Date   

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks Re: Shamai, Shmuel or Sha-what? - headstone help needed #general

ewolfson
 

Thank you to everyone who responded. I received so many responses,
it will be difficult to thank everyone personally. The overwhelming
majority of responses indicated the Hebrew name on Sam RACHLES'
headstone is, in fact, Shamai (ben Asher Zelig). The name, while
not nearly as common as Samuel, was nevertheless in use in this
region. I have even found someone with this same given name living
in the same town of Wysokie Litovsk -- perhaps a clue to a connection
further back. It turns out there was also a Gaon Rabbi Shamai, head
of the Rabbinical Court in Wysokie Litovsk, who was probably born
around the 1830s. If anyone has ever done any given name distribution
studies of the Grodno Gubernia area, I would be curious to know just
how rare this name is.

One response also referenced the fact that in Yiddish the name could
have been pronounced Shama which would explain the "Schame" name for
Sam Rachles on his immigration manifest. Knowing the actual name of
Sam may be of some assistance if I uncover any records without
surnames, and in looking for naming patterns in other families.

Best,

Evan W. Wolfson
Pittsburgh, PA


Thanks Re: Shamai, Shmuel or Sha-what? - headstone help needed #general

ewolfson
 

Thank you to everyone who responded. I received so many responses,
it will be difficult to thank everyone personally. The overwhelming
majority of responses indicated the Hebrew name on Sam RACHLES'
headstone is, in fact, Shamai (ben Asher Zelig). The name, while
not nearly as common as Samuel, was nevertheless in use in this
region. I have even found someone with this same given name living
in the same town of Wysokie Litovsk -- perhaps a clue to a connection
further back. It turns out there was also a Gaon Rabbi Shamai, head
of the Rabbinical Court in Wysokie Litovsk, who was probably born
around the 1830s. If anyone has ever done any given name distribution
studies of the Grodno Gubernia area, I would be curious to know just
how rare this name is.

One response also referenced the fact that in Yiddish the name could
have been pronounced Shama which would explain the "Schame" name for
Sam Rachles on his immigration manifest. Knowing the actual name of
Sam may be of some assistance if I uncover any records without
surnames, and in looking for naming patterns in other families.

Best,

Evan W. Wolfson
Pittsburgh, PA


Exhibition at Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale & A Slide Talk at New York Jewish Genealogical Society #bessarabia

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

I write to invite the community of Jewish Genealogy (and friends) to my traveling exhibition, No One
Remembers Alone: Memory, Migration, and the Making of an American Family, which opened at Yale
University's Slifka Center for Jewish Life on October 30th and runs until February 1, 2015.

The show recreates the migration narrative of an entire family of Russian Jews using oral history, photo
postcards, penny postcards, letters, passports, ship manifests, diaries, maps, and charts. Many of you
have helped me translate and interpret family memorabilia over the years. The family were eventually
spread across three continents: Europe, North, and South America. Visitors will learn about the
historical context for the mass migration of Russian Jews in this period; the forces for and against open
immigration to the US that influenced individual family members' choices; and the situation for Russian
Jews and their American families during World War I and World War II. Visitors are invited to place a
numbered pin on a map of the Pale of Settlement and fill out a card with the family and town of origin
names, and any stories they'd like to add. The annotated map will be digitized and put online over the
winter.

The Slifka Center is free and open to the public, with long hours. For information, see their web site:
http://slifkacenter.org. I would be happy to host any genealogical group that wishes to have a guided
tour.

In addition: next Sunday, November 23rd at 2 pm, I will be giving a slide talk for the New York Jewish
Genealogical Association at the Center for Jewish History. Drawing on specific examples >from the
exhibition, I will talk about how I gathered the vast trove of memorabilia, got it translated and
interpreted, put it in historical context, and then painstakingly figured out how to organize it into a
narrative. Larger themes include: technology and immigration history; kinds of memory; how to read
a postcard; and the relationship between memory and history, using Yizkor books and first hand reports
from Joint Distribution Committee relief workers in Eastern Europe.
The Center for Jewish History is at 15 West 16th St.
The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open for research at 11:00 AM on the day
of my talk.

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related
names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of
Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay,
becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Exhibition at Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale & A Slide Talk at New York Jewish Genealogical Society #bessarabia

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

I write to invite the community of Jewish Genealogy (and friends) to my traveling exhibition, No One
Remembers Alone: Memory, Migration, and the Making of an American Family, which opened at Yale
University's Slifka Center for Jewish Life on October 30th and runs until February 1, 2015.

The show recreates the migration narrative of an entire family of Russian Jews using oral history, photo
postcards, penny postcards, letters, passports, ship manifests, diaries, maps, and charts. Many of you
have helped me translate and interpret family memorabilia over the years. The family were eventually
spread across three continents: Europe, North, and South America. Visitors will learn about the
historical context for the mass migration of Russian Jews in this period; the forces for and against open
immigration to the US that influenced individual family members' choices; and the situation for Russian
Jews and their American families during World War I and World War II. Visitors are invited to place a
numbered pin on a map of the Pale of Settlement and fill out a card with the family and town of origin
names, and any stories they'd like to add. The annotated map will be digitized and put online over the
winter.

The Slifka Center is free and open to the public, with long hours. For information, see their web site:
http://slifkacenter.org. I would be happy to host any genealogical group that wishes to have a guided
tour.

In addition: next Sunday, November 23rd at 2 pm, I will be giving a slide talk for the New York Jewish
Genealogical Association at the Center for Jewish History. Drawing on specific examples >from the
exhibition, I will talk about how I gathered the vast trove of memorabilia, got it translated and
interpreted, put it in historical context, and then painstakingly figured out how to organize it into a
narrative. Larger themes include: technology and immigration history; kinds of memory; how to read
a postcard; and the relationship between memory and history, using Yizkor books and first hand reports
from Joint Distribution Committee relief workers in Eastern Europe.
The Center for Jewish History is at 15 West 16th St.
The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open for research at 11:00 AM on the day
of my talk.

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related
names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of
Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN
of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay,
becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


German SIG #Germany Re: GerSIG Presence at 2015 IAJGS Jerusalem Conference - Your advice and help are requested. #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSIG Members

Your Directors are now planning the GerSIG presence at the 2015 IAJGS
Conference, to take place in Jerusalem.

I am interested in hearing >from you as follows:

1. Has your research made you aware of someone based in Israel who
has special expertise or knowledge of using specialist resources in
Israel for German Jewish research.

2. Has your research made you aware of someones based elsewhere (not
in Israel) who has special expertise or knowledge of using specialist
resources in Israel for German Jewish research.

3. Are you a GerSIG member who is going to be attending the
conference and who may be able to help GerSIG with organising some
aspects of our presence in Israel next summer, (not all the GerSIG
Directors are able to attend our Conference next summer and we are
going to need some help.)

Please contact me off list.

Kind regards,

GerSIG Director Jeanette Rosenberg in London UK
Jeanette.R.Rosenberg@...


Re: GerSIG Presence at 2015 IAJGS Jerusalem Conference - Your advice and help are requested. #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSIG Members

Your Directors are now planning the GerSIG presence at the 2015 IAJGS
Conference, to take place in Jerusalem.

I am interested in hearing >from you as follows:

1. Has your research made you aware of someone based in Israel who
has special expertise or knowledge of using specialist resources in
Israel for German Jewish research.

2. Has your research made you aware of someones based elsewhere (not
in Israel) who has special expertise or knowledge of using specialist
resources in Israel for German Jewish research.

3. Are you a GerSIG member who is going to be attending the
conference and who may be able to help GerSIG with organising some
aspects of our presence in Israel next summer, (not all the GerSIG
Directors are able to attend our Conference next summer and we are
going to need some help.)

Please contact me off list.

Kind regards,

GerSIG Director Jeanette Rosenberg in London UK
Jeanette.R.Rosenberg@...


German SIG #Germany Re: Using the Central Archives of the Jewish People in Jerusalem #germany

Renate Rosenau <RenateRosenau@...>
 

On Friday, 14 November, 2014, Nicholas Landau <nicklandau@...>
wrote aboujt getting information >from the Central Archives for the
History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem.

I visited the CAHJP Jerusalem in April last year, but my experiences were
different and good. In 2007 the CAHJP had moved to the Giv'at Ram Campus of
the Hebrew University.

from my home I was able to search their holdings on their website -
https://cahjp.huji.ac.il/ and prepare my visit. Yes, it is a small place,
therefore it is good to announce your visit as requested on their website.
But during two days I was able to find a lot of documents I was looking for,
with the assistance of the staff >from all over the world.

Renate Rosenau, Alzey, Germany RenateRosenau@...


Re: Using the Central Archives of the Jewish People in Jerusalem #germany

Renate Rosenau <RenateRosenau@...>
 

On Friday, 14 November, 2014, Nicholas Landau <nicklandau@...>
wrote aboujt getting information >from the Central Archives for the
History of the Jewish People in Jerusalem.

I visited the CAHJP Jerusalem in April last year, but my experiences were
different and good. In 2007 the CAHJP had moved to the Giv'at Ram Campus of
the Hebrew University.

from my home I was able to search their holdings on their website -
https://cahjp.huji.ac.il/ and prepare my visit. Yes, it is a small place,
therefore it is good to announce your visit as requested on their website.
But during two days I was able to find a lot of documents I was looking for,
with the assistance of the staff >from all over the world.

Renate Rosenau, Alzey, Germany RenateRosenau@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Exhibition at Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale & A Slide Talk at New York Jewish Genealogical Society #ukraine

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

I write to invite the community of Jewish Genealogy (and friends) to my traveling exhibition, No One Remembers Alone: Memory, Migration, and the Making of an American Family, which opened at Yale University's Slifka Center for Jewish Life on October 30th and runs until February 1, 2015.

The show recreates the migration narrative of an entire family of Russian Jews using oral history, photo postcards, penny postcards, letters, passports, ship manifests, diaries, maps, and charts. Many of you have helped me translate and interpret family memorabilia over the years. The family were eventually spread across three continents: Europe, North, and South America. Visitors will learn about the historical context for the mass migration of Russian Jews in this period; the forces for and against open immigration to the US that influenced individual family members' choices; and the situation for Russian Jews and their American families during World War I and World War II. Visitors are invited to place a numbered pin on a map of the Pale of Settlement and fill out a card with the family and town of origin names, and any stories they?d like to add. The annotated map will be digitized and put online over the winter.

The Slifka Center is free and open to the public, with long hours. For information, see their web site: http://slifkacenter.org. I would be happy to host any genealogical group that wishes to have a guided tour.

In addition: next Sunday, November 23rd at 2 pm, I will be giving a slide talk for the New York Jewish Genealogical Association at the Center for Jewish History. Drawing on specific examples >from the exhibition, I will talk about how I gathered the vast trove of memorabilia, got it translated and interpreted, put it in historical context, and then painstakingly figured out how to organize it into a narrative. Larger themes include: technology and immigration history; kinds of memory; how to read a postcard; and the relationship between memory and history, using Yizkor books and first hand reports >from Joint Distribution Committee relief workers in Eastern Europe.

The Center for Jewish History is at 15 West 16th St.
The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open for research at 11:00 AM on the day of my talk.

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Exhibition at Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale & A Slide Talk at New York Jewish Genealogical Society #ukraine

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

I write to invite the community of Jewish Genealogy (and friends) to my traveling exhibition, No One Remembers Alone: Memory, Migration, and the Making of an American Family, which opened at Yale University's Slifka Center for Jewish Life on October 30th and runs until February 1, 2015.

The show recreates the migration narrative of an entire family of Russian Jews using oral history, photo postcards, penny postcards, letters, passports, ship manifests, diaries, maps, and charts. Many of you have helped me translate and interpret family memorabilia over the years. The family were eventually spread across three continents: Europe, North, and South America. Visitors will learn about the historical context for the mass migration of Russian Jews in this period; the forces for and against open immigration to the US that influenced individual family members' choices; and the situation for Russian Jews and their American families during World War I and World War II. Visitors are invited to place a numbered pin on a map of the Pale of Settlement and fill out a card with the family and town of origin names, and any stories they?d like to add. The annotated map will be digitized and put online over the winter.

The Slifka Center is free and open to the public, with long hours. For information, see their web site: http://slifkacenter.org. I would be happy to host any genealogical group that wishes to have a guided tour.

In addition: next Sunday, November 23rd at 2 pm, I will be giving a slide talk for the New York Jewish Genealogical Association at the Center for Jewish History. Drawing on specific examples >from the exhibition, I will talk about how I gathered the vast trove of memorabilia, got it translated and interpreted, put it in historical context, and then painstakingly figured out how to organize it into a narrative. Larger themes include: technology and immigration history; kinds of memory; how to read a postcard; and the relationship between memory and history, using Yizkor books and first hand reports >from Joint Distribution Committee relief workers in Eastern Europe.

The Center for Jewish History is at 15 West 16th St.
The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open for research at 11:00 AM on the day of my talk.

Thank you,

Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic POZARIK in Phoenix, AZ #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family POZARIK in Phoenix but I am
unsure of the exact name. He was a doctor - Dr. Marvin Pozarik who
married Adrienne Levinthal

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


POZARIK in Phoenix, AZ #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family POZARIK in Phoenix but I am
unsure of the exact name. He was a doctor - Dr. Marvin Pozarik who
married Adrienne Levinthal

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching family from Wlocklawek #general

sarafreedman@...
 

I have become stuck in researching my family, as we have no known
surname. I know that my great grandfather was Eliezer HACOHEN, born
approx 1830, lived in Wlocklawek, was a Rabbi, and drowned around
1860. His wife, Annie, was pregnant at the time, the child was called
Eliezer ben Eliezer. She carried on his rabbinical functions,
answering sheilas, remarried and had 4 (?) more children. Around 1905,
she and Eliezer left Poland for London, England, and changed the
surname to Freedman. She probably remarried to someone named Yehuda
Shaiak. If anyone can help me find out more, given no surname, I
would be very grateful.
Thank you

Sara Freedman
Jerusalem


Searching family from Wlocklawek #general

sarafreedman@...
 

I have become stuck in researching my family, as we have no known
surname. I know that my great grandfather was Eliezer HACOHEN, born
approx 1830, lived in Wlocklawek, was a Rabbi, and drowned around
1860. His wife, Annie, was pregnant at the time, the child was called
Eliezer ben Eliezer. She carried on his rabbinical functions,
answering sheilas, remarried and had 4 (?) more children. Around 1905,
she and Eliezer left Poland for London, England, and changed the
surname to Freedman. She probably remarried to someone named Yehuda
Shaiak. If anyone can help me find out more, given no surname, I
would be very grateful.
Thank you

Sara Freedman
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Shamai, Shmuel or Sha-what? - headstone help needed #general

E Snyder <essnydere@...>
 

Its quite clear that the name is Shammai. The name Samuel was apparently
chosen to sound more like an English language name whereas Shammai doesn't.
E.Snyder
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Evan Wolfson <ewolfson@...>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 17:03:05 +0000 (UTC)

I am looking for assistance with understanding a given name on a
headstone. The name is the Hebrew name for a "Samuel" RACHLES of
Passaic, NJ. He was born around 1867 in Wisoko Litovsk (Vysokoye)
near Brest, and died in 1945. Most of his children and his own
headstone gives his name as Shin-Mem-Aleph-Yod, which to me would
read Shamai assuming this was not some kind of abbreviation or
nickname (less likely it is "Sammy" in the Hebrew). We had
presumed that his Hebrew name was Samuel.
...


Re: Shamai, Shmuel or Sha-what? - headstone help needed #general

E Snyder <essnydere@...>
 

Its quite clear that the name is Shammai. The name Samuel was apparently
chosen to sound more like an English language name whereas Shammai doesn't.
E.Snyder
Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Evan Wolfson <ewolfson@...>
Date: Sat, 15 Nov 2014 17:03:05 +0000 (UTC)

I am looking for assistance with understanding a given name on a
headstone. The name is the Hebrew name for a "Samuel" RACHLES of
Passaic, NJ. He was born around 1867 in Wisoko Litovsk (Vysokoye)
near Brest, and died in 1945. Most of his children and his own
headstone gives his name as Shin-Mem-Aleph-Yod, which to me would
read Shamai assuming this was not some kind of abbreviation or
nickname (less likely it is "Sammy" in the Hebrew). We had
presumed that his Hebrew name was Samuel.
...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen POZARIK in Phoenix, AZ #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family POZARIK in Phoenix but I am
unsure of the exact name. He was a doctor - Dr. Marvin Pozarik who
married Adrienne Levinthal

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


POZARIK in Phoenix, AZ #general

Neil@...
 

Looking to make contact with the family POZARIK in Phoenix but I am
unsure of the exact name. He was a doctor - Dr. Marvin Pozarik who
married Adrienne Levinthal

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send contact information privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: (Belarus) Brest Town Built Out of Jewish Tombstones #general

Joseph Hirschfield
 

Multi-layer burial plots at the ancient Prague cemetery resulted
from the refusal of the municipal authorities to permit the Jewish
cemetery to expand to accommodate new burials. Halakhic law
requires that Jews must not destroy Jewish graves or remove the
tombstones. This meant that when the cemetery ran out of space
more layers of soil were placed on the existing graves and the
old tombstones taken out and placed upon the new layer of soil.
This resulted in the cemetery eventually having up to 12 layers of
graves in some areas.

Joe Hirschfield
Portage, MI
HIRSCHFELD, HERSZFELD, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM, LINDENBAUM-Skwarzawa,
Gliniany, Sielec Bienkow, Jaryczow Nowy-Galicia
MINOFF, MINOWITZKI, MINOWICKI-Brest Litovsk, Vysoka Litovsk-Belarus

---
Some historical neglect or theft of Jewish tombstones is based on
ignorance rather than anything -- but what exactly *is* the Jewish
law on this subject? After all, famous cemeteries such as the one in
Josefov in Prague have new layers upon new layers, and wasn't there
a big movement of graves towards the end of "Once Upon Time in
America"?

Todd Edelman, near Los Angeles


Re: (Belarus) Brest Town Built Out of Jewish Tombstones #belarus

Joseph Hirschfield
 

Multi-layer burial plots at the ancient Prague cemetery resulted
from the refusal of the municipal authorities to permit the Jewish
cemetery to expand to accommodate new burials. Halakhic law
requires that Jews must not destroy Jewish graves or remove the
tombstones. This meant that when the cemetery ran out of space
more layers of soil were placed on the existing graves and the
old tombstones taken out and placed upon the new layer of soil.
This resulted in the cemetery eventually having up to 12 layers of
graves in some areas.

Joe Hirschfield
Portage, MI
HIRSCHFELD, HERSZFELD, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM, LINDENBAUM-Skwarzawa,
Gliniany, Sielec Bienkow, Jaryczow Nowy-Galicia
MINOFF, MINOWITZKI, MINOWICKI-Brest Litovsk, Vysoka Litovsk-Belarus

---
Some historical neglect or theft of Jewish tombstones is based on
ignorance rather than anything -- but what exactly *is* the Jewish
law on this subject? After all, famous cemeteries such as the one in
Josefov in Prague have new layers upon new layers, and wasn't there
a big movement of graves towards the end of "Once Upon Time in
America"?

Todd Edelman, near Los Angeles

116101 - 116120 of 673445