Date   

Gustav HERGERSHAUSEN - Lkeipzig #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I am searching for Gustav Hergershausen. He was Born 13-Feb-1880 in
Luenern a part of Unna.

He lived in Leipzig Eutritzscher Str. 43 II right.

I haven't found someting in the Gedenkbuch and yad Vashem.

Could anyone help to find him?

Regards, Mike Redel Unna - Germany


German SIG #Germany Gustav HERGERSHAUSEN - Lkeipzig #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

I am searching for Gustav Hergershausen. He was Born 13-Feb-1880 in
Luenern a part of Unna.

He lived in Leipzig Eutritzscher Str. 43 II right.

I haven't found someting in the Gedenkbuch and yad Vashem.

Could anyone help to find him?

Regards, Mike Redel Unna - Germany


Project item: Ellrich #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

Since some of you may not be at all familiar with the sources of the
records we're indexing, I'm going to propose some individual items that
one or more people can work on.

Here's the first one:

Ellrich (Saxony) Family Register

One pair of pages per family. About 70 families.

Indexing involves noting the image and page numbers, then surname, given
and maiden names for each person; place of origin if given; role (Head
of household, wife, etc.); years of birth, marriage, death. Since we
hope to link to the images, we don't need every last detail for an index.

Handwriting is Roman cursive, generally with excellent penmanship. Any
bits in German script are either irrelevant or can be learned in 5
minutes--basically the words for "son," "daughter," etc. And you're
welcome to highlight any cells where you're not sure what to put in.

I've done the first 15 families, so there will be plenty of examples to
check.

The only trick: the records are in a strange order: all the left-hand
pages, followed by the right-hand pages in reverse order. Fortunately,
the right-hand pages contain only the dates of death and burial (we're
not indexing the latter) plus any remarks (also not to be indexed). So
it's entirely feasible to do the left-hand pages first, then add the
last column (plus image number).

Who wants to try? If you do 5 families a day, you'll be done in a little
over a week.

Thanks in advance, Roger Lustig, GerSIG Research Director


German SIG #Germany Project item: Ellrich #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

Since some of you may not be at all familiar with the sources of the
records we're indexing, I'm going to propose some individual items that
one or more people can work on.

Here's the first one:

Ellrich (Saxony) Family Register

One pair of pages per family. About 70 families.

Indexing involves noting the image and page numbers, then surname, given
and maiden names for each person; place of origin if given; role (Head
of household, wife, etc.); years of birth, marriage, death. Since we
hope to link to the images, we don't need every last detail for an index.

Handwriting is Roman cursive, generally with excellent penmanship. Any
bits in German script are either irrelevant or can be learned in 5
minutes--basically the words for "son," "daughter," etc. And you're
welcome to highlight any cells where you're not sure what to put in.

I've done the first 15 families, so there will be plenty of examples to
check.

The only trick: the records are in a strange order: all the left-hand
pages, followed by the right-hand pages in reverse order. Fortunately,
the right-hand pages contain only the dates of death and burial (we're
not indexing the latter) plus any remarks (also not to be indexed). So
it's entirely feasible to do the left-hand pages first, then add the
last column (plus image number).

Who wants to try? If you do 5 families a day, you'll be done in a little
over a week.

Thanks in advance, Roger Lustig, GerSIG Research Director


ViewMate SPITZ/WILDE wedding 1918 Breslau/Wroclaw #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

I've posted one more image on ViewMate, at this URL:


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM68430

I only need help with the underlined portions; I've managed to read the rest. It's >from a poem for Martha SPITZ' marriage to Rabbi Georg WILDE in 1918. He'd already been Rabbi of Magdeburg since 1906, and was nearly finished with his service in the German Army in WWI, for which he was awarded an Iron Cross 2nd Class, and a Wuerttemberg decoration as well. He continued as Rabbi until Reichspogromnacht & was able to flee, with his wife to England.

Thanks in advance!
Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI 96753


German SIG #Germany ViewMate SPITZ/WILDE wedding 1918 Breslau/Wroclaw #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

I've posted one more image on ViewMate, at this URL:


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM68430

I only need help with the underlined portions; I've managed to read the rest. It's >from a poem for Martha SPITZ' marriage to Rabbi Georg WILDE in 1918. He'd already been Rabbi of Magdeburg since 1906, and was nearly finished with his service in the German Army in WWI, for which he was awarded an Iron Cross 2nd Class, and a Wuerttemberg decoration as well. He continued as Rabbi until Reichspogromnacht & was able to flee, with his wife to England.

Thanks in advance!
Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI 96753


One more project: Westphalia #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

When it comes to indexing Jewish records >from Germany, we are not alone!
This is a very good thing, given the overwhelming amount of recorded
information about German Jews has come down to us. Allow me to introduce
Projekt JuWeL, which seeks to index all of the Westphalian and
Lippe-Detmold Jewish and Dissident (Quakers, Baptists and other minority
churches) records for the period 1815-1875 that are found in the state
archive in Detmold. At least 95% of these are Jewish.

Projekt JuWeL (the acronym means "jewel") is a collaborative effort of
three organizations:

1) The North-Rhine-Westphalian State Archives;

2) the Verein fuer Computergenealogie (society for computer genealogy),
aka CompGen;

3) the Westfaelische Gesellschaft fuer Genealogie und Familienforschung
(Westphalian society for genealogy and family research).

This project has been mentioned here on the GerSIG at least once since
its inception over a year ago, but it deserves another exposure.

http://vereine.genealogy.net/wggf/?Die_WGGF:Projekt_JuWeL describes the
project. The link just below the title gets you to the project home page.

Work is proceeding nicely. Of the three regions that the archive has
records for, Muenster (west) is complete; Arnsberg (central) is being
done now, and Paderborn (east, incl. Lippe) is yet to come. The database
crossed the 50,000 record mark 2 months ago, and the results are already
searchable: http://des.genealogy.net/juwel/search/index

JuWeL uses the DES data-entry system that CompGen developed.
http://docs.genealogy.net/des/en/ is an English-language introduction to
it. I have found it easy and relatively intuitive to use.

Please visit the links I've posted and see how indexing work is being
done. And feel free to sign up and index!

Roger Lustig,  Princeton, NJ USA, research coordinator, GerSIG


German SIG #Germany One more project: Westphalia #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

When it comes to indexing Jewish records >from Germany, we are not alone!
This is a very good thing, given the overwhelming amount of recorded
information about German Jews has come down to us. Allow me to introduce
Projekt JuWeL, which seeks to index all of the Westphalian and
Lippe-Detmold Jewish and Dissident (Quakers, Baptists and other minority
churches) records for the period 1815-1875 that are found in the state
archive in Detmold. At least 95% of these are Jewish.

Projekt JuWeL (the acronym means "jewel") is a collaborative effort of
three organizations:

1) The North-Rhine-Westphalian State Archives;

2) the Verein fuer Computergenealogie (society for computer genealogy),
aka CompGen;

3) the Westfaelische Gesellschaft fuer Genealogie und Familienforschung
(Westphalian society for genealogy and family research).

This project has been mentioned here on the GerSIG at least once since
its inception over a year ago, but it deserves another exposure.

http://vereine.genealogy.net/wggf/?Die_WGGF:Projekt_JuWeL describes the
project. The link just below the title gets you to the project home page.

Work is proceeding nicely. Of the three regions that the archive has
records for, Muenster (west) is complete; Arnsberg (central) is being
done now, and Paderborn (east, incl. Lippe) is yet to come. The database
crossed the 50,000 record mark 2 months ago, and the results are already
searchable: http://des.genealogy.net/juwel/search/index

JuWeL uses the DES data-entry system that CompGen developed.
http://docs.genealogy.net/des/en/ is an English-language introduction to
it. I have found it easy and relatively intuitive to use.

Please visit the links I've posted and see how indexing work is being
done. And feel free to sign up and index!

Roger Lustig,  Princeton, NJ USA, research coordinator, GerSIG


Emil MARCUS from Unna #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

Emil Marcus was born 18.02.1873 in Unna to Simon and Elise Cohn. He
married Selma (Name unknown). Both had the following Children: Walter,
Gertrud and Kaethe Loewenthal born Marcus.

I don't know nothing about Walter and Gertrud.

Emil lived in the Reichskristallnacht in Unna. Emil and Selma try to
live in Berlin Hotel Europa. They didn't arrived in Berlin. There is
no entry in the Gedenkbuch, yad vashem and the Zamosclist

Could anyone help to find him? Regards,
Mike Redel Unna - Germany


Project No. 3 (Wuerttemberg): an update #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

The Wuerttemberg family-register indexing project is well underway! As I
mentioned before, you don't need to read ugly old German script to be of
assistance here, so come and volunteer.

Since my last posting, I've noticed that ancestry.com has in fact done
an indexing project of its own that deals with Wuerttemberg family
registers. I believe our project is even more important as a result, for
several reasons.

a) The ancestry.com index does not include mention of a person's religion.

b) It is by no means complete, and sometimes includes town records,
sometimes those for a single church. Only 12 of the ca. 75 communities
in our project are represented there at all, and entries for those 12
may or may not include Jewish records.

c) whoever organized it has a very poor grasp of political geography.
For instance: the rubric "Oa," meaning "Oberamt" (an older word for
"Kreis") becomes the town of "Oa" that pops up all over the Kingdom.
This is like saying your Russian ancestors came >from Gubernia.
Similarly, the town of Weil im Dorf becomes "im Dorf u. Weil," i.e., two
places, one of them a prepositional phrase.

Now, the quality of the ancestry.com registers is excellent, and, once
our index is in place, it may be advisable to use those to glean all the
information that the registrars in their day were able to report on one
page. I recommend using them, but I would not be confident in any
results of their indexing.

I'm also not sure exactly which registers were preserved on the
familysearch.org films used for the ancestry transcriptions. As far as I
know, there are no Jewish-only registers beyond those preserved in the
Gatermann films.

As ever, all comments, queries and amplifications are welcome.

Roger Lustig  Princeton, NJ USA  research coordinator, GerSIG


German SIG #Germany Emil MARCUS from Unna #germany

Mike Redel <redel.mike@...>
 

Dear gersigs,

Emil Marcus was born 18.02.1873 in Unna to Simon and Elise Cohn. He
married Selma (Name unknown). Both had the following Children: Walter,
Gertrud and Kaethe Loewenthal born Marcus.

I don't know nothing about Walter and Gertrud.

Emil lived in the Reichskristallnacht in Unna. Emil and Selma try to
live in Berlin Hotel Europa. They didn't arrived in Berlin. There is
no entry in the Gedenkbuch, yad vashem and the Zamosclist

Could anyone help to find him? Regards,
Mike Redel Unna - Germany


German SIG #Germany Project No. 3 (Wuerttemberg): an update #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear all:

The Wuerttemberg family-register indexing project is well underway! As I
mentioned before, you don't need to read ugly old German script to be of
assistance here, so come and volunteer.

Since my last posting, I've noticed that ancestry.com has in fact done
an indexing project of its own that deals with Wuerttemberg family
registers. I believe our project is even more important as a result, for
several reasons.

a) The ancestry.com index does not include mention of a person's religion.

b) It is by no means complete, and sometimes includes town records,
sometimes those for a single church. Only 12 of the ca. 75 communities
in our project are represented there at all, and entries for those 12
may or may not include Jewish records.

c) whoever organized it has a very poor grasp of political geography.
For instance: the rubric "Oa," meaning "Oberamt" (an older word for
"Kreis") becomes the town of "Oa" that pops up all over the Kingdom.
This is like saying your Russian ancestors came >from Gubernia.
Similarly, the town of Weil im Dorf becomes "im Dorf u. Weil," i.e., two
places, one of them a prepositional phrase.

Now, the quality of the ancestry.com registers is excellent, and, once
our index is in place, it may be advisable to use those to glean all the
information that the registrars in their day were able to report on one
page. I recommend using them, but I would not be confident in any
results of their indexing.

I'm also not sure exactly which registers were preserved on the
familysearch.org films used for the ancestry transcriptions. As far as I
know, there are no Jewish-only registers beyond those preserved in the
Gatermann films.

As ever, all comments, queries and amplifications are welcome.

Roger Lustig  Princeton, NJ USA  research coordinator, GerSIG


Re: Researching family direct maternal ancestor Simon BRIE (1813-1881) from Rawitsch, Posen. of #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Raphael,

I am not sure whether as a first step you checked the Memorial Book of
the German Federal Archives:

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.de?result#frmResults

It has at least six entries with the BRIE surname and connection to
Posen, and one with the birthplace Rawitsch

perhaps it helps?

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany

Am 01.07.2018 um 05:09 schrieb Raphael Thurm littletalmid@...:

Hello,
I am researching the family of my direct maternal ancestor Simon BRIE
(1813-1881) >from Rawitsch, Posen. Does anyone have any information
regarding this family?


German SIG #Germany Re: Researching family direct maternal ancestor Simon BRIE (1813-1881) from Rawitsch, Posen. of #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Raphael,

I am not sure whether as a first step you checked the Memorial Book of
the German Federal Archives:

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html.de?result#frmResults

It has at least six entries with the BRIE surname and connection to
Posen, and one with the birthplace Rawitsch

perhaps it helps?

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany

Am 01.07.2018 um 05:09 schrieb Raphael Thurm littletalmid@...:

Hello,
I am researching the family of my direct maternal ancestor Simon BRIE
(1813-1881) >from Rawitsch, Posen. Does anyone have any information
regarding this family?


Parnas in Nesvizh #belarus

Lisa Liel
 

I'm trying to track down a parnas in Nesvizh in the 1800s. A parnas was
a wealthy member of a community who took many of the community's
financial burdens upon himself.  Are there any sources for these
people? The one I'm looking for was named something like Milevsky.

Thanks,
Lisa Liel


Belarus SIG #Belarus Parnas in Nesvizh #belarus

Lisa Liel
 

I'm trying to track down a parnas in Nesvizh in the 1800s. A parnas was
a wealthy member of a community who took many of the community's
financial burdens upon himself.  Are there any sources for these
people? The one I'm looking for was named something like Milevsky.

Thanks,
Lisa Liel


Yizkor Book Project, June 2018 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

In general, I begin my monthly Yizkor Book Project report with writing
how impressed I am over the achievements we've managed to accomplish over
the past month. This time, however, I leave it to you to decide for
yourself about the scale of achievements we've made in both quantity and
quality in June, and I believe you'll come to the same conclusion as
myself.

Once again, I have the wonderful news to convey to you that a further
Yizkor book translation project is now entirely online. This time it is
the Chorzele, Poland Yizkor book - the "Memorial Book of the Community
of Chorzel" which was coordinated and financially supported by Susan
Huntting. We are truly indebted to her for leading the project through
to its successful completion.

As far as new projects go, we have added in three pdf files, kindly
provided by the Yizkor Book in Print Project of books they have published
through their auspices. As with all our online translations and books,
access to these are without charge but, of course, if you interested in
purchasing one of these published books, please see details of how to
obtain them in the YBIP Project page, listed at the end of this report.

We have also been fortunate in June, in receiving access to another
online book by Meir G. Gover - this time on the "Radzyner Rebbe dynasty
1840-2005". We do thank Meir for making this book available and I feel
sure will be of interest to those of you with roots in Radzyn Podlaski,
Poland.

In this past month, a number of Translation Fund projects have been set
up to obtain financial support of people with the same aim - achieving
the English translation of the Yizkor book about the community they hold
dear to their heart. As I so often note, the Yizkor books contain so much
for us in details of the communities and the people in them - details
which are unavailable in any other source.

The translation funds that have recently been setup are for the books on
Turobin, Poland and Svencionys, Lithuania and your support for any of
these funds will greatly assist in achieving the goal of completely
translating these books. I invite you to visit our JewishGen-erosity
page, listed at the end of this report, where all our Translation Funds
appear and welcome your donations, be they large or small, to see the
translations of the books become a reality.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in June.

We have added in three new books:

- God's Sabbatical Years (The Story of Alan Weiler)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/SabbaticalYears/SabbaticalYears.html

- My Journey to Freedom (Kybartai to Haifa)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JourneyToFreedom/JourneyToFreedom.html

- The Maple Tree Behind the Barbed Wire (A Story of Survival >from the
Czestochowa Ghetto)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MapleTree/MapleTree.html


We have added in 7 new entries:

- Birzai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_026.html

- Kaisiadorys, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_070.html

- Lygumai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_257.html

- Stakliskes, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_479.html

- Sudargas, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_492.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of Volomin)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wolomin/Wolominh.html [Hebrew]

- Zeimelis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_680.html

And we have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Bukovina (Region), Romania/Ukraine (History of the Jews in the Bukovina)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Chorzele, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Chorzel)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Chorzele/Chorzele.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of
Dubno, Wolyn) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Karczew & Otwock, Poland (Summoned >from the Ashes)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Karczew/Karczew.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lowicz/lowicz.html

- Makow Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of the community of Makow
Mazowiecki)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Makow_Mazowiecki/Makow_Mazowiecki.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the ruins
of an annihilated Jewish community)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Rowno, Wolyn) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish
community) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wadowice, Poland (Memorial Book of the Communities Wadowice,
ndrychow, Kalwarja, Myslenice, Sucha)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wadowice/wadowice.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L
(Zofyuvka and Ignatovka)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Belarus SIG #Belarus Yizkor Book Project, June 2018 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

In general, I begin my monthly Yizkor Book Project report with writing
how impressed I am over the achievements we've managed to accomplish over
the past month. This time, however, I leave it to you to decide for
yourself about the scale of achievements we've made in both quantity and
quality in June, and I believe you'll come to the same conclusion as
myself.

Once again, I have the wonderful news to convey to you that a further
Yizkor book translation project is now entirely online. This time it is
the Chorzele, Poland Yizkor book - the "Memorial Book of the Community
of Chorzel" which was coordinated and financially supported by Susan
Huntting. We are truly indebted to her for leading the project through
to its successful completion.

As far as new projects go, we have added in three pdf files, kindly
provided by the Yizkor Book in Print Project of books they have published
through their auspices. As with all our online translations and books,
access to these are without charge but, of course, if you interested in
purchasing one of these published books, please see details of how to
obtain them in the YBIP Project page, listed at the end of this report.

We have also been fortunate in June, in receiving access to another
online book by Meir G. Gover - this time on the "Radzyner Rebbe dynasty
1840-2005". We do thank Meir for making this book available and I feel
sure will be of interest to those of you with roots in Radzyn Podlaski,
Poland.

In this past month, a number of Translation Fund projects have been set
up to obtain financial support of people with the same aim - achieving
the English translation of the Yizkor book about the community they hold
dear to their heart. As I so often note, the Yizkor books contain so much
for us in details of the communities and the people in them - details
which are unavailable in any other source.

The translation funds that have recently been setup are for the books on
Turobin, Poland and Svencionys, Lithuania and your support for any of
these funds will greatly assist in achieving the goal of completely
translating these books. I invite you to visit our JewishGen-erosity
page, listed at the end of this report, where all our Translation Funds
appear and welcome your donations, be they large or small, to see the
translations of the books become a reality.

And now for details of all the updates and additions that were carried
out in the Yizkor Book Project in June.

We have added in three new books:

- God's Sabbatical Years (The Story of Alan Weiler)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/SabbaticalYears/SabbaticalYears.html

- My Journey to Freedom (Kybartai to Haifa)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/JourneyToFreedom/JourneyToFreedom.html

- The Maple Tree Behind the Barbed Wire (A Story of Survival >from the
Czestochowa Ghetto)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/MapleTree/MapleTree.html


We have added in 7 new entries:

- Birzai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_026.html

- Kaisiadorys, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_070.html

- Lygumai, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_257.html

- Stakliskes, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_479.html

- Sudargas, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_492.html

- Wolomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of Volomin)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wolomin/Wolominh.html [Hebrew]

- Zeimelis, Lithuania (Preserving Our Litvak Heritage - Volume I)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lithuania4/lit4_680.html

And we have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Bukovina (Region), Romania/Ukraine (History of the Jews in the Bukovina)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bukowinabook/bukowina.html

- Capresti, Moldova (Kapresht, our village; memorial book for the Jewish
community of Kapresht, Bessarabia)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Capresti/Capresti.html

- Chorzele, Poland (Memorial Book of the Community of Chorzel)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Chorzele/Chorzele.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew-Osada, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a Memorial to the Jewish community of
Dubno, Wolyn) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dubno/dubno.html

- Dynow, Poland (The Memorial Book of Jewish Dinov)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dynow1/dynow1.html

- Jonava, Lithuania (Jonava On the Banks of the Vylia; In memory of
the destroyed Jewish community of Jonava)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html

- Karczew & Otwock, Poland (Summoned >from the Ashes)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Karczew/Karczew.html

- Kolki, Ukraine (Summoned >from the Ashes)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolki/kolki.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Lowicz, Poland (Lowicz; a Town in Mazovia, Memorial Book)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lowicz/lowicz.html

- Makow Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of the community of Makow
Mazowiecki)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Makow_Mazowiecki/Makow_Mazowiecki.html

- Miechow, Charsznica & Ksiaz, Poland (Miechov Memorial Book,
Charsznica and Ksiaz)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miechow/Miechow.html

- Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland (Mezritsh Book, in Memory of the Martyrs
of our City)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski/Miedzyrzec_Podlaski.html

- Monor, Hungary (Bound by Fate: In Memory of the Jewish Community of
Monor) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Monor/Monor.html

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the ruins
of an annihilated Jewish community)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Rivne, Ukraine (Rowno; a memorial to the Jewish community of
Rowno, Wolyn) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/rovno/rovno.html

- Smarhon, Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Turobin, Poland (The Turobin book; in memory of the Jewish
community) https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Turobin/Turobin.html

- Wadowice, Poland (Memorial Book of the Communities Wadowice,
ndrychow, Kalwarja, Myslenice, Sucha)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/wadowice/wadowice.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L
(Zofyuvka and Ignatovka)
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Information on South African Landsmanshaften #courland #latvia

Eli Rabinowitz
 

We are appealing for information, any publications or articles on SOUTH AFRICAN
LANDSMANSHAFTEN (ASSOCIATIONS) (AKA Sick and Benefit Societies/ Mutual Aid
Societies).

In South Africa in the early 1900s in there were many Mutual Aid Societies/
Associations/Landsmanshaften >from mainly Lithuanian towns including: Aniksht,
Birzh, Chelm ( Poland), Dvinsk (Latvia), Keidan, Kelme, Kovno, Krakinowo, Kroze,
Kupishok, Kurland (Latvia), Lutzin, Malat, Minsk (Belarus), Ponevez, Poswohl,
Plungyan, Rakishok, Riga (Latvia), Shavlan, Shavl, Shater, Tels, Utiyan, Vilna
and Zhagar.

To help one another and the new immigrants arriving with virtually nothing,
Landsleit (people >from the same towns or districts) banded together to form
Landsmanshaften (Mutual Aid Societies) that helped the sick and poor, buried the
dead and provided interest free loans to help members start businesses. They
also provided a place where the community of mainly men 'greeners' could gather
and socialise.

David Sandler's next compilation will be SOUTH AFRICAN LANDSMANSHAFTEN (Jewish
Sick and Benefit Societies / Associations of the early 20th century). While he
has published booklets on Keidan and Krakenowo and has booklets on Ponevez and
Malat, we are looking for information and any other publications of these
Landsleit or any others >from South Africa. Also, we are seeking publications of
any Jewish Communities in Johannesburg.

If anyone can help, please contact:

David Solly Sandler sedsand@...

or

Eli Rabinowitz @elirab

Perth, Australia


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Information on South African Landsmanshaften #courland #latvia

Eli Rabinowitz
 

We are appealing for information, any publications or articles on SOUTH AFRICAN
LANDSMANSHAFTEN (ASSOCIATIONS) (AKA Sick and Benefit Societies/ Mutual Aid
Societies).

In South Africa in the early 1900s in there were many Mutual Aid Societies/
Associations/Landsmanshaften >from mainly Lithuanian towns including: Aniksht,
Birzh, Chelm ( Poland), Dvinsk (Latvia), Keidan, Kelme, Kovno, Krakinowo, Kroze,
Kupishok, Kurland (Latvia), Lutzin, Malat, Minsk (Belarus), Ponevez, Poswohl,
Plungyan, Rakishok, Riga (Latvia), Shavlan, Shavl, Shater, Tels, Utiyan, Vilna
and Zhagar.

To help one another and the new immigrants arriving with virtually nothing,
Landsleit (people >from the same towns or districts) banded together to form
Landsmanshaften (Mutual Aid Societies) that helped the sick and poor, buried the
dead and provided interest free loans to help members start businesses. They
also provided a place where the community of mainly men 'greeners' could gather
and socialise.

David Sandler's next compilation will be SOUTH AFRICAN LANDSMANSHAFTEN (Jewish
Sick and Benefit Societies / Associations of the early 20th century). While he
has published booklets on Keidan and Krakenowo and has booklets on Ponevez and
Malat, we are looking for information and any other publications of these
Landsleit or any others >from South Africa. Also, we are seeking publications of
any Jewish Communities in Johannesburg.

If anyone can help, please contact:

David Solly Sandler sedsand@...

or

Eli Rabinowitz @elirab

Perth, Australia