Date   

New Vilnius Internal Passport Files Translated #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Some of you may be aware that Howard Margol has been ill. He has stepped
down as Coordinator of the LitvakSIG Internal Passport Project, which he
founded in 2007 after discovering these very valuable documents on a trip
to Lithuania.

I will be overseeing the completion of the translations of the Vilnius
Passports. Please direct any questions to me at <esjoachim@...>.

New Internal Passport files for the city of Vilnius have been added to the
Vilnius IP Shutterfly website,
<https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com>.

The files include 4,948 new records. If you are already a Qualified
Contributor to the Vilnius IP project, you may view the data by logging
into the website.

If you are not a Qualified Contributor to the Vilnius IP Project, you may do
so by contributing $100 to LitvakSIG. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and
choose Internal Passports under Special Projects.

This new data will become available in the All Lithuania Database 18 months
from now. At the same time, it becomes available in the JewishGen Lithuania
Database.

Thank you,

Eden Joachim
Records Acquisitions and Translations Committee
Internal Passport Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania New Vilnius Internal Passport Files Translated #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

Some of you may be aware that Howard Margol has been ill. He has stepped
down as Coordinator of the LitvakSIG Internal Passport Project, which he
founded in 2007 after discovering these very valuable documents on a trip
to Lithuania.

I will be overseeing the completion of the translations of the Vilnius
Passports. Please direct any questions to me at <esjoachim@...>.

New Internal Passport files for the city of Vilnius have been added to the
Vilnius IP Shutterfly website,
<https://vilniusinternalpassports19191940.shutterfly.com>.

The files include 4,948 new records. If you are already a Qualified
Contributor to the Vilnius IP project, you may view the data by logging
into the website.

If you are not a Qualified Contributor to the Vilnius IP Project, you may do
so by contributing $100 to LitvakSIG. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute and
choose Internal Passports under Special Projects.

This new data will become available in the All Lithuania Database 18 months
from now. At the same time, it becomes available in the JewishGen Lithuania
Database.

Thank you,

Eden Joachim
Records Acquisitions and Translations Committee
Internal Passport Project


Re: Germany, Hesse, Civil Registration, since 1874 #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Thank you, Gerhard, for simplifying the matter. There are indeed several
ways to access the Hessian Archives' vital-records holdings.

One small detail, though: The Standesamt system did indeed begin on
October 1, 1874--but only in Prussia. The Hessian State Archives'
on-line collection begins on January 1, 1876, the day that all of
Germany went over to the new system. At that time, Prussia included the
state of Hessen-Nassau, but not the rest of today's Hessen. So where are
the Hessen-Nassau books for the first 15 months?

Why, at FamilySearch.org, of course! The originals are or were in the
Hessian State Archive in Marburg, where LDS filmed the collection of
miscellaneous vital records. That collection is now on line as "Germany,
Hesse-Nassau, Civil Registers and Church Books, 1701-1875." In reality,
it covers only the Kassel district of Hessen-Nassau.

As I mentioned a few posts ago, this collection is almost impossible to
use on line. The localities (over 500 of them) are listed
alphabetically, with few indications as to the county, etc. In Hessen
this can be vexing, given the number of places with non-unique names.
Note that the 1876ff. records are grouped by county (Kreis). In 4 cases,
a town and its records appear twice. A few town names are spelled wrong.

Within a locality, the records are grouped by author. Alas, this was
done inconsistently and often just plain wrong. Most of the 120
localities that have 1874-5 records have them listed under
"Standesamt"--but others are under "Buergermeisterei" or "Amtsgericht".
In one case, a book of birth records >from Huenfeld is cataloged under Fulda.

The 1874-5 Standesamt records are one of four main sets of records in
this collection. The other two are: civil vital records >from the era of
the Kingdom of Westphalia (c.1808-13); marriage contracts and annexes,
some going back even before 1701; and miscellaneous Jewish records,
mostly >from 1825-1874.

The Kingdom of Westphalia records are wonderful in their Napoleonic
detail, and in that they treat Jews like everyone else. In most places,
each denomination had its own registers, but the reporting was done the
same way for all. I have made great headway in researching my own family
by using these. Unfortunately, they are listed under any number of
different headings: Standesamt, Buergermeisterei, Justizamt,
Amtsgericht, and the various religious denominations. In some cases,
Jewish records are bound together with others without mention of them
being made; in others, purely Jewish records are listed as "Evangelisch."

The 1825-1874 Jewish (and "dissident") records, too, appear under many
different authorships: Polizeiamt, Buergermeisterei, Standesamt,
Juedische Gemeinde. Many of the descriptions (date, type of record) are
inaccurate, sometimes seriously understating the contents.

For those of us who worked on the Hessen Gatermann project, Phase 1, the
1825-1874 records are important in that they contain quite a few vital
registers that the Nazis missed! Especially in Schluechtern and
Ziegenhain counties (Kreise), there are many "other shoes" waiting to
drop. >from Schluechtern we have records for Mittelsinn, Heubach,
Hintersteinau, Salmünster, Sterbfritz, Vollmerz and Züntersbach; >from
Ziegenhain: Großropperhausen, Neukirchen, Röllshausen, Schrecksbach and
Ziegenhain itself. Rueckingen (Kr. Hanau), Eiterfeld (Kr. Huenfeld), and
Erksdorf and Schiffelsbach (Kr. Marburg) are also represented.

Finally, one should remember that the vast majority of Hessian and
Nassovian church books >from the 18th and 19th centuries are not included
here at all. They may be found in various diocesan and other archives in
Kassel, Fulda and elsewhere.

I have struggled in vain for over 2 years to bring these problems to the
attention (or rather, interest) of familysearch.org. The collection
would benefit greatly >from being broken up into a few sections, each of
which with a title that described its contents accurately and
succinctly; and >from being recataloged in a consistent manner.

By the way, there are no *intentional* restrictions on the use of this
collection...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/23/2015 3:20 PM, Gerhard Buck buckidstein@... wrote:
The confusion about how to find access to the Civil Vital Registers of
Hessen can easily be abolished. These Standesamtsregister begin in
1874, are still in use and belong to the Federal State of Hessen. The
older copies, which are no longer subject to privacy laws, have been
transferred to a new central archive since 2011. It is part of the
State Archive of Marburg. At the beginning, shelves with a length of
1,500 meters were needed.

To make the documents accessible to the public in the easiest possible
way, the State of Hessen has come to an agreement with FamilySearch.
This institution digitizes the whole and steadily growing collection
in the new archive. Two identical copies are in the course of being
published.

One copy is given to the State that publishes all of them on the joint
website of its archives. Until February 2015 its name was HADIS; since
then it is called Arcinsys. This website https://arcinsys.hessen.de is
accessible to everybody without any restrictions. There are two ways
to find the desired localities.

One was already mentioned by Roger Lustig. You first go to another
website with historical information about Hessen: LAGIS. With the
(English!) link http://www.lagis-hessen.de/en/subjects/index/sn/pstr
you are lead to the search function. The advantage of this indirect
way via LAGIS: you get an excellent survey of all the available places
and years to which you get with the next step.

The direct way is:
https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/detailAction.action?detailid=v282839
Here you find the register for all places.

Another copy of the digital images becomes the property of
FamilySearch. They have their own, less favorable rules concerning the
access which is influenced by the fact that this firm plans to index
all the entries.


German SIG #Germany Re: Germany, Hesse, Civil Registration, since 1874 #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Thank you, Gerhard, for simplifying the matter. There are indeed several
ways to access the Hessian Archives' vital-records holdings.

One small detail, though: The Standesamt system did indeed begin on
October 1, 1874--but only in Prussia. The Hessian State Archives'
on-line collection begins on January 1, 1876, the day that all of
Germany went over to the new system. At that time, Prussia included the
state of Hessen-Nassau, but not the rest of today's Hessen. So where are
the Hessen-Nassau books for the first 15 months?

Why, at FamilySearch.org, of course! The originals are or were in the
Hessian State Archive in Marburg, where LDS filmed the collection of
miscellaneous vital records. That collection is now on line as "Germany,
Hesse-Nassau, Civil Registers and Church Books, 1701-1875." In reality,
it covers only the Kassel district of Hessen-Nassau.

As I mentioned a few posts ago, this collection is almost impossible to
use on line. The localities (over 500 of them) are listed
alphabetically, with few indications as to the county, etc. In Hessen
this can be vexing, given the number of places with non-unique names.
Note that the 1876ff. records are grouped by county (Kreis). In 4 cases,
a town and its records appear twice. A few town names are spelled wrong.

Within a locality, the records are grouped by author. Alas, this was
done inconsistently and often just plain wrong. Most of the 120
localities that have 1874-5 records have them listed under
"Standesamt"--but others are under "Buergermeisterei" or "Amtsgericht".
In one case, a book of birth records >from Huenfeld is cataloged under Fulda.

The 1874-5 Standesamt records are one of four main sets of records in
this collection. The other two are: civil vital records >from the era of
the Kingdom of Westphalia (c.1808-13); marriage contracts and annexes,
some going back even before 1701; and miscellaneous Jewish records,
mostly >from 1825-1874.

The Kingdom of Westphalia records are wonderful in their Napoleonic
detail, and in that they treat Jews like everyone else. In most places,
each denomination had its own registers, but the reporting was done the
same way for all. I have made great headway in researching my own family
by using these. Unfortunately, they are listed under any number of
different headings: Standesamt, Buergermeisterei, Justizamt,
Amtsgericht, and the various religious denominations. In some cases,
Jewish records are bound together with others without mention of them
being made; in others, purely Jewish records are listed as "Evangelisch."

The 1825-1874 Jewish (and "dissident") records, too, appear under many
different authorships: Polizeiamt, Buergermeisterei, Standesamt,
Juedische Gemeinde. Many of the descriptions (date, type of record) are
inaccurate, sometimes seriously understating the contents.

For those of us who worked on the Hessen Gatermann project, Phase 1, the
1825-1874 records are important in that they contain quite a few vital
registers that the Nazis missed! Especially in Schluechtern and
Ziegenhain counties (Kreise), there are many "other shoes" waiting to
drop. >from Schluechtern we have records for Mittelsinn, Heubach,
Hintersteinau, Salmünster, Sterbfritz, Vollmerz and Züntersbach; >from
Ziegenhain: Großropperhausen, Neukirchen, Röllshausen, Schrecksbach and
Ziegenhain itself. Rueckingen (Kr. Hanau), Eiterfeld (Kr. Huenfeld), and
Erksdorf and Schiffelsbach (Kr. Marburg) are also represented.

Finally, one should remember that the vast majority of Hessian and
Nassovian church books >from the 18th and 19th centuries are not included
here at all. They may be found in various diocesan and other archives in
Kassel, Fulda and elsewhere.

I have struggled in vain for over 2 years to bring these problems to the
attention (or rather, interest) of familysearch.org. The collection
would benefit greatly >from being broken up into a few sections, each of
which with a title that described its contents accurately and
succinctly; and >from being recataloged in a consistent manner.

By the way, there are no *intentional* restrictions on the use of this
collection...

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/23/2015 3:20 PM, Gerhard Buck buckidstein@... wrote:
The confusion about how to find access to the Civil Vital Registers of
Hessen can easily be abolished. These Standesamtsregister begin in
1874, are still in use and belong to the Federal State of Hessen. The
older copies, which are no longer subject to privacy laws, have been
transferred to a new central archive since 2011. It is part of the
State Archive of Marburg. At the beginning, shelves with a length of
1,500 meters were needed.

To make the documents accessible to the public in the easiest possible
way, the State of Hessen has come to an agreement with FamilySearch.
This institution digitizes the whole and steadily growing collection
in the new archive. Two identical copies are in the course of being
published.

One copy is given to the State that publishes all of them on the joint
website of its archives. Until February 2015 its name was HADIS; since
then it is called Arcinsys. This website https://arcinsys.hessen.de is
accessible to everybody without any restrictions. There are two ways
to find the desired localities.

One was already mentioned by Roger Lustig. You first go to another
website with historical information about Hessen: LAGIS. With the
(English!) link http://www.lagis-hessen.de/en/subjects/index/sn/pstr
you are lead to the search function. The advantage of this indirect
way via LAGIS: you get an excellent survey of all the available places
and years to which you get with the next step.

The direct way is:
https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/detailAction.action?detailid=v282839
Here you find the register for all places.

Another copy of the digital images becomes the property of
FamilySearch. They have their own, less favorable rules concerning the
access which is influenced by the fact that this firm plans to index
all the entries.


Re: Unusual WWI Postcard #germany

naomi rosenthal <naomiro999@...>
 

My grandfather was a German soldier in WWI, and I have many military
postcards (with the inscription Feldpostkarte) >from that time, as well
as postcards written before the war by my grandfather in Hamburg to my
grandmother in Frankfurt >from 1898 until they married in 1906. >from these
I can tell you the following:

1) Postcards in Germany during that time had stamps >from both sending and
receiving towns.
2) Besides the dates, the stamps had other numbers on them, and my guess is
that these referred to the stamping post offices.

3) Military Feldpostkarten did not usually have postage stamps but were
only stamped, also when sent to civilians. I'm guessing this was more
convenient than carrying delicate postage stamps in the field.

There were many, many, war wounded, and there were probably not enough
military hospitals to accommodate them all, so they might also have been
placed in regular hospitals. The notice on the wall referring to the
care of war wounded would not have been necessary if the entire hospital
was for the military. Also, the photo shows a notice on the wall with
a cross on it, so I doubt it was a Jewish hospital.

Can't help with the old script. If you don't get help here,
the Suetterlinstube in Hamburg will transcribe.

Naomi M Rosenthal Berkeley, CA, US naomiro999@...
Author of Lina's Love (pre-WWI German postcards) and Searching for
Hugo (WWI German correspondence)

Jeffrey Knisbacher <j2456@...> wrote:
Subject: Unusual WWI Postcard >from Berlin to Linz, Austria on Viewmate
--help requested in reading the German and overall analysis

Actually, my first question is whether this card really is unusual?
Do any of you researchers have anything similar or have you seen
anything similar? <snip>
Here are the three URLs to see the three different views of the card:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41804
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41805
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41806


German SIG #Germany Re: Unusual WWI Postcard #germany

naomi rosenthal <naomiro999@...>
 

My grandfather was a German soldier in WWI, and I have many military
postcards (with the inscription Feldpostkarte) >from that time, as well
as postcards written before the war by my grandfather in Hamburg to my
grandmother in Frankfurt >from 1898 until they married in 1906. >from these
I can tell you the following:

1) Postcards in Germany during that time had stamps >from both sending and
receiving towns.
2) Besides the dates, the stamps had other numbers on them, and my guess is
that these referred to the stamping post offices.

3) Military Feldpostkarten did not usually have postage stamps but were
only stamped, also when sent to civilians. I'm guessing this was more
convenient than carrying delicate postage stamps in the field.

There were many, many, war wounded, and there were probably not enough
military hospitals to accommodate them all, so they might also have been
placed in regular hospitals. The notice on the wall referring to the
care of war wounded would not have been necessary if the entire hospital
was for the military. Also, the photo shows a notice on the wall with
a cross on it, so I doubt it was a Jewish hospital.

Can't help with the old script. If you don't get help here,
the Suetterlinstube in Hamburg will transcribe.

Naomi M Rosenthal Berkeley, CA, US naomiro999@...
Author of Lina's Love (pre-WWI German postcards) and Searching for
Hugo (WWI German correspondence)

Jeffrey Knisbacher <j2456@...> wrote:
Subject: Unusual WWI Postcard >from Berlin to Linz, Austria on Viewmate
--help requested in reading the German and overall analysis

Actually, my first question is whether this card really is unusual?
Do any of you researchers have anything similar or have you seen
anything similar? <snip>
Here are the three URLs to see the three different views of the card:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41804
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41805
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM41806


Help with Details of an 1882 Romanian Marriage Certificate from Suceava #romania

Graeme Boocock
 

Hello. I would like to ask if someone can help me in understanding the
fine details of the Romanian marriage record linked below:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=41874

The marriage certificate is for Markus ABRAMOWITZ (here rendered
Marcus AVRAMOVICI), 1858-1930; and Fanny SONNENFELD (here rendered
Fani), 1859-1938. The precise words used to describe the two families
are different, which leads me to believe that different information is
provided. Based on my limited understanding, I think it says the
following.

Marcus Abvramovici
born in Botosani (Romania)
living in Iasi, son of
(?) Avram Avramovici
and Sure born Falicenier
27 years [of age]
(?)

Fani (?) Feige Sonnenfeld
born in Suceava, daughter of
(?) Uscher and
Sima Sonnenfeld
of Suceava
26 [years of age]
(?)

My main question is about the Avramovici family. Where it reads "Sure
nasc. Falicenier", is that an indication that the mother, Sure, was
*born* in Falticeni the town, or rather that her *maiden name* was
Falicenier? If the latter, is that the correct spelling? It does not
appear that the written name contains a "T" as in the town of
"Falticeni".

Whatever it says, I find it interesting that this information is
provided only for the Avramovici family, whereas for the Sonnenfleds
we are only told that they are "of Suceava". No additional details
for the mother, Sima, are provided.

Also, where "Fani" is written, is the next word telling us that she is
"also known as" "Feige, or is this an indication that her
original/birth name was Feige?

Thank you very much in advance,

Graeme Boocock

graeme.boocock@...
Ottawa, Canada


Romania SIG #Romania Help with Details of an 1882 Romanian Marriage Certificate from Suceava #romania

Graeme Boocock
 

Hello. I would like to ask if someone can help me in understanding the
fine details of the Romanian marriage record linked below:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=41874

The marriage certificate is for Markus ABRAMOWITZ (here rendered
Marcus AVRAMOVICI), 1858-1930; and Fanny SONNENFELD (here rendered
Fani), 1859-1938. The precise words used to describe the two families
are different, which leads me to believe that different information is
provided. Based on my limited understanding, I think it says the
following.

Marcus Abvramovici
born in Botosani (Romania)
living in Iasi, son of
(?) Avram Avramovici
and Sure born Falicenier
27 years [of age]
(?)

Fani (?) Feige Sonnenfeld
born in Suceava, daughter of
(?) Uscher and
Sima Sonnenfeld
of Suceava
26 [years of age]
(?)

My main question is about the Avramovici family. Where it reads "Sure
nasc. Falicenier", is that an indication that the mother, Sure, was
*born* in Falticeni the town, or rather that her *maiden name* was
Falicenier? If the latter, is that the correct spelling? It does not
appear that the written name contains a "T" as in the town of
"Falticeni".

Whatever it says, I find it interesting that this information is
provided only for the Avramovici family, whereas for the Sonnenfleds
we are only told that they are "of Suceava". No additional details
for the mother, Sima, are provided.

Also, where "Fani" is written, is the next word telling us that she is
"also known as" "Feige, or is this an indication that her
original/birth name was Feige?

Thank you very much in advance,

Graeme Boocock

graeme.boocock@...
Ottawa, Canada


Final resting place of Theresia FELDMANN #austria-czech

pheilbrunn@...
 

Hi,

I am trying to trace the last resting place of my aunt Theresia/Therese
FELDMANN born 13th December 1897 in Vienna, Austria to Wilhelm and Bertha
FELDMANN. The facts as I know them are;
She emigrated to Palestine before WW2 though the date is unknown
She was married but again I do not know whether she married in Austria
and emigrated or else met her husband in Palestine. I have searched the IKW
records in Vienna and couldn't find any marriage record.
She was living in Haifa in 1960 with her husband but had no children.
The date of her death is unknown.
I am hoping that someone can help me check the death records and or burial
records for Haifa >from 1960 to say 1985 and that these records might contain
either her maiden name of FELDMANN or that the name Theresia/Therese and her
date of birth are matched.
Any advice or help is greatly appreciated.

Regards,

Peter Heilbrunn
Amersham, England


Prostejov #austria-czech

mbeer@...
 

Dear people,
I am one of the few Prostejov Jewish citizens still alive.
I live in Tel Aviv, have visited Prostejov in the last years by myself, with
my children and grandchildren.
I have a good memory and remember still much, especially events and people
from my childhood which was so cruelly terminated.
Maud Michal Beer.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Final resting place of Theresia FELDMANN #austria-czech

pheilbrunn@...
 

Hi,

I am trying to trace the last resting place of my aunt Theresia/Therese
FELDMANN born 13th December 1897 in Vienna, Austria to Wilhelm and Bertha
FELDMANN. The facts as I know them are;
She emigrated to Palestine before WW2 though the date is unknown
She was married but again I do not know whether she married in Austria
and emigrated or else met her husband in Palestine. I have searched the IKW
records in Vienna and couldn't find any marriage record.
She was living in Haifa in 1960 with her husband but had no children.
The date of her death is unknown.
I am hoping that someone can help me check the death records and or burial
records for Haifa >from 1960 to say 1985 and that these records might contain
either her maiden name of FELDMANN or that the name Theresia/Therese and her
date of birth are matched.
Any advice or help is greatly appreciated.

Regards,

Peter Heilbrunn
Amersham, England


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Prostejov #austria-czech

mbeer@...
 

Dear people,
I am one of the few Prostejov Jewish citizens still alive.
I live in Tel Aviv, have visited Prostejov in the last years by myself, with
my children and grandchildren.
I have a good memory and remember still much, especially events and people
from my childhood which was so cruelly terminated.
Maud Michal Beer.


Re: Hesse records - [Mainz is no longer in the state (Land) Hessen] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Arline:
Mainz isn't in Hesse any more. It's the capital of Rheinland-Pfalz.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/24/2015 11:04 AM, Arline Sachs sachs@... wrote:
Maybe I don't know what I am doing. I checked the site for names for
which I already have the death record, I tried Cahn and Kahn and the year
(1884 and 1917) neither person showed up. Both died in Mainz. Maybe they
did not do the larger city yet???


German SIG #Germany Re: Hesse records - [Mainz is no longer in the state (Land) Hessen] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Arline:
Mainz isn't in Hesse any more. It's the capital of Rheinland-Pfalz.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 8/24/2015 11:04 AM, Arline Sachs sachs@... wrote:
Maybe I don't know what I am doing. I checked the site for names for
which I already have the death record, I tried Cahn and Kahn and the year
(1884 and 1917) neither person showed up. Both died in Mainz. Maybe they
did not do the larger city yet???


A word of caution regarding replies to requests for assistance #ukraine

Stephan Owen Parnes
 

Dear Friends,

Many of us are very happy to help our fellow researchers when they post
requests for assistance. Sometimes we feel that the response is of
sufficient general interest to share with the List; other times we wish to
share information privately. When we share information privately, we may be
doing so because we feel it is not information that is significant to the
general list or we may wish to share something sensitive information
privately.

When we desire to respond privately to a posted email, therefore, we must be
careful to review the addresses to which our reply is being sent.

Last week, however, I discovered a completely new (to me) problem. I set
up a response to a particular member of the list. I was careful to remove
the list's address >from the headers. I left the email in HTML, which is not
accepted by the list. I sent it to the private email address of the
poster--and only later discovered that it did not go to the poster but
rather to the list. Fortunately, the email was bounced automatically.
Unfortunately, it was only days later that my information was transmitted to
the original poster.

When I looked further into the issue, I discovered that although individual
poster's address was in the "To" field on the reply form, it was only
apparently that address. The actual address (which was the listserv
address) was hidden by the poster's address.

While I am not technically knowledgeable enough to understand how this came
about, I realize that this may have happened to other researchers as well.

I would therefore recommend that when you reply to an individual rather than
to the list, you respond using a blank email form (or that you erase all
addresses on the reply form) and type in the correct address without copying
and pasting.

May we all share great success in our searches.

Stephan Parnes
Lancaster, PA

Moderator's comment: It does work when you copy ONLY the sender's address
and paste it into a new email. Many automatically hit the "reply" button
which copies the ENTIRE digest and sends it to the list!


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine A word of caution regarding replies to requests for assistance #ukraine

Stephan Owen Parnes
 

Dear Friends,

Many of us are very happy to help our fellow researchers when they post
requests for assistance. Sometimes we feel that the response is of
sufficient general interest to share with the List; other times we wish to
share information privately. When we share information privately, we may be
doing so because we feel it is not information that is significant to the
general list or we may wish to share something sensitive information
privately.

When we desire to respond privately to a posted email, therefore, we must be
careful to review the addresses to which our reply is being sent.

Last week, however, I discovered a completely new (to me) problem. I set
up a response to a particular member of the list. I was careful to remove
the list's address >from the headers. I left the email in HTML, which is not
accepted by the list. I sent it to the private email address of the
poster--and only later discovered that it did not go to the poster but
rather to the list. Fortunately, the email was bounced automatically.
Unfortunately, it was only days later that my information was transmitted to
the original poster.

When I looked further into the issue, I discovered that although individual
poster's address was in the "To" field on the reply form, it was only
apparently that address. The actual address (which was the listserv
address) was hidden by the poster's address.

While I am not technically knowledgeable enough to understand how this came
about, I realize that this may have happened to other researchers as well.

I would therefore recommend that when you reply to an individual rather than
to the list, you respond using a blank email form (or that you erase all
addresses on the reply form) and type in the correct address without copying
and pasting.

May we all share great success in our searches.

Stephan Parnes
Lancaster, PA

Moderator's comment: It does work when you copy ONLY the sender's address
and paste it into a new email. Many automatically hit the "reply" button
which copies the ENTIRE digest and sends it to the list!


Ship Manifest Issue #ukraine

crl4242@...
 

Hi,
I am trying to find my paternal grandfather on the ship manifest. I know
the name of the ship and date of arrival >from his Petition for Citizenship.
And I found the manifest on Ancestry and Ellis Island. However, I cannot
find his name anywhere. I even checked the manifest for the same ship when
it arrived two months earlier with no luck. I had hoped to find his
Certificate of Arrival for Confirmation, but that document wasn't required
until the year after he arrived. Any suggestions?

Cheryl R. Lieberman
Falls Church, VA
Searching: Berg/Ehrenberg in Odessa, Gilbo/Gilpen in Kirovograd


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ship Manifest Issue #ukraine

crl4242@...
 

Hi,
I am trying to find my paternal grandfather on the ship manifest. I know
the name of the ship and date of arrival >from his Petition for Citizenship.
And I found the manifest on Ancestry and Ellis Island. However, I cannot
find his name anywhere. I even checked the manifest for the same ship when
it arrived two months earlier with no luck. I had hoped to find his
Certificate of Arrival for Confirmation, but that document wasn't required
until the year after he arrived. Any suggestions?

Cheryl R. Lieberman
Falls Church, VA
Searching: Berg/Ehrenberg in Odessa, Gilbo/Gilpen in Kirovograd


(US) USCIS Webinar: Overview on the Immigration & Naturalization Svc Aug 27, 2015 & Oct 22, 2015 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (USCIS) will be holding a
webinar on an Overview of Immigration and Naturalization Service(INS) Archives on
August 27, 2015 and on October 22, 2015 1:00PM EDT. The webinar will provide an
overview of historical Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) records
available to researchers at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The records
cover every aspect of immigration and naturalization policy >from the turn of the
twentieth century until 1975. Participants will learn about the most important
finding aids, see sample files, and learn how to request files >from the Archives.

This webinar is not recorded therefore, there is no opportunity to listen to
it after the actual time. There is a presentation handout available that
should be downloaded prior to the event's starting time. It may be accessed
at: http://tinyurl.com/noz279j
Original url:
http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/History%20and%20Genealogy/Our%20History/INSPolicyAndCorrespondenceRecords.pdf

To register for the webinar go to: http://www.uscis.gov/HGWebinars and
scroll down to the "Guide to I&N History Research and click on click on the
"attend session button" for the August 27 or October 22 date. That link
takes you to a redirection page which then takes you to a page:
http://tinyurl.com/nu45l2s
Original url:
https://connect16.uc.att.com/EventEntry/Websites/?VaccId=uscis&ExEventID=82058965&CT=M
where you are prompted to give your first, last names and email address and you
then click on "join". On that page you are asked to select windows based
(preferred) or web-based application.

While ATT Connect is windows-based, MAC users can use the web-based application.
You may be required to download information on this and also a demonstration
if you wish to watch. It is strongly recommended that you go to this page
to get familiar with the system BEFORE the day of the webinar.

If you have a problem please contact the support center by clicking where it
says "for troubleshooting" please contact our support center on the AT&T
connect page. Please do not contact me-I am not a techy nor have any affiliation
with the AT&T Connect application.

While on the webinar site: http://www.uscis.gov/HGWebinars look at the
upcoming Genealogy Program Webinars on, a 30-minute introduction to the
USCIS Genealogy Program to familiarize you with services, fees, website,
request processes and more.


Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US) USCIS Webinar: Overview on the Immigration & Naturalization Svc Aug 27, 2015 & Oct 22, 2015 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (USCIS) will be holding a
webinar on an Overview of Immigration and Naturalization Service(INS) Archives on
August 27, 2015 and on October 22, 2015 1:00PM EDT. The webinar will provide an
overview of historical Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) records
available to researchers at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The records
cover every aspect of immigration and naturalization policy >from the turn of the
twentieth century until 1975. Participants will learn about the most important
finding aids, see sample files, and learn how to request files >from the Archives.

This webinar is not recorded therefore, there is no opportunity to listen to
it after the actual time. There is a presentation handout available that
should be downloaded prior to the event's starting time. It may be accessed
at: http://tinyurl.com/noz279j
Original url:
http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/History%20and%20Genealogy/Our%20History/INSPolicyAndCorrespondenceRecords.pdf

To register for the webinar go to: http://www.uscis.gov/HGWebinars and
scroll down to the "Guide to I&N History Research and click on click on the
"attend session button" for the August 27 or October 22 date. That link
takes you to a redirection page which then takes you to a page:
http://tinyurl.com/nu45l2s
Original url:
https://connect16.uc.att.com/EventEntry/Websites/?VaccId=uscis&ExEventID=82058965&CT=M
where you are prompted to give your first, last names and email address and you
then click on "join". On that page you are asked to select windows based
(preferred) or web-based application.

While ATT Connect is windows-based, MAC users can use the web-based application.
You may be required to download information on this and also a demonstration
if you wish to watch. It is strongly recommended that you go to this page
to get familiar with the system BEFORE the day of the webinar.

If you have a problem please contact the support center by clicking where it
says "for troubleshooting" please contact our support center on the AT&T
connect page. Please do not contact me-I am not a techy nor have any affiliation
with the AT&T Connect application.

While on the webinar site: http://www.uscis.gov/HGWebinars look at the
upcoming Genealogy Program Webinars on, a 30-minute introduction to the
USCIS Genealogy Program to familiarize you with services, fees, website,
request processes and more.


Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee