements included both current and former (i.e., German)
towns. An "Eingetroffen" column in each week's paper reported on moves
to New York, and there were several "searching for" lists, some provided
by Jewish rescue agencies.

Working with Harry Katzman, Alex Calzareth has led the effort to index
these many entries, some of which are truly moving to read even for
readers who have no connections to the families and persons mentioned.
http://calzareth.com/aufbau/ will take you to the Heights and all the
other neighborhoods where our folks settled in the Western hemisphere.
At this moment, all entries >from the 1940s have been indexed, and there
are plenty >from other times as well.

Finally, the Name Adoption List inDEX (NALDEX) is ripe for the searching
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Germany/Naldex.htm. Here you can
find the names of over 16,000 heads of household, almost all >from
Prussia, who, in the course of emancipation, became citizens with most
if not all the rights of their Gentile neighbors in the period
1790-1860. Currently the only non-Prussian area covered by Phase 1 of
the project is Lippe-Detmold, which reported 256 households. Some of
the lists provide little more than place-name and old and new names of
the head of household; others list spouses, children, the head of
household's occupation and more.

The response to NALDEX has been wonderful. At some point, everyone who
has commented on it has used the word "more." There certainly is
more--not least a published Prussian list >from 1846 that nobody knew
about until Logan Kleinwaks stumbled upon it a few days ago. It will
become part of NALDEX soon; meanwhile we'll be looking to see whether
there are more like it hiding in similar plain sight. We'll be
reporting the project status regularly, I hope.

------------------------------------------

Thanks to all who made this conference unforgettable. Also, thanks to
the GerSIGgers who showed up, pitched in, hosted, helped out and
otherwise made everyone feel at home--even those of us who _were_ at home.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of Lwow #galicia

Norbert Weinberg <norofra@...>
 

I have been queried by Dorit Morag, who has a Facebook group,
"Irgun Yotsei Lwow V' hasviva" (Organization of Lwow Origin Jews),
on her great grandfather, Rabbi Yehoshua Preminger Hakohen of
Lwow. I found one reference to him as author of an introduction
to "Sefer Maaseh Gevurot Hashem", Lwow, 1916, by Saul Mander. If
anyone has information leads, please let me know and I will
forward it to her.

Thank you,

Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@...
http://karmisheli.blogspot.com

Researching Family Records of
WEINBERG (Dolyna/Ukraine, Vienna/Austria, Frankfurt AM, Germany)
ZARWANITZER (Dolyna/Ukraine)
IGER (Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine)
GOTTDENKER (Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine)


names #poland

Shirley Portnoy <sportnoy48@...>
 

I apologize for the length of this inquiry, but all the items stem >from the
same family.

1. Does anyone know what kind of name Eige is? Does it derive >from another
Hebrew/Yiddish name?

2. My great-grandfather's marriage record on JRI-Poland lists him as Mordko
from Zwanitz, and the last name as Pidnaczyk v Amcies. Am I correct in
assuming that Pidnaczyk was his mother's maiden name? What does the "v"
mean?

When I did a search for Pidnaczyk in the surrounding towns, I didn't come
across the same name at all. There were all kinds of approximations and
also the substitution of "b" for "p". Where might this name originate? How
would I be able to track it?

3. When a husband and wife are both listed with the same last name on the
JRI-Poland records, how is it possible to tell whether the last name belongs
to the husband or the wife's family?

I know that sometimes children were listed in the official records under
their mother's maiden name. This was the case with my grandmother, Czarne,
the daughter of Szulim Szapiera and Riwke Reisie Sonenklar. For years I
couldn't find my family until I remembered the Sonenklar name, and then I
found the children listed as Sonenklar, not Szapiera.

In the Sonenklar family there is a couple, probably born in the late 1700's,
named Feibisz Dawid Sonenklar and Czarne Sonenklar. I suspect that these may
be the grandparents of the above Czarne Sonenklar, my grandmother, whose
father's last name was Szapiera. How can I determine whether Feibisz Dawid
or the elder Czarne were >from the Sonenklar family?

4. There is another listing >from the same period of a Feibisz Dawid
Sonenklar married to Babe Sonenklar. Is it possible that Babe and Czarne
are the same person? Was Babe used for women as Alter was used for men?

I'd appreciate any help on these matters.
Thank you.

Shirley Amcis Portnoy (sportnoy48@...)
Little Neck, NY

Researching : AMCIS, AMCIS, AMTZIS (and any other phonetic variations),
SONENKLAR, and SZAPIERA >from OKOPY, BORSZCZOW, CZORTKOW, ULASKOWCE,
MIELNICA, and BURDIKOWCE; REINSTEIN >from MIELNICA; PIDNACZYK >from ?

also HARKAVY, GARKAVY, GARKAWE, etc., >from GRODNO, VOLKOVISK, SKIDEL;
GABOVITCH >from SKIDEL;YEZERSKI >from VOLKOVISK; and ZERSHTEIN and RIFKIND
from GRODNO


JRI Poland #Poland names #poland

Shirley Portnoy <sportnoy48@...>
 

I apologize for the length of this inquiry, but all the items stem >from the
same family.

1. Does anyone know what kind of name Eige is? Does it derive >from another
Hebrew/Yiddish name?

2. My great-grandfather's marriage record on JRI-Poland lists him as Mordko
from Zwanitz, and the last name as Pidnaczyk v Amcies. Am I correct in
assuming that Pidnaczyk was his mother's maiden name? What does the "v"
mean?

When I did a search for Pidnaczyk in the surrounding towns, I didn't come
across the same name at all. There were all kinds of approximations and
also the substitution of "b" for "p". Where might this name originate? How
would I be able to track it?

3. When a husband and wife are both listed with the same last name on the
JRI-Poland records, how is it possible to tell whether the last name belongs
to the husband or the wife's family?

I know that sometimes children were listed in the official records under
their mother's maiden name. This was the case with my grandmother, Czarne,
the daughter of Szulim Szapiera and Riwke Reisie Sonenklar. For years I
couldn't find my family until I remembered the Sonenklar name, and then I
found the children listed as Sonenklar, not Szapiera.

In the Sonenklar family there is a couple, probably born in the late 1700's,
named Feibisz Dawid Sonenklar and Czarne Sonenklar. I suspect that these may
be the grandparents of the above Czarne Sonenklar, my grandmother, whose
father's last name was Szapiera. How can I determine whether Feibisz Dawid
or the elder Czarne were >from the Sonenklar family?

4. There is another listing >from the same period of a Feibisz Dawid
Sonenklar married to Babe Sonenklar. Is it possible that Babe and Czarne
are the same person? Was Babe used for women as Alter was used for men?

I'd appreciate any help on these matters.
Thank you.

Shirley Amcis Portnoy (sportnoy48@...)
Little Neck, NY

Researching : AMCIS, AMCIS, AMTZIS (and any other phonetic variations),
SONENKLAR, and SZAPIERA >from OKOPY, BORSZCZOW, CZORTKOW, ULASKOWCE,
MIELNICA, and BURDIKOWCE; REINSTEIN >from MIELNICA; PIDNACZYK >from ?

also HARKAVY, GARKAVY, GARKAWE, etc., >from GRODNO, VOLKOVISK, SKIDEL;
GABOVITCH >from SKIDEL;YEZERSKI >from VOLKOVISK; and ZERSHTEIN and RIFKIND
from GRODNO

187821 - 187840 of 669724