Date   

Comments on the Timing of Birth Registrations in Polish Vital Records #poland

David Ferleger
 

What a great and timely question. I am sure others are more versed
than me in this, BUT I spent Saturday evening with a Holocaust Survivor,
early 80s, who's known me >from birth. He's a close family friend.

In response to my describing finding birth dates/information, he said
that:
1. Registrations are not necessarily accurate.

2. In small towns, Jews often went and registered births officially
in batches, with more than one at a time,
and not necessarily at the actual date of the birth.

On the other hand, someone has given me family history information
based on memories and oral data >from various relatives over the years,
and some of it conflicts substantially with the birth/marriage/death
town data. In that case, I am more likely to accept the 'official'
recorded data as closer to reality.

Sadly, we'll never really know a lot of this.

David Ferleger


JRI Poland #Poland Comments on the Timing of Birth Registrations in Polish Vital Records #poland

David Ferleger
 

What a great and timely question. I am sure others are more versed
than me in this, BUT I spent Saturday evening with a Holocaust Survivor,
early 80s, who's known me >from birth. He's a close family friend.

In response to my describing finding birth dates/information, he said
that:
1. Registrations are not necessarily accurate.

2. In small towns, Jews often went and registered births officially
in batches, with more than one at a time,
and not necessarily at the actual date of the birth.

On the other hand, someone has given me family history information
based on memories and oral data >from various relatives over the years,
and some of it conflicts substantially with the birth/marriage/death
town data. In that case, I am more likely to accept the 'official'
recorded data as closer to reality.

Sadly, we'll never really know a lot of this.

David Ferleger


Cesky Krumlov #austria-czech

DKBern@...
 

Hello Austria-Czech SIG Friends:

For those with ancestors >from Cesky Krumlov, or those planning a visit, there
is on the internet a wonderful click-sensitive map of the town. Copy and
paste this into your browser and use the mouse to wander around. Click on the
Castle and most of the houses for their detailed history.

http://www.ckrumlov.cz/uk/atlas/i_cmm.htm
[German and Czech versions also]

Enjoy the tour!

Dave Bernard, in snow white Massachusetts

PS -- More on the castle, town and region can be found at:
http://www.ckrumlov.cz/

MODERATOR NOTE: the site Dave quotes can also be found via:
www.tinyurl.com/84ens


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Cesky Krumlov #austria-czech

DKBern@...
 

Hello Austria-Czech SIG Friends:

For those with ancestors >from Cesky Krumlov, or those planning a visit, there
is on the internet a wonderful click-sensitive map of the town. Copy and
paste this into your browser and use the mouse to wander around. Click on the
Castle and most of the houses for their detailed history.

http://www.ckrumlov.cz/uk/atlas/i_cmm.htm
[German and Czech versions also]

Enjoy the tour!

Dave Bernard, in snow white Massachusetts

PS -- More on the castle, town and region can be found at:
http://www.ckrumlov.cz/

MODERATOR NOTE: the site Dave quotes can also be found via:
www.tinyurl.com/84ens


SQUARENINA - Hebrew typesetter in Vienna #austria-czech

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear friends,

My g-g-g-g-grandfather, Michael SQUARENINA (1774-1870), born and buried in
Nadasch [1],was a Hebrew typesetter, and worked for the famous printer
Anton Edler von Schmid in Pressburg (Bratislava, Slovakia) and in Vienna.

During his 96 years he lived in small villages near Pressburg, probably also
in Pressburg it self, and around 1866-1870 (or maybe even earlier) he lived in
Vienna. I don't know where he died, but he was buried in Nadasch.

He was known by the names NADASCH and SQUARENINA, but his father's surname
was PETERSELKA. some of his descendants were named SQUARENINA, while others
were named DUSCHINSKY. (all these names have spelling variants)

I recently got a report by a relative who wrote, in 1957:
"Michael was a master printer and he produced the first Hebrew Sidurim
(prayer books) known to be printed in the Austrian Empire. Speciments of
his craftsmanship, dating back to the late 18th century, and bearing his
imprint, were amongst the treasures of the library of Leipzig
(Bibliographische Institut)...."
(The end of this paragraph is missing)

I don't know if indeed it was the first prayer book which were printed in
the Austrian Empire, but still, I'm interested to know were I can find
copies of his work.

I serached the internet for Leipzig libraries, but with lack of German
language, was unable to find a book catalogue.

I can think of the following institutions as those which might have a copy
of books:
- Vienna city library
- Vienna Jewish museum ( http://www.jmw.at/en/archives.html )
- Vienna Jewish community library

Does anyone knows where else I might look for the books (besides Israeli
universities), or has a link to the catalogue (or even mailing address)
of the Leipzig Bibliographische Institut ?

Any info regarding the SQUARENINA( SKWARENIM, etc..), PETERSELKA (PETRZELKI,
etc.) and DUSCHINSKY families will also be most appreciated.

Thank you very much!

Tomer Brunner - Natanya & Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Remark:
[1] Nadasch - small village located near Bratislava, Slovakia.
Slovak name: Trstin , Hungarian name: Nadas.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech SQUARENINA - Hebrew typesetter in Vienna #austria-czech

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear friends,

My g-g-g-g-grandfather, Michael SQUARENINA (1774-1870), born and buried in
Nadasch [1],was a Hebrew typesetter, and worked for the famous printer
Anton Edler von Schmid in Pressburg (Bratislava, Slovakia) and in Vienna.

During his 96 years he lived in small villages near Pressburg, probably also
in Pressburg it self, and around 1866-1870 (or maybe even earlier) he lived in
Vienna. I don't know where he died, but he was buried in Nadasch.

He was known by the names NADASCH and SQUARENINA, but his father's surname
was PETERSELKA. some of his descendants were named SQUARENINA, while others
were named DUSCHINSKY. (all these names have spelling variants)

I recently got a report by a relative who wrote, in 1957:
"Michael was a master printer and he produced the first Hebrew Sidurim
(prayer books) known to be printed in the Austrian Empire. Speciments of
his craftsmanship, dating back to the late 18th century, and bearing his
imprint, were amongst the treasures of the library of Leipzig
(Bibliographische Institut)...."
(The end of this paragraph is missing)

I don't know if indeed it was the first prayer book which were printed in
the Austrian Empire, but still, I'm interested to know were I can find
copies of his work.

I serached the internet for Leipzig libraries, but with lack of German
language, was unable to find a book catalogue.

I can think of the following institutions as those which might have a copy
of books:
- Vienna city library
- Vienna Jewish museum ( http://www.jmw.at/en/archives.html )
- Vienna Jewish community library

Does anyone knows where else I might look for the books (besides Israeli
universities), or has a link to the catalogue (or even mailing address)
of the Leipzig Bibliographische Institut ?

Any info regarding the SQUARENINA( SKWARENIM, etc..), PETERSELKA (PETRZELKI,
etc.) and DUSCHINSKY families will also be most appreciated.

Thank you very much!

Tomer Brunner - Natanya & Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Remark:
[1] Nadasch - small village located near Bratislava, Slovakia.
Slovak name: Trstin , Hungarian name: Nadas.


Re: witness information - Thank You! #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hans-martinunger@...>
 

Thanks to all about " witness ". Thanks for your helps. Kind regards

Hansmartin Unger St. Gallen, Switzerland


German SIG #Germany Re: witness information - Thank You! #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hans-martinunger@...>
 

Thanks to all about " witness ". Thanks for your helps. Kind regards

Hansmartin Unger St. Gallen, Switzerland


BOOK CITE -Re: Lecture on the WARBURG Family #germany

GSt <beagun27@...>
 

For those who are interested but cannot attend, let me recommend
Ron CHERNOW's book " The WARBURGS", Random House , 1993 ISBN0-679-41823-7.
It commences with Simon, >from Kassel, (~1566), one of my ancestors of
the RUBENSOHN family.

Gunther Steinberg Portola Valley CA <mailto:beagun27@comcast.net>


German SIG #Germany BOOK CITE -Re: Lecture on the WARBURG Family #germany

GSt <beagun27@...>
 

For those who are interested but cannot attend, let me recommend
Ron CHERNOW's book " The WARBURGS", Random House , 1993 ISBN0-679-41823-7.
It commences with Simon, >from Kassel, (~1566), one of my ancestors of
the RUBENSOHN family.

Gunther Steinberg Portola Valley CA <mailto:beagun27@comcast.net>


Re: Slobodka Yeshiva Pictures #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

On 2005.12.06, Todd Brody <tbrody10@yahoo.com> asked:

> I.. am looking for the annual pictures >from the Slobodka Yeshiva
> where my grandfather and greatuncle attended. The years that I am
> lookingfor are the mid to late 20s through the move to Hebron. YIVO
> has the 1922 and 1937 photos. But if you know of sources for any of
> the other photographs, I would be greatly appreciative.

In 2002 Feldheim in Jerusalem published the Hebrew book "Hamashgiach
R' Meir" a biography of R' Meir Chadash, the Mashgiach of the Chevron
Yeshivah, written by his daughter Rebbetsen Shulamit Mizrachi.

In effect this work is a history of Slabodka/Chevron which includes
many photographs of the desired era.

Leslie Reich (a one time pupil of the saintly R' Meir)


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Slobodka Yeshiva Pictures #rabbinic

Mr L Reich <lreich@...>
 

On 2005.12.06, Todd Brody <tbrody10@yahoo.com> asked:

> I.. am looking for the annual pictures >from the Slobodka Yeshiva
> where my grandfather and greatuncle attended. The years that I am
> lookingfor are the mid to late 20s through the move to Hebron. YIVO
> has the 1922 and 1937 photos. But if you know of sources for any of
> the other photographs, I would be greatly appreciative.

In 2002 Feldheim in Jerusalem published the Hebrew book "Hamashgiach
R' Meir" a biography of R' Meir Chadash, the Mashgiach of the Chevron
Yeshivah, written by his daughter Rebbetsen Shulamit Mizrachi.

In effect this work is a history of Slabodka/Chevron which includes
many photographs of the desired era.

Leslie Reich (a one time pupil of the saintly R' Meir)


Good government search engines for the U.S. Military #belarus

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

Dear Geners,

I wanted to list a few good government sites for the
U.S. for those people who did not know about them.

This first one will give you information about anyone
buried in a national cemetery. And you can use partial
names.

www.cem.va.gov Then click "Nationwide Gravesite
locator"

This second one was published a while ago. But it
seems they have changed the Web page, and added a
Basic and Advanced search engine that will go through
all the data bases at once. I don't remember this
before. Or the Link has now changed for the better.

aad.archives.gov/aad/index.jsp

Happy hunting,
Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Good government search engines for the U.S. Military #belarus

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

Dear Geners,

I wanted to list a few good government sites for the
U.S. for those people who did not know about them.

This first one will give you information about anyone
buried in a national cemetery. And you can use partial
names.

www.cem.va.gov Then click "Nationwide Gravesite
locator"

This second one was published a while ago. But it
seems they have changed the Web page, and added a
Basic and Advanced search engine that will go through
all the data bases at once. I don't remember this
before. Or the Link has now changed for the better.

aad.archives.gov/aad/index.jsp

Happy hunting,
Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


Additional funds needed for "Holocaust in Belarus" translation #belarus

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

The English translation of "Holocaust in Belarus" , Dr. Leonid Smilovitsky's
important work on the holocaust in Belarus, is progressing nicely. However,
the kitty containing donations is getting low, and more will be needed to
complete the job.

Dr. Smilovitsky should be well-known to Belarus SIG members, as he
generously & frequently donates articles to the SIG Newsletter.

Please donate to this project via the Jewishgen-erosity page:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

"Holocaust in Belarus" is the 9th project down the alphabetical list.

Thanks!
Irene Newhouse
Co-ordinator


Belarus SIG #Belarus Additional funds needed for "Holocaust in Belarus" translation #belarus

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

The English translation of "Holocaust in Belarus" , Dr. Leonid Smilovitsky's
important work on the holocaust in Belarus, is progressing nicely. However,
the kitty containing donations is getting low, and more will be needed to
complete the job.

Dr. Smilovitsky should be well-known to Belarus SIG members, as he
generously & frequently donates articles to the SIG Newsletter.

Please donate to this project via the Jewishgen-erosity page:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

"Holocaust in Belarus" is the 9th project down the alphabetical list.

Thanks!
Irene Newhouse
Co-ordinator


2005 WARSAW CEMETERY #poland #warsaw

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

Ella asks the following:


<Thank you for the information, does it means that each one of the
directors
holds the data without sharing it with the other? Is it not data that
belongs to the community? Very odd!>

The Szenicer family database began over 25 years ago when Pinkus
Szenicer began documenting the gravestone information. The work was continued by
his son Boleslaw. Boleslaw shared much of his database with JRI-Poland and
that data is live on the JRI-Poland database. I believe the JRI-Poland
database probably contains about 80% of Boleslaw's data. When Boleslaw was
dismissed by the Warsaw Jewish Community, he took his data with him. If you find
a match on the JRI-Poland database, you can contact Boleslaw privately.
His website is located at http://www.jewishcem.waw.pl/ =20
There is contact information there.

When Isroel Szpilman was hired by the Jewish Community, he began to
document the Warsaw tombstone information anew. He shares his database with
JRI-Poland and this data is also on the JRI-Poland database. Last year,
JRI-Poland bought the Cemetery a digital camera so he can more easily
document the information. JRI-Poland has received several updates and
they are probably due for a new one. Information on this database can be
found at
http://www.jri-poland.org/cemetery/warsaw_beisolam.htm

There is actually a third limited Warsaw Cemetery Database and the
information can be found on this database at
http://www.jri-poland.org/jhi/jri-jhi-warsaw-cem-photos.htm

So though the tombstone information in the Warsaw Cemetery is hardly
complete and for those who have been there, know it is a very difficult
tasks, the data is shared with the Worldwide community.


Best of luck in your research

Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland 2005 WARSAW CEMETERY #warsaw #poland

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

Ella asks the following:


<Thank you for the information, does it means that each one of the
directors
holds the data without sharing it with the other? Is it not data that
belongs to the community? Very odd!>

The Szenicer family database began over 25 years ago when Pinkus
Szenicer began documenting the gravestone information. The work was continued by
his son Boleslaw. Boleslaw shared much of his database with JRI-Poland and
that data is live on the JRI-Poland database. I believe the JRI-Poland
database probably contains about 80% of Boleslaw's data. When Boleslaw was
dismissed by the Warsaw Jewish Community, he took his data with him. If you find
a match on the JRI-Poland database, you can contact Boleslaw privately.
His website is located at http://www.jewishcem.waw.pl/ =20
There is contact information there.

When Isroel Szpilman was hired by the Jewish Community, he began to
document the Warsaw tombstone information anew. He shares his database with
JRI-Poland and this data is also on the JRI-Poland database. Last year,
JRI-Poland bought the Cemetery a digital camera so he can more easily
document the information. JRI-Poland has received several updates and
they are probably due for a new one. Information on this database can be
found at
http://www.jri-poland.org/cemetery/warsaw_beisolam.htm

There is actually a third limited Warsaw Cemetery Database and the
information can be found on this database at
http://www.jri-poland.org/jhi/jri-jhi-warsaw-cem-photos.htm

So though the tombstone information in the Warsaw Cemetery is hardly
complete and for those who have been there, know it is a very difficult
tasks, the data is shared with the Worldwide community.


Best of luck in your research

Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY


JGS Sacramento - Navigating the N.Y. Census with Fewer Tears - Steve Morse #general

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento Meeting

When: Sunday, December 18, 10 a.m.
Where: Albert Einstein Residence Center
1935 Wright St.
Sacramento, CA
Speaker: Steve Morse
Topic: Navigating the New York Census with Fewer Tears

Many of us had relatives in New York during the early
part of the 20th century but obtaining census data
about them was difficult. Now, thanks to genealogy Web
pioneer Steve Morse, things are a little easier. On
December 18, you can be part of the first audience to
hear >from Steve about his newest one-step research
focus: the New York state censuses for 1905, 1915 and
1925. Steve, internationally known for his work in
simplifying the Ellis Island data base and other Web
sites (see www.stevemorse.org) will once again address
the Jewish Genealogy Society of Sacramento.

There were several state censuses taken in New York
starting >from 1790. Steve says the most valuable for
genealogical purposes are the 1905, 1915, and 1925
censuses because that was a time of a large influx of
immigration.

In the 1905/15/25 New York State censuses, the
information is arranged by Assembly District/Election
District in the actual census microfilms, so having an
address, rather than a name, is the key to finding
your relative. You need to know the AD/ED where that
person resided in the year the census was taken.
Steve's new one-step site for the New York City
boroughs provides the means for converting the
person's address into an AD/ED pair. >from there, you
can go to the correct microfilm roll and find the
census entry.

Come learn more on Sunday, December 18.

For more information,contact the Sacramento Jewish
Genealogical Society at jgs_sacramento@yahoo.com or
leave a message at 916-486-0906


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Sacramento - Navigating the N.Y. Census with Fewer Tears - Steve Morse #general

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento Meeting

When: Sunday, December 18, 10 a.m.
Where: Albert Einstein Residence Center
1935 Wright St.
Sacramento, CA
Speaker: Steve Morse
Topic: Navigating the New York Census with Fewer Tears

Many of us had relatives in New York during the early
part of the 20th century but obtaining census data
about them was difficult. Now, thanks to genealogy Web
pioneer Steve Morse, things are a little easier. On
December 18, you can be part of the first audience to
hear >from Steve about his newest one-step research
focus: the New York state censuses for 1905, 1915 and
1925. Steve, internationally known for his work in
simplifying the Ellis Island data base and other Web
sites (see www.stevemorse.org) will once again address
the Jewish Genealogy Society of Sacramento.

There were several state censuses taken in New York
starting >from 1790. Steve says the most valuable for
genealogical purposes are the 1905, 1915, and 1925
censuses because that was a time of a large influx of
immigration.

In the 1905/15/25 New York State censuses, the
information is arranged by Assembly District/Election
District in the actual census microfilms, so having an
address, rather than a name, is the key to finding
your relative. You need to know the AD/ED where that
person resided in the year the census was taken.
Steve's new one-step site for the New York City
boroughs provides the means for converting the
person's address into an AD/ED pair. >from there, you
can go to the correct microfilm roll and find the
census entry.

Come learn more on Sunday, December 18.

For more information,contact the Sacramento Jewish
Genealogical Society at jgs_sacramento@yahoo.com or
leave a message at 916-486-0906