Date   

Yizkor Book Project, January 2018 #poland #warsaw

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

The Yizkor Book Project definitely began 2018 on the upswing and, as
such, there is quite a great deal to report.

To begin with, we added in three new projects this month:

- The Jacob Rassen Story - Describing this man's journey through the
last years of the Eastern European shtetl to the modern American
world. Kindly donated by his son, Joshua Rassen.
- Children Train - Presented to us by the indefatigable Willian
Leibner who brings us the story of one of the largest Jewish children
transport >from liberated Poland to France.
- History of the Zalaegerszeg Jewry >from their Settlement to the
Present - We have been presented by Yad Vashem of some 1,300 names
extracted >from this book of Jews >from this region in Hungary, deported
to the Zalaegerszeg Ghetto in 1944

In addition to these, Meir G. Gover has kindly provided us with a
download link the book "Ordinary Jews", covering the massacre in 1942
of the Lomazy Jews. The link to this book can be found under Lomazy in
our Translations Index - see link below.

We continued to update existing projects with newly translated
material and amongst these updates last month, is the necrology coming
from the Gniewashow, Poland Yizkor book with some 1,200 names of
Jewish martyrs. This list was prepared by yet another, tireless
volunteer - Rabbi Shalom Bronstein and we are truly indebted to his
dedication in preparing these disturbing, but at the same time,
uniquely important necrologies.

I am also pleased to inform you that the Yizkor Book in Print Project
provided us with another gem during January - the book "Book of
Gostynin, Poland" which will be welcomed by all of you with
connections to this community. For a full listing of the 65 books we
now have available, suggest you click on the YBIP link provided at the
end of this report. And as we say in Hebrew - "Kol Hakavod" to the
YBIP team for continuing to make these carefully prepared volumes
available to us.

Last month, a Ostrowiec Translations Fund was set up to lead the way
into translating its Yizkor book, which contains an impressive list of
articles on this community - its people and its culture. The material
in Hebrew and Yiddish is just waiting to be translated and made
available to the English reader with connections to thus community. If
you are able to financially support this or any other project we have
running, suggest you visit the JewishGen-erosity page whose link
appears at the end of this report.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in January.

We have in 3 new books:

- Children Train
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Children_Train/Children_Train.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Zalaegerszeg, Hungary (History of the Zalaegerszeg Jewry >from their
Settlement to the Present )
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zalaegerszeg/Zalaegerszeg.html

and added in 3 new entries:

- Aziarnica, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00367.html

- Iody, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00363.html

- Ozery, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00364.html

And we have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial
Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Krasnobrod, Poland (Krasnobrod; a Memorial to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krasnobrod/Krasnobrod.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nyasvizh, Belarus (The Nesvizh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nesvizh/nesvizh.html

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the ruins
of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radekhov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radikhov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radekhov/Radekhov.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Vishnevets, Ukraine (Memorial book to the martyrs of Vishnevets who
perished in the Nazi Holocaust)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Vishnevets/Vishnevets.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wierzbnik, Poland (Wierzbnik-Starachowitz; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wierzbnik/Wierzbnik.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Yizkor Book Project, January 2018 #warsaw #poland

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

The Yizkor Book Project definitely began 2018 on the upswing and, as
such, there is quite a great deal to report.

To begin with, we added in three new projects this month:

- The Jacob Rassen Story - Describing this man's journey through the
last years of the Eastern European shtetl to the modern American
world. Kindly donated by his son, Joshua Rassen.
- Children Train - Presented to us by the indefatigable Willian
Leibner who brings us the story of one of the largest Jewish children
transport >from liberated Poland to France.
- History of the Zalaegerszeg Jewry >from their Settlement to the
Present - We have been presented by Yad Vashem of some 1,300 names
extracted >from this book of Jews >from this region in Hungary, deported
to the Zalaegerszeg Ghetto in 1944

In addition to these, Meir G. Gover has kindly provided us with a
download link the book "Ordinary Jews", covering the massacre in 1942
of the Lomazy Jews. The link to this book can be found under Lomazy in
our Translations Index - see link below.

We continued to update existing projects with newly translated
material and amongst these updates last month, is the necrology coming
from the Gniewashow, Poland Yizkor book with some 1,200 names of
Jewish martyrs. This list was prepared by yet another, tireless
volunteer - Rabbi Shalom Bronstein and we are truly indebted to his
dedication in preparing these disturbing, but at the same time,
uniquely important necrologies.

I am also pleased to inform you that the Yizkor Book in Print Project
provided us with another gem during January - the book "Book of
Gostynin, Poland" which will be welcomed by all of you with
connections to this community. For a full listing of the 65 books we
now have available, suggest you click on the YBIP link provided at the
end of this report. And as we say in Hebrew - "Kol Hakavod" to the
YBIP team for continuing to make these carefully prepared volumes
available to us.

Last month, a Ostrowiec Translations Fund was set up to lead the way
into translating its Yizkor book, which contains an impressive list of
articles on this community - its people and its culture. The material
in Hebrew and Yiddish is just waiting to be translated and made
available to the English reader with connections to thus community. If
you are able to financially support this or any other project we have
running, suggest you visit the JewishGen-erosity page whose link
appears at the end of this report.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in January.

We have in 3 new books:

- Children Train
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Children_Train/Children_Train.html

- The Jacob Rassen Story
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JacobRassen/JacobRassen.html

- Zalaegerszeg, Hungary (History of the Zalaegerszeg Jewry >from their
Settlement to the Present )
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zalaegerszeg/Zalaegerszeg.html

and added in 3 new entries:

- Aziarnica, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00367.html

- Iody, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00363.html

- Ozery, Belarus (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol8_00364.html

And we have continued to update 24 of our existing projects:

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns
of its District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Brody, Ukraine (An Eternal Light: Brody in Memoriam)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brody/brody.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskis, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine (Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial
Book) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ekaterinoslav/Ekaterinoslav.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno,
Wolyn) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Gniewashow, Poland (Memorial Book Gniewashow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gniewoszow/Gniewoszow.html

- Kherson, Ukraine (Jewish Farmers in Russian Fields)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JewishFarmers/JewishFarmers.html

- Krasnobrod, Poland (Krasnobrod; a Memorial to the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krasnobrod/Krasnobrod.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Narach (Kobylnik), Belarus (Memorial Book of Kobylnik)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Kobylnik/Kobylnik.html

- Nyasvizh, Belarus (The Nesvizh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/nesvizh/nesvizh.html

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the ruins
of an annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radekhov, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Radikhov)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Radekhov/Radekhov.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk - Memorial book of the Martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Vishnevets, Ukraine (Memorial book to the martyrs of Vishnevets who
perished in the Nazi Holocaust)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Vishnevets/Vishnevets.html

- Voranava, Belarus (Voronovo: Memorial Book to the Martyrs of
Voronovo) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/voronovo/voronovo.html

- We want to live
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/WantToLive/WantToLive.html

- Wierzbnik, Poland (Wierzbnik-Starachowitz; a memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wierzbnik/Wierzbnik.html

- Wyszkow, Poland (Wyszkow Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wyszkow/Wyszkow.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to
find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations
go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


My Great-Great-Grandfather's first wife #general

David Goldman
 

Hello, Jewishgenners. You may remember the story I have presented about the
discovery that my great-great-grandfather had a first wife in Zhitomir
before he moved on to the Odessa area. The first wife had been previously
divorced several years earlier and was in fact years older (between 4 and 10
depending on the record).

Now I have discovered that my gggf and his first wife divorced in Zhitomir
in 1875 (1-2 years after the marriage) when the first wife was two months
pregnant with a son who was eventually born and attributed in the records to
my gggf and not to a case of adultery.

In terms of the family, no one ever heard or mentioned this child, but the
most interesting question would be what possible reason in 1875 could have
forced this divorce just after the wife became pregnant?!

The only possibility I could come up with is that although the child was the
son of my gggf perhaps his wife was "fooling around". Of course what makes
this difficult is simply that she had been previously married and divorced,
so if she had this trait it is hard to conceive that he would have married
her, **unless** possibly **he** was having a relationship with her when she
was still married to her first husband.......

This even goes beyond the question we discussed earlier about why my young
gggf would have even married an older divorcee in the first place (who had
only been married for a couple of years to her **first** husband who according
to the records was 30 years older than her!).

I look forward to your comments.

David Goldman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen My Great-Great-Grandfather's first wife #general

David Goldman
 

Hello, Jewishgenners. You may remember the story I have presented about the
discovery that my great-great-grandfather had a first wife in Zhitomir
before he moved on to the Odessa area. The first wife had been previously
divorced several years earlier and was in fact years older (between 4 and 10
depending on the record).

Now I have discovered that my gggf and his first wife divorced in Zhitomir
in 1875 (1-2 years after the marriage) when the first wife was two months
pregnant with a son who was eventually born and attributed in the records to
my gggf and not to a case of adultery.

In terms of the family, no one ever heard or mentioned this child, but the
most interesting question would be what possible reason in 1875 could have
forced this divorce just after the wife became pregnant?!

The only possibility I could come up with is that although the child was the
son of my gggf perhaps his wife was "fooling around". Of course what makes
this difficult is simply that she had been previously married and divorced,
so if she had this trait it is hard to conceive that he would have married
her, **unless** possibly **he** was having a relationship with her when she
was still married to her first husband.......

This even goes beyond the question we discussed earlier about why my young
gggf would have even married an older divorcee in the first place (who had
only been married for a couple of years to her **first** husband who according
to the records was 30 years older than her!).

I look forward to your comments.

David Goldman


SHAPIRA family of Dov Alexander and Levina #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with this family. Levina was one of those killed in
2002 in the Hebrew University caferteria bombing. Their children are Adi,
married Erez, and two sons Zvi and Uri

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Respond privately with contact information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SHAPIRA family of Dov Alexander and Levina #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with this family. Levina was one of those killed in
2002 in the Hebrew University caferteria bombing. Their children are Adi,
married Erez, and two sons Zvi and Uri

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Respond privately with contact information.


Adoptee in UK Seeking Jewish Birth Father #general

Pat Fuller
 

Hi Genners - I have been helping a woman in South Yorkshire, UK, search for
her Jewish birth father's family, but have reached the limits of my
knowledge and expertise and need some help going further. It would be nice
to find someone in the UK (or familiar with UK records and systems) and also
knowledgeable in helping adoptees find birth families.

She was born in Sheffield in 1965. She has submitted her DNA to all of the
major companies and is communicating with her matches (she matches a 3rd
cousin of mine but not me). Until she received her DNA results, she did not
know that she had Jewish ancestry. Ancestry DNA says that she is 19%
European Jewish, and the large majority of her DNA matches are Jewish. She
knows her birth mother is not Jewish.

If you would be willing to help her find her birth father and/or his family,
I will put you in touch with her. I am sure that with all your collective
wisdom and generosity, she will be able to make some progress in her quest.
Please respond privately to patbfuller@roadrunner.com.

Thanks so much!

Pat Redman Fuller
Simi Valley, California, USA

RESEARCHING: FAINBOIM Basarabeasca Moldova; KAPLITS Ukmerge Lithuania;
LEVITAN Kaliningrad Russia; LIPPMAN Taurage Lithuania; MUSS Ukmerge
Lithuania; NATHANSON Taurage Lithuania; RACHBUCH Husi and Hoceni Romania;
ROITMAN Carpineni Moldova; SHKOLNIK Hincesti Moldova


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Adoptee in UK Seeking Jewish Birth Father #general

Pat Fuller
 

Hi Genners - I have been helping a woman in South Yorkshire, UK, search for
her Jewish birth father's family, but have reached the limits of my
knowledge and expertise and need some help going further. It would be nice
to find someone in the UK (or familiar with UK records and systems) and also
knowledgeable in helping adoptees find birth families.

She was born in Sheffield in 1965. She has submitted her DNA to all of the
major companies and is communicating with her matches (she matches a 3rd
cousin of mine but not me). Until she received her DNA results, she did not
know that she had Jewish ancestry. Ancestry DNA says that she is 19%
European Jewish, and the large majority of her DNA matches are Jewish. She
knows her birth mother is not Jewish.

If you would be willing to help her find her birth father and/or his family,
I will put you in touch with her. I am sure that with all your collective
wisdom and generosity, she will be able to make some progress in her quest.
Please respond privately to patbfuller@roadrunner.com.

Thanks so much!

Pat Redman Fuller
Simi Valley, California, USA

RESEARCHING: FAINBOIM Basarabeasca Moldova; KAPLITS Ukmerge Lithuania;
LEVITAN Kaliningrad Russia; LIPPMAN Taurage Lithuania; MUSS Ukmerge
Lithuania; NATHANSON Taurage Lithuania; RACHBUCH Husi and Hoceni Romania;
ROITMAN Carpineni Moldova; SHKOLNIK Hincesti Moldova


Theresienstadt location #austria-czech

danielat1@...
 

In reference to Carole Vogel=92s enquiry about a map of Theresienstadt there
is one in the new translation of the book by HG Adler published by Cambridge
Uni Press last year. If you look at the chapter on housing there is a mp of
the camp and Hauptstrasse is clearly indicated. So is the barracks number 9
but I cannot find the name of that barracks in the explanation of the map
opposite. Its indicated as building CIV only. >from memory (I've visited a
number of times) I think its opposite the SS headquarters where my mother
used to have to go to paint the officers as part of her job as an artist.
She told me she quaked every day crossing the park to that building.
There is a museum at the camp today and a Terezin institute for studies. I
suggest you ask them Carole.
Good luck.
Daniela Torsh
Sydney, Australia


Israel & his wife Rivka Fuchs #austria-czech

abrahamfuchs@...
 

Helo!
I'm looking for information on Israel & his wife Rivka Fuchs, that
lived in the Moravia area around 1830, parents of Bernat (Dov) Fuchs
from Senta.
Thanks,
Abraham


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Theresienstadt location #austria-czech

danielat1@...
 

In reference to Carole Vogel=92s enquiry about a map of Theresienstadt there
is one in the new translation of the book by HG Adler published by Cambridge
Uni Press last year. If you look at the chapter on housing there is a mp of
the camp and Hauptstrasse is clearly indicated. So is the barracks number 9
but I cannot find the name of that barracks in the explanation of the map
opposite. Its indicated as building CIV only. >from memory (I've visited a
number of times) I think its opposite the SS headquarters where my mother
used to have to go to paint the officers as part of her job as an artist.
She told me she quaked every day crossing the park to that building.
There is a museum at the camp today and a Terezin institute for studies. I
suggest you ask them Carole.
Good luck.
Daniela Torsh
Sydney, Australia


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Israel & his wife Rivka Fuchs #austria-czech

abrahamfuchs@...
 

Helo!
I'm looking for information on Israel & his wife Rivka Fuchs, that
lived in the Moravia area around 1830, parents of Bernat (Dov) Fuchs
from Senta.
Thanks,
Abraham


SCHLESINGER in TRAUTENAU-TRUTNOV #austria-czech

cyril.bielschowsky@...
 

Rafael-Raphael SCHLESINGER (>from Deutsch Krone, Prussia. Now Walcz,
Poland. Birth- and death- date ?) married to Marianne SELIG (Inowroclaw,
birth- and death- date ?).
In 1836, Rafael was Kaufmann in Inowroclaw. He is elected representative
in the jewish community in 1833. It seems that he was still in the
community board in 1871.

I know, at least, 2 children :
- Samuel SCHLESINGER (c. 1850, Inowroclaw). He married Theresia BONDY
(c. 1858) >from Trautenau, Austrian-hungarian Empire (Trutnov, Czech
Republic) and settled there.
- Mathilde SCHLESINGER (birthdate ?, Inowroclaw). She married Louis
ROMANN (15.08.1834, Kobylin, Posen, Prussia) and they settled too in
Trautenau.

Another SCHLESINGER, first name Johanna, married Mendal RADT (born c.
1822). Together, they had a daughter Kunigunde "Gunda" (05.10.1857,
Koschmin, Posen, Prussia). She married Max EYLENBURG (23.10.1843,
Pleschen, Posen, Prussia) and they settled also in Trautenau.
I know that Johanna was related to Samuel and Mathilde but HOW ?

Thank you, Cyril BIELSCHOWSKY


ViewMate translation request from German to English #austria-czech

danielat1@...
 

I've posted a vital record in German for which I would like to have a full
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64107
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Daniela Torsh
Sydney, Australia.
Researching POLLAK >from Vseradice, Morina and Prague


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech SCHLESINGER in TRAUTENAU-TRUTNOV #austria-czech

cyril.bielschowsky@...
 

Rafael-Raphael SCHLESINGER (>from Deutsch Krone, Prussia. Now Walcz,
Poland. Birth- and death- date ?) married to Marianne SELIG (Inowroclaw,
birth- and death- date ?).
In 1836, Rafael was Kaufmann in Inowroclaw. He is elected representative
in the jewish community in 1833. It seems that he was still in the
community board in 1871.

I know, at least, 2 children :
- Samuel SCHLESINGER (c. 1850, Inowroclaw). He married Theresia BONDY
(c. 1858) >from Trautenau, Austrian-hungarian Empire (Trutnov, Czech
Republic) and settled there.
- Mathilde SCHLESINGER (birthdate ?, Inowroclaw). She married Louis
ROMANN (15.08.1834, Kobylin, Posen, Prussia) and they settled too in
Trautenau.

Another SCHLESINGER, first name Johanna, married Mendal RADT (born c.
1822). Together, they had a daughter Kunigunde "Gunda" (05.10.1857,
Koschmin, Posen, Prussia). She married Max EYLENBURG (23.10.1843,
Pleschen, Posen, Prussia) and they settled also in Trautenau.
I know that Johanna was related to Samuel and Mathilde but HOW ?

Thank you, Cyril BIELSCHOWSKY


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech ViewMate translation request from German to English #austria-czech

danielat1@...
 

I've posted a vital record in German for which I would like to have a full
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64107
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
Daniela Torsh
Sydney, Australia.
Researching POLLAK >from Vseradice, Morina and Prague


Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) Meeting February 18 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society Meeting
Sunday, February 18 at 2 PM
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York NY

Program: "What You Can Learn >from Bubbe's Photos: Or, Jewish Clothing as
Cultural History"
Speaker: Professor Eric Silverman

What could be more mundane than clothing? Yet Old Jewish garments can
illustrate the complex social worlds in which Jews have always lived. For most
of Jewish history, clothing represented a tension between dressing Jewish and
dressing like everybody else. Clothing communicated messages about different
ways one could be Jewish in particular eras. This was especially true in the
late 19th and early 20th centuries, precisely when the ancestors of most
American Jews migrated to the United States. This talk, lavishly illustrated
with images, shows how we can read the clothing in old Jewish photos for clues
about the wider historical processes that shaped Jewish lives, aspirations, and
struggles.

Eric Silverman is Research Professor of Anthropology at Wheelock College,
Boston, and a Scholar at the Women's Studies Research Center at Brandeis
University. He studies the American Jewish experience, and also other cultures
worldwide, especially in Papua New Guinea. He has published widely and written
four books, including two connected to Jewish History: ">from Abraham to America:
A History of Jewish Circumcision" and "A Cultural History of Jewish Dress."

Free for members of JGS; guests welcome, $5 at the door.

More information available at our website: www.jgsny.org and on our Facebook page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) Meeting February 18 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society Meeting
Sunday, February 18 at 2 PM
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St. New York NY

Program: "What You Can Learn >from Bubbe's Photos: Or, Jewish Clothing as
Cultural History"
Speaker: Professor Eric Silverman

What could be more mundane than clothing? Yet Old Jewish garments can
illustrate the complex social worlds in which Jews have always lived. For most
of Jewish history, clothing represented a tension between dressing Jewish and
dressing like everybody else. Clothing communicated messages about different
ways one could be Jewish in particular eras. This was especially true in the
late 19th and early 20th centuries, precisely when the ancestors of most
American Jews migrated to the United States. This talk, lavishly illustrated
with images, shows how we can read the clothing in old Jewish photos for clues
about the wider historical processes that shaped Jewish lives, aspirations, and
struggles.

Eric Silverman is Research Professor of Anthropology at Wheelock College,
Boston, and a Scholar at the Women's Studies Research Center at Brandeis
University. He studies the American Jewish experience, and also other cultures
worldwide, especially in Papua New Guinea. He has published widely and written
four books, including two connected to Jewish History: ">from Abraham to America:
A History of Jewish Circumcision" and "A Cultural History of Jewish Dress."

Free for members of JGS; guests welcome, $5 at the door.

More information available at our website: www.jgsny.org and on our Facebook page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York NY


Viewmate translation request #ukraine

Marilyn Levinson
 

I have posted a few words found on the back of a photograph of a family member I am trying to identify.
Could you please translate these words. It is on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64120.

Please respond via the form provided in the
View mate application.
Thank you very much.
Marilyn Levinson


Revotsk and Kovorsk, Ukraine #ukraine

Perry Garsombke <garfather99@...>
 

I have seen 'Revotsk' and 'Kovorsk' as "last residence" on several
Petitions for Naturalization, but can not find either on any maps or
lists of towns on Jewishgen or elsewhere. I think they may be in the
Ukraine. Does anyone know where they are or were??
Thank you!!


--
Perry Garsombke

42001 - 42020 of 656639