Date   

Happy (secular) New Year #ukraine

cmw521@...
 

As we move into the 20 chai year, Ukraine SIG continues to look forward. To
all 4,046 of you who read our Discussion Group each day (as of 12/31/17), we
hope you have enjoyed sharing and learning with others about our shared
heritage over the past years. To those who have donated your time, energy,
and hard earned dollars, pounds, euros, rubles, etc. over the past year, we
thank you for all you have done.

As you make your resolutions for 2018, consider the gift that keeps on
giving - donating your time and energy to Ukraine SIG. Not that we don't
need your financial contribution (of course we do), but we have over 600
towns, many with projects waiting to be organized, in need of Town Leaders.
There are over 750 towns that have no KehilaLinks page. We have so many
opportunities that need someone to put in an hour or two per week to add
more to the Jewishgen-Ukraine database and to help us with our mission to
put information about every town and shtetl in Ukraine on line for
researchers to use as the research their own family histories. All of us at
Ukraine SIG are volunteers, and our sole compensation for all of the time
and effort we put into this ongoing project is the satisfaction of hearing
from you that you have found new generations of your family tree in records
that we have been able to acquire and put into the database.

None of this requires great skills or technical knowledge, merely a desire
to give back for all you receive >from JewishGen and Ukraine SIG. Your
donations are gratefully accepted in the names of all who trace their
families back to the areas we cover.

Please also have a look at the projects that have already been organized and
are in the fund raising stage at
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=2
2. If you go to your Town Page and see a project that can help you and
others and it is not in fund raising, contact Janette Silverman or me, about
how to begin the fund raising. It will only get harder in the future to
fund these projects and there is no time like the present to get this
material moving toward being available for all.

Looking forward to great things in 2018. Keep checking back!


Chuck Weinstein
Towns Director, Ukraine SIG
Cmw521@earthlink.net
www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine
www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505

Moderator's comment: And, >from your moderating team, a very Happy, Healthy,
and Genealogically Prosperous New Year.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Happy (secular) New Year #ukraine

cmw521@...
 

As we move into the 20 chai year, Ukraine SIG continues to look forward. To
all 4,046 of you who read our Discussion Group each day (as of 12/31/17), we
hope you have enjoyed sharing and learning with others about our shared
heritage over the past years. To those who have donated your time, energy,
and hard earned dollars, pounds, euros, rubles, etc. over the past year, we
thank you for all you have done.

As you make your resolutions for 2018, consider the gift that keeps on
giving - donating your time and energy to Ukraine SIG. Not that we don't
need your financial contribution (of course we do), but we have over 600
towns, many with projects waiting to be organized, in need of Town Leaders.
There are over 750 towns that have no KehilaLinks page. We have so many
opportunities that need someone to put in an hour or two per week to add
more to the Jewishgen-Ukraine database and to help us with our mission to
put information about every town and shtetl in Ukraine on line for
researchers to use as the research their own family histories. All of us at
Ukraine SIG are volunteers, and our sole compensation for all of the time
and effort we put into this ongoing project is the satisfaction of hearing
from you that you have found new generations of your family tree in records
that we have been able to acquire and put into the database.

None of this requires great skills or technical knowledge, merely a desire
to give back for all you receive >from JewishGen and Ukraine SIG. Your
donations are gratefully accepted in the names of all who trace their
families back to the areas we cover.

Please also have a look at the projects that have already been organized and
are in the fund raising stage at
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=2
2. If you go to your Town Page and see a project that can help you and
others and it is not in fund raising, contact Janette Silverman or me, about
how to begin the fund raising. It will only get harder in the future to
fund these projects and there is no time like the present to get this
material moving toward being available for all.

Looking forward to great things in 2018. Keep checking back!


Chuck Weinstein
Towns Director, Ukraine SIG
Cmw521@earthlink.net
www.jewishgen.org/Ukraine
www.facebook.com/pages/Ukraine-SIG/180102942060505

Moderator's comment: And, >from your moderating team, a very Happy, Healthy,
and Genealogically Prosperous New Year.


New archival inventories on the Gesher Galicia website! #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia has added three new inventories of Jewish records from
state archives in southeastern Poland - with thanks to Pawel
Malinowski for his valuable assistance. These list all the Jewish
Galician vital records (and in some cases community records and
municipal records) >from the state archive branches in Nowy Sacz,
Przemysl and Tarnow. Inventories for the archives in Rzeszow and Sanok
were added some months ago.

Where scans of record sets are available online, links to the page
images are given in all our online inventories. Inventories from
southeastern Poland can be found on the Gesher Galicia website at:

- Nowy Sacz archive: <https://tinyurl.com/y9y9fak7>
- Przemysl archive: <https://tinyurl.com/yaav2w3f>
- Rzeszow archive: <https://tinyurl.com/ybrkca2l>
- Sanok archive: <https://tinyurl.com/y8do9lsw>
- Tarnow archive: <https://tinyurl.com/y77uwm23>.

Gesher Galicia already has online inventories for the Jewish Galician
vital records in Fond 300 at AGAD, Warsaw:
- sorted by town: <https://tinyurl.com/y87rastq> and
- sorted by file number: <https://tinyurl.com/y7xaefpw>,
as well as for those at AGAD in Fond 424, at: <https://tinyurl.com/y7jwe8g7=
.
There are also inventories for Jewish Galician vital records and some
community records >from the Ukrainian state archives (based in Lviv,
Ivano-Frankivsk and Ternopil), at:
- sorted by town: <https://tinyurl.com/ycwmqg4n> and
- sorted by file number: <https://tinyurl.com/y7y4ddkd>.

For the inventories of records held at AGAD and for those in Ukrainian
archives, a color-shading system shows the records indexed by Gesher
Galicia and searchable on the All Galicia Database, and those indexed
by JRI-Poland and available on their online database.

Inventories for Jewish records >from the National Archive in Krakow and
its sub-archive in Bochnia will follow in 2018, to complete Gesher
Galicia's inventories of the Polish and Ukrainian state archives
holding Jewish Galician records. The existing online inventories will
kept fully updated.

For further information, please contact: <info@geshergalicia.org>.
Please do NOT reply to this email.


Tony Kahane
Chair & Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org

---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org


New records on the All Galicia Database #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded to the All Galicia Database
<https://search.geshergalicia.org> the indexes of the following record
set:

- Stanislawow (Ivano-Frankivsk). Jewish births 1926-1930. State
Archive of Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast (DAIFO), Fond 631/2/75-79 (2,710
records).

The remaining records in the 2017 Vital Records Project - Tarnopol
Jewish marriages, 1934-1939 - will be completed in early January. We
are starting work this week on:
- records >from 16 towns (both eastern and western Galicia) in the
2018 Vital Records Project;
- records >from 15 towns in the 2018 Josephine & Franciscan Cadastral
Surveys Project;
- some important records in the Holocaust Project >from southeastern Poland;
- Jewish Taxpayer records >from the Stanislawow and Tarnopol areas
from the 1930s;
- the new Galician Medical Students/Doctors Project;
- the Fond 424 project;
and - as always - more interesting regional and cadastral maps.

You can read more about all our research projects for 2018 at:
<https://tinyurl.com/y7daagtz/>.

For further information, please contact: <info@geshergalicia.org>.
Please do NOT reply to this email.


Gesher Galicia wishes all members and supporters a very good New Year!


Tony Kahane
Chair & Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org

---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New archival inventories on the Gesher Galicia website! #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia has added three new inventories of Jewish records from
state archives in southeastern Poland - with thanks to Pawel
Malinowski for his valuable assistance. These list all the Jewish
Galician vital records (and in some cases community records and
municipal records) >from the state archive branches in Nowy Sacz,
Przemysl and Tarnow. Inventories for the archives in Rzeszow and Sanok
were added some months ago.

Where scans of record sets are available online, links to the page
images are given in all our online inventories. Inventories from
southeastern Poland can be found on the Gesher Galicia website at:

- Nowy Sacz archive: <https://tinyurl.com/y9y9fak7>
- Przemysl archive: <https://tinyurl.com/yaav2w3f>
- Rzeszow archive: <https://tinyurl.com/ybrkca2l>
- Sanok archive: <https://tinyurl.com/y8do9lsw>
- Tarnow archive: <https://tinyurl.com/y77uwm23>.

Gesher Galicia already has online inventories for the Jewish Galician
vital records in Fond 300 at AGAD, Warsaw:
- sorted by town: <https://tinyurl.com/y87rastq> and
- sorted by file number: <https://tinyurl.com/y7xaefpw>,
as well as for those at AGAD in Fond 424, at: <https://tinyurl.com/y7jwe8g7=
.
There are also inventories for Jewish Galician vital records and some
community records >from the Ukrainian state archives (based in Lviv,
Ivano-Frankivsk and Ternopil), at:
- sorted by town: <https://tinyurl.com/ycwmqg4n> and
- sorted by file number: <https://tinyurl.com/y7y4ddkd>.

For the inventories of records held at AGAD and for those in Ukrainian
archives, a color-shading system shows the records indexed by Gesher
Galicia and searchable on the All Galicia Database, and those indexed
by JRI-Poland and available on their online database.

Inventories for Jewish records >from the National Archive in Krakow and
its sub-archive in Bochnia will follow in 2018, to complete Gesher
Galicia's inventories of the Polish and Ukrainian state archives
holding Jewish Galician records. The existing online inventories will
kept fully updated.

For further information, please contact: <info@geshergalicia.org>.
Please do NOT reply to this email.


Tony Kahane
Chair & Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org

---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New records on the All Galicia Database #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia has uploaded to the All Galicia Database
<https://search.geshergalicia.org> the indexes of the following record
set:

- Stanislawow (Ivano-Frankivsk). Jewish births 1926-1930. State
Archive of Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast (DAIFO), Fond 631/2/75-79 (2,710
records).

The remaining records in the 2017 Vital Records Project - Tarnopol
Jewish marriages, 1934-1939 - will be completed in early January. We
are starting work this week on:
- records >from 16 towns (both eastern and western Galicia) in the
2018 Vital Records Project;
- records >from 15 towns in the 2018 Josephine & Franciscan Cadastral
Surveys Project;
- some important records in the Holocaust Project >from southeastern Poland;
- Jewish Taxpayer records >from the Stanislawow and Tarnopol areas
from the 1930s;
- the new Galician Medical Students/Doctors Project;
- the Fond 424 project;
and - as always - more interesting regional and cadastral maps.

You can read more about all our research projects for 2018 at:
<https://tinyurl.com/y7daagtz/>.

For further information, please contact: <info@geshergalicia.org>.
Please do NOT reply to this email.


Gesher Galicia wishes all members and supporters a very good New Year!


Tony Kahane
Chair & Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
www.geshergalicia.org

---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to info@geshergalicia.org
---


Re: Names before Jews had surnames #germany

Eva Lawrence
 

Lin asked about her ancestor Baer Cohn. I've been looking into the
question of Jewish names before Napoleonic name-adoption, and it seems
that COHN is not a patronymic but a regular surname which can be passed
on >from father to child. My 5x great-grandfather was Benjamn COHEN and
his daughter, my 4x great-grandmother was Elke COHEN, and he sisters
also used that surname. It must have been the choice in the case of
Baer COHN's descendants, not to use that surname as they were entitled
to, but HERZ instead.

As for the father's name: the thing about death certificates is that
they were often issued by non-Jewish officials who didn't understand
Jewish naming practices, so the name quoted in this case must be
viewed with suspicion. It may just have been the popular name he went
by in his old age - the old COHEN who is related to Baer, now the
head of the household, rather than the first name given to the old man
at his Brith.


Eva Lawrence, St Albans, UK. eva.lawrence@idnet.com


Re: Question about a name before Jews had surnames #germany

lutz petzold <lutzhpetzold@...>
 

Lin, here is what I know:

[Moderator note: when no other source is
cited, message content should be understood to
be the writer's opinion.
Other * opinions * regarding Cohan (and other spellings) traditions
should be discussed off list.
Only Messages citing authoritative sources on Jewish and civil
naming traditions and rules in Germany will be considered
for approval to this list.] =================================>

Cohan was always a last name. I think it merely meant to the local
community, the Cohan himself. Traditionally to be Cohan, the father had
to be a Cohan, and the son might be a Cohan if he could complete Cohan
training and be ordained. It's safe to say not every Cohan's son became
a Cohan himself because it took more then being born the son of a Cohan.
So, the name Cohan has a onetime name. The first name traditionally
was a given name, not at birth, but a name the parents gave when a child
was growing up and based on their body language. Animal characteristics
were common for boys, flowers for girls and birds for girls. A
courageous or friendly child could be named a Herz, a boys boy could be
called a Baer, a pretty girl a Blumle (diminuative flower). The Jews
also used the diminuative form of a first name by adding an 'le' or just
'l', usually for girls. People were not all that original in those
days, and there was a tradition of honoring deceased family members, so
the same first names were widely recirculated. How did they prevent
confusion among all the same named relatives? They had nicknames in the
immediate family, to tell them apart. It was common in Europe that
when adults made a name for themselves outside their village, that
another name would be added to prevent confusion (there would be many
Baer's and cohans in the state). Usually that was the name of the town.
Cohans in particular were typically known outside the local area, since
there was one Cohan for a locale, not many Cohans, so the name of the
town would be added to their name, like Brandeis for the Cohan of
Brandeis (Bohemia). This was all losey goosey, until formal civil
registration became the law, and everyone (Jews and non-Jews) had to
come up with a last name, as well as first name. Non-Jews were recorded
with their church which sometime in the middle-ages required a first and
last name for organizational reasons), but synagogues did not have that
tradition/requirement, so when mandatory birth/marriage/death civil
registry became the law, the head of the family decided what name to use
and sometimes the local registrar decided on a whim when he wrote down
the name >from what he thought he heard the registrant say. In those
days they all spoke dialects, there was no standard education, and
generally only the clergy or town clerks could read and write the
language of the country, or they improvised.

My take on the comment >from your excentric friend is, about Baer meaning
'born', this is something new to me, but if I had to search for an
explanation, I do not think it would be far fetched because in the
German language a woman gives birth to a child the term used is
'gebaeren'. The English word 'born' or 'birth' has the same roots. In
German it would be 'Geburt' and the verb 'gebaeren'. Yiddish commonly
shortenend words into the colloquial to make it roll off the tongue.
That is common among all local German speakers. High German was created
to standardized the language away >from local dialects and habit, so they
all could understand each other throughout the country.

Lutz Petzold - lutzhpetzold@gmail.com

On Dec 30, 2017, Lin Herz <lin2@cfl.rr.com> wrote:
My 4x great grandfather's name was Baer Cohn. He was born and
died in Schwarzenau. I'm guessing he was probably was born
between 1720 something and 1740 something since his son, Herz Baer was
born in 1768. . (I don't have their second names capitalized as
they are patronymics.) [Moderator comment: That's right.]

I don't understand the name Baer Cohn. Could his father's
first name have been Cohn? Our Herz family are Cohains, but was Cohn
or Cohain ever used as a first name?


German SIG #Germany Re: Names before Jews had surnames #germany

Eva Lawrence
 

Lin asked about her ancestor Baer Cohn. I've been looking into the
question of Jewish names before Napoleonic name-adoption, and it seems
that COHN is not a patronymic but a regular surname which can be passed
on >from father to child. My 5x great-grandfather was Benjamn COHEN and
his daughter, my 4x great-grandmother was Elke COHEN, and he sisters
also used that surname. It must have been the choice in the case of
Baer COHN's descendants, not to use that surname as they were entitled
to, but HERZ instead.

As for the father's name: the thing about death certificates is that
they were often issued by non-Jewish officials who didn't understand
Jewish naming practices, so the name quoted in this case must be
viewed with suspicion. It may just have been the popular name he went
by in his old age - the old COHEN who is related to Baer, now the
head of the household, rather than the first name given to the old man
at his Brith.


Eva Lawrence, St Albans, UK. eva.lawrence@idnet.com


German SIG #Germany Re: Question about a name before Jews had surnames #germany

lutz petzold <lutzhpetzold@...>
 

Lin, here is what I know:

[Moderator note: when no other source is
cited, message content should be understood to
be the writer's opinion.
Other * opinions * regarding Cohan (and other spellings) traditions
should be discussed off list.
Only Messages citing authoritative sources on Jewish and civil
naming traditions and rules in Germany will be considered
for approval to this list.] =================================>

Cohan was always a last name. I think it merely meant to the local
community, the Cohan himself. Traditionally to be Cohan, the father had
to be a Cohan, and the son might be a Cohan if he could complete Cohan
training and be ordained. It's safe to say not every Cohan's son became
a Cohan himself because it took more then being born the son of a Cohan.
So, the name Cohan has a onetime name. The first name traditionally
was a given name, not at birth, but a name the parents gave when a child
was growing up and based on their body language. Animal characteristics
were common for boys, flowers for girls and birds for girls. A
courageous or friendly child could be named a Herz, a boys boy could be
called a Baer, a pretty girl a Blumle (diminuative flower). The Jews
also used the diminuative form of a first name by adding an 'le' or just
'l', usually for girls. People were not all that original in those
days, and there was a tradition of honoring deceased family members, so
the same first names were widely recirculated. How did they prevent
confusion among all the same named relatives? They had nicknames in the
immediate family, to tell them apart. It was common in Europe that
when adults made a name for themselves outside their village, that
another name would be added to prevent confusion (there would be many
Baer's and cohans in the state). Usually that was the name of the town.
Cohans in particular were typically known outside the local area, since
there was one Cohan for a locale, not many Cohans, so the name of the
town would be added to their name, like Brandeis for the Cohan of
Brandeis (Bohemia). This was all losey goosey, until formal civil
registration became the law, and everyone (Jews and non-Jews) had to
come up with a last name, as well as first name. Non-Jews were recorded
with their church which sometime in the middle-ages required a first and
last name for organizational reasons), but synagogues did not have that
tradition/requirement, so when mandatory birth/marriage/death civil
registry became the law, the head of the family decided what name to use
and sometimes the local registrar decided on a whim when he wrote down
the name >from what he thought he heard the registrant say. In those
days they all spoke dialects, there was no standard education, and
generally only the clergy or town clerks could read and write the
language of the country, or they improvised.

My take on the comment >from your excentric friend is, about Baer meaning
'born', this is something new to me, but if I had to search for an
explanation, I do not think it would be far fetched because in the
German language a woman gives birth to a child the term used is
'gebaeren'. The English word 'born' or 'birth' has the same roots. In
German it would be 'Geburt' and the verb 'gebaeren'. Yiddish commonly
shortenend words into the colloquial to make it roll off the tongue.
That is common among all local German speakers. High German was created
to standardized the language away >from local dialects and habit, so they
all could understand each other throughout the country.

Lutz Petzold - lutzhpetzold@gmail.com

On Dec 30, 2017, Lin Herz <lin2@cfl.rr.com> wrote:
My 4x great grandfather's name was Baer Cohn. He was born and
died in Schwarzenau. I'm guessing he was probably was born
between 1720 something and 1740 something since his son, Herz Baer was
born in 1768. . (I don't have their second names capitalized as
they are patronymics.) [Moderator comment: That's right.]

I don't understand the name Baer Cohn. Could his father's
first name have been Cohn? Our Herz family are Cohains, but was Cohn
or Cohain ever used as a first name?


Re: Oroszvar records #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Peter,

What is the time period covered by the records you want? If you are =
looking for records less than 100 years old you may have a problem due =
to privacy rules. I have had considerable success by contacting =
municipal archives for records for members of my immediate family.

Vivian Kahn


On Dec 30, 2017, at 11:04 PM, H-SIG digest <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> =
wrote:
=20
Subject: Oroszvar records
From: pgbakos@hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2017 23:10:33 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1
=20
I am seeking the registers of Oroszvar/Rosovce presently in Slovakia. =
(It was transferred in 1946 not 1919)
This place was near Rajka in Moson. =20
=20
Budapest or Bratislava?
=20
Please don't direct me to the Family Search site as there is no longer =
any link to Jewish records there.
=20
Peter G. Bakos
St Crespin, France
SCHUSTER, Gyor, Papa


Re: IZSAK from Nagyvarad to Argentina #hungary

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Michele,

Perhaps this will help.

If you go to this Buenos Aires website:
http://www.amia.org.ar/index.php/services/default/sepelios

under "Funeral Services" you can put in the Surname and you will get
information on who is buried and in which cemetery. I tried your
IZSAK and there were two, including one Ignacio, which might be the
Ignatz you are looking for.

Good luck,

Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
Beverly Hills, CA

Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN in various parts of
Galicia, Poland, such as: Nowy Targ, Wachsmund, Lopuszna, Ochotnica,
possibly Krakow, who migrated into Kezmarok or nearby
Straszky/Nagy-Eor/Nehre, both now in Slovakia.
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena), Szkaros, Szikso, and Kosice, Slovakia;
Tolcsva, Hungary; Possibly Timosoara, Romania


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:Oroszvar records #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Peter,

What is the time period covered by the records you want? If you are =
looking for records less than 100 years old you may have a problem due =
to privacy rules. I have had considerable success by contacting =
municipal archives for records for members of my immediate family.

Vivian Kahn


On Dec 30, 2017, at 11:04 PM, H-SIG digest <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> =
wrote:
=20
Subject: Oroszvar records
From: pgbakos@hotmail.com
Date: Sat, 30 Dec 2017 23:10:33 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1
=20
I am seeking the registers of Oroszvar/Rosovce presently in Slovakia. =
(It was transferred in 1946 not 1919)
This place was near Rajka in Moson. =20
=20
Budapest or Bratislava?
=20
Please don't direct me to the Family Search site as there is no longer =
any link to Jewish records there.
=20
Peter G. Bakos
St Crespin, France
SCHUSTER, Gyor, Papa


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: IZSAK from Nagyvarad to Argentina #hungary

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Michele,

Perhaps this will help.

If you go to this Buenos Aires website:
http://www.amia.org.ar/index.php/services/default/sepelios

under "Funeral Services" you can put in the Surname and you will get
information on who is buried and in which cemetery. I tried your
IZSAK and there were two, including one Ignacio, which might be the
Ignatz you are looking for.

Good luck,

Madeleine Isenberg
madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
Beverly Hills, CA

Researching: GOLDMAN, STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN in various parts of
Galicia, Poland, such as: Nowy Targ, Wachsmund, Lopuszna, Ochotnica,
possibly Krakow, who migrated into Kezmarok or nearby
Straszky/Nagy-Eor/Nehre, both now in Slovakia.
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena), Szkaros, Szikso, and Kosice, Slovakia;
Tolcsva, Hungary; Possibly Timosoara, Romania


Oroszvar records #hungary

shayzaf1@...
 

This is the link to the Oroszvar Jewish Records at Familysearch.

You have to sign in in order to see the records.

Jacob shayzaf, Israel


Marriage records for Magyarfalu/Zahorska Ves #hungary

helendouch@...
 

My great grandparents Josefine Karpfen and Armin (aka Hermann) Bock were
married in December 1903 in Magyarfalu (I think it is now known as
Zahorska Ves) in what is now Slovakia near the Austrian border. I would
be grateful if anyone can tell me where the marriage records are likely
to be kept.

Also, I am not sure why they were married there in the first place. My
great grandfather's family is >from St Johann/Moravsky Svaty Jan though
he was born in Vienna, and my great grandmother was born in Brno though
her parents were >from Pohorelice and Iglau in Moravia. Any ideas
gratefully received.

Regards, Helen (near Lowestoft, United Kingdom)


Re: Conflicting info on JOWBR at JewishGen Hungary database #hungary

tom
 

there are many possible reasons for discrepancies, especially in transcribed=
records, no matter how hard we try to avoid errors. stuff happens. it's=
always best to look at the original documents, in this case the photo of=
the stone itself, if at all possible.

the picture of David Shlomo SCHWARTZ's stone offers very little additional=
information, but it does say that he was the son of Avraham (a"h). =
somebody seems to have entered it as spouse instead of father.

there is no picture for Aharon SCHWARTZ, 's date of death, so no idea where=
the 1905 comes from. it might be a misreading or a typo. you should try=
to get a picture.

tom klein, toronto



elisefmiller68@gmail.com wrote:

[snip!]

... but certain facts did not make
sense. I was hoping someone can explain:

1-David Shlomo Schwartz died at 55 (correct age) on 10
Tamuz 5671, which converts to July 6, 1911 (possible), but the details
say his =92??Spouse=92?? was =92??Abraham=92??! His spouse was my ggm=
Estica (Ester).
Why Abraham?

2-=92??Aharon Schwartz=92?? (Hebrew name, correct), =92??date 1=
905=92??
(possible) and =92??father Dovid=92??. But then when I go into the details,=
it
says =92??28 Tamuz 5684=92?? which converts to 30 July 1924! Why 2 very
different dates, one in English, the other Hebrew?

[snip!]


Hungary SIG #Hungary Oroszvar records #hungary

shayzaf1@...
 

This is the link to the Oroszvar Jewish Records at Familysearch.

You have to sign in in order to see the records.

Jacob shayzaf, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Marriage records for Magyarfalu/Zahorska Ves #hungary

helendouch@...
 

My great grandparents Josefine Karpfen and Armin (aka Hermann) Bock were
married in December 1903 in Magyarfalu (I think it is now known as
Zahorska Ves) in what is now Slovakia near the Austrian border. I would
be grateful if anyone can tell me where the marriage records are likely
to be kept.

Also, I am not sure why they were married there in the first place. My
great grandfather's family is >from St Johann/Moravsky Svaty Jan though
he was born in Vienna, and my great grandmother was born in Brno though
her parents were >from Pohorelice and Iglau in Moravia. Any ideas
gratefully received.

Regards, Helen (near Lowestoft, United Kingdom)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Conflicting info on JOWBR at JewishGen Hungary database #hungary

tom
 

there are many possible reasons for discrepancies, especially in transcribed=
records, no matter how hard we try to avoid errors. stuff happens. it's=
always best to look at the original documents, in this case the photo of=
the stone itself, if at all possible.

the picture of David Shlomo SCHWARTZ's stone offers very little additional=
information, but it does say that he was the son of Avraham (a"h). =
somebody seems to have entered it as spouse instead of father.

there is no picture for Aharon SCHWARTZ, 's date of death, so no idea where=
the 1905 comes from. it might be a misreading or a typo. you should try=
to get a picture.

tom klein, toronto



elisefmiller68@gmail.com wrote:

[snip!]

... but certain facts did not make
sense. I was hoping someone can explain:

1-David Shlomo Schwartz died at 55 (correct age) on 10
Tamuz 5671, which converts to July 6, 1911 (possible), but the details
say his =92??Spouse=92?? was =92??Abraham=92??! His spouse was my ggm=
Estica (Ester).
Why Abraham?

2-=92??Aharon Schwartz=92?? (Hebrew name, correct), =92??date 1=
905=92??
(possible) and =92??father Dovid=92??. But then when I go into the details,=
it
says =92??28 Tamuz 5684=92?? which converts to 30 July 1924! Why 2 very
different dates, one in English, the other Hebrew?

[snip!]

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