Date   

Help interpreting photographs of an altar to Stalin sent home to America by a Russian Jew, 1939 #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

In the last ten days a fresh trove of family memorabilia has been sent to me for translation and
interpretation for my ongoing exhibit and book about the SPIWAK family, Jewish immigrants to the US
who fled Czarist Russia. In addition, a piece of troubling news that could unlock the story of one
branch of the family has come to light. I would like help interpreting both.

First, I have posted two images on ViewMate >from this new trove and need help contextualizing them.
The first shows a long room with what appears to be a kind of altar to Stalin at one end. Propaganda
posters adorn a side wall above a display of baskets of fruits and vegetables.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32451

The second shows a group of children dressed as Russian peasants forming a circle around a table with
baskets of fruit. They are posed beneath the portrait / altar to Stalin in the same room.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32452

Both were sent by Mollie MILSTEIN MIASKOFF >from Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in November
1939 and were found among the papers of the cousin who received them. In this second photo,
Mollie's five or six year old daughter, Laura, is the girl in the dress with dark stripes across >from the
camera. On the back of the photos Laura has drawn a house and a butterfly or written sweet notes to her
favorite cousin (among whose papers these were found). The contrast between the front of the
images and the backs is jarring. These photographs feel like propaganda for the good life in the
USSR. No envelopes or letters that go with the images have survived.

How were such stock images made and distributed, and for what purpose? Could these be school
photographs?

Some background. Mollie was born Malca MILSTEIN in Orgeyev, Bessarabia in 1905. Her mother
was Chane SPIWAK; her father Israel MILSTEIN. Mollie emigrated to the US with her parents and
siblings in 1921. She became a naturalized American in 1928, after marrying Reuben MIASKOFF,
also a Russian Jewish immigrant who naturalized. Like many thousands of Americans,
Mollie & Reuben made the terrible decision to move to the Soviet Union during the Great Depression,
persuaded by propaganda that Stalin's Communist regime would provide them with a better living:
good jobs, clean housing, better wages, full equality, and plenty of food. It was a time when many on
the left in the US believed Stalinist propaganda.

Mollie, Reuben, and Laura moved to the Soviet Union around 1935; early 1936 at the latest. I find it
hard (troubling) to believe that Mollie had not, by 1939, had her eyes opened to Stalin and the brutal
reality of life in the Soviet Union, and the fact that she was trapped there. (She was allowed to travel to
the US only once, in the late 1960s, and her daughter was never allowed out.) So I am wondering if the
photographs are calculated to ensure Mollie's safety as a naturalized American working as as
translator in high security offices--convincing censors or suspicious colleagues and neighbors that
Mollie was a true believer. As I understand it (and I am just beginning my research into this) it could
have been dangerous simply to correspond with her family in the US. Comments, please?

Next: In the last week it has come to light that just before Mollie decided to move to the Soviet Union,
she worked as a translator for Amtorg (American Trading Organization) in New York City. Amtorg, it is
now well known, was a cover organization for Soviet industrial espionage as early as the 1920s.
Family elders think it was Amtorg that found Mollie a job in the USSR and that Amtorg may even have
helped pay her family's travel expenses, since no one in the immigrant generation wanted anything
to do with her choice.

Using Mollie's snap shots with dates and place names and the internet, I have begun to piece together
the trajectory of her life in the Soviet Union.

When she moved to the Soviet Union in 1935-36, Mollie lived first in Zaporijie, Ukraine, near the
Dneiper River, the site of brand new metallurgical works (created with materials and plans stolen from
or given by American corporations), and the famous hydroelectric dam. She then
moved (or was ordered to move?) to Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in 1939. Stupino was a "closed city"
that appeared on no map or railroad timetable. It was the locus of a strategically important Soviet
airfield and the war in Europe had begun. One needed a KGB clearance to live there.
There is nothing at all >from or about Mollie >from 1940 (when she sent more photos home) until
1944, when I found Mollie and Laura on a Joint Distribution List of people receiving packages.
According to the JDC, Mollie and Laura were then living in Ufa. I now know that Ufa, in far eastern
Siberia, was one of the sites Stalin prepared for the relocation of factories he ordered dismantled,
their parts transported by a railway system he had built years before the anticipated advance of Nazi
troops into Soviet territory, then reconstructed. After Ufa, where Mollie may well have still served as a
translator, I can find nothing of her whereabouts until she sends her first letter home in 1947 >from
Elektrostal, ("electric steel") near Moscow. It turns out that all four places Mollie lived were high
security military/industrial centers.

Would Mollie's apparent support of Stalin, suggested by the 1939 photographs, have been her way of
deflecting any suspicion of her loyalties, and so, assuring her safety in such a place? Does anyone
else have such images in their family memorabilia? Can anyone refer me to historical sources for
images like this one? Or do you have stories about kin who returned to Russia and found themselves
trapped? Even an idealist as impulsive as Mollie must have learned by 1939 how dangerous and
murderous Stalin's regime was, yes?

Also: How would the Joint have found Mollie and sent her a package? Would someone here have
asked /paid for a package for her? Would she have applied >from Ufa? Or would a JDC representative
been sent there?

I am off to the library for books about Americans trapped in the Soviet Union (The Forsaken,
among others) will soon visit the Amtorg papers at the New York Public Library, but in the meantime, I
am eager to learn >from others who may have similar stories in their family history.

Thank you!


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA
http://pklindienst.com/NoOneRemembers Alone

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Romania SIG #Romania Help interpreting photographs of an altar to Stalin sent home to America by a Russian Jew, 1939 #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

In the last ten days a fresh trove of family memorabilia has been sent to me for translation and
interpretation for my ongoing exhibit and book about the SPIWAK family, Jewish immigrants to the US
who fled Czarist Russia. In addition, a piece of troubling news that could unlock the story of one
branch of the family has come to light. I would like help interpreting both.

First, I have posted two images on ViewMate >from this new trove and need help contextualizing them.
The first shows a long room with what appears to be a kind of altar to Stalin at one end. Propaganda
posters adorn a side wall above a display of baskets of fruits and vegetables.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32451

The second shows a group of children dressed as Russian peasants forming a circle around a table with
baskets of fruit. They are posed beneath the portrait / altar to Stalin in the same room.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32452

Both were sent by Mollie MILSTEIN MIASKOFF >from Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in November
1939 and were found among the papers of the cousin who received them. In this second photo,
Mollie's five or six year old daughter, Laura, is the girl in the dress with dark stripes across >from the
camera. On the back of the photos Laura has drawn a house and a butterfly or written sweet notes to her
favorite cousin (among whose papers these were found). The contrast between the front of the
images and the backs is jarring. These photographs feel like propaganda for the good life in the
USSR. No envelopes or letters that go with the images have survived.

How were such stock images made and distributed, and for what purpose? Could these be school
photographs?

Some background. Mollie was born Malca MILSTEIN in Orgeyev, Bessarabia in 1905. Her mother
was Chane SPIWAK; her father Israel MILSTEIN. Mollie emigrated to the US with her parents and
siblings in 1921. She became a naturalized American in 1928, after marrying Reuben MIASKOFF,
also a Russian Jewish immigrant who naturalized. Like many thousands of Americans,
Mollie & Reuben made the terrible decision to move to the Soviet Union during the Great Depression,
persuaded by propaganda that Stalin's Communist regime would provide them with a better living:
good jobs, clean housing, better wages, full equality, and plenty of food. It was a time when many on
the left in the US believed Stalinist propaganda.

Mollie, Reuben, and Laura moved to the Soviet Union around 1935; early 1936 at the latest. I find it
hard (troubling) to believe that Mollie had not, by 1939, had her eyes opened to Stalin and the brutal
reality of life in the Soviet Union, and the fact that she was trapped there. (She was allowed to travel to
the US only once, in the late 1960s, and her daughter was never allowed out.) So I am wondering if the
photographs are calculated to ensure Mollie's safety as a naturalized American working as as
translator in high security offices--convincing censors or suspicious colleagues and neighbors that
Mollie was a true believer. As I understand it (and I am just beginning my research into this) it could
have been dangerous simply to correspond with her family in the US. Comments, please?

Next: In the last week it has come to light that just before Mollie decided to move to the Soviet Union,
she worked as a translator for Amtorg (American Trading Organization) in New York City. Amtorg, it is
now well known, was a cover organization for Soviet industrial espionage as early as the 1920s.
Family elders think it was Amtorg that found Mollie a job in the USSR and that Amtorg may even have
helped pay her family's travel expenses, since no one in the immigrant generation wanted anything
to do with her choice.

Using Mollie's snap shots with dates and place names and the internet, I have begun to piece together
the trajectory of her life in the Soviet Union.

When she moved to the Soviet Union in 1935-36, Mollie lived first in Zaporijie, Ukraine, near the
Dneiper River, the site of brand new metallurgical works (created with materials and plans stolen from
or given by American corporations), and the famous hydroelectric dam. She then
moved (or was ordered to move?) to Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in 1939. Stupino was a "closed city"
that appeared on no map or railroad timetable. It was the locus of a strategically important Soviet
airfield and the war in Europe had begun. One needed a KGB clearance to live there.
There is nothing at all >from or about Mollie >from 1940 (when she sent more photos home) until
1944, when I found Mollie and Laura on a Joint Distribution List of people receiving packages.
According to the JDC, Mollie and Laura were then living in Ufa. I now know that Ufa, in far eastern
Siberia, was one of the sites Stalin prepared for the relocation of factories he ordered dismantled,
their parts transported by a railway system he had built years before the anticipated advance of Nazi
troops into Soviet territory, then reconstructed. After Ufa, where Mollie may well have still served as a
translator, I can find nothing of her whereabouts until she sends her first letter home in 1947 >from
Elektrostal, ("electric steel") near Moscow. It turns out that all four places Mollie lived were high
security military/industrial centers.

Would Mollie's apparent support of Stalin, suggested by the 1939 photographs, have been her way of
deflecting any suspicion of her loyalties, and so, assuring her safety in such a place? Does anyone
else have such images in their family memorabilia? Can anyone refer me to historical sources for
images like this one? Or do you have stories about kin who returned to Russia and found themselves
trapped? Even an idealist as impulsive as Mollie must have learned by 1939 how dangerous and
murderous Stalin's regime was, yes?

Also: How would the Joint have found Mollie and sent her a package? Would someone here have
asked /paid for a package for her? Would she have applied >from Ufa? Or would a JDC representative
been sent there?

I am off to the library for books about Americans trapped in the Soviet Union (The Forsaken,
among others) will soon visit the Amtorg papers at the New York Public Library, but in the meantime, I
am eager to learn >from others who may have similar stories in their family history.

Thank you!


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA
http://pklindienst.com/NoOneRemembers Alone

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


ViewMate Photo Dating Request #romania

Carol Hochstadt
 

Dear Fellow Genners,
I've posted two related photos in the ViewMate gallery.
I believe that the solo photo of the boy was reproduced in New York
from the photo of the family - which was taken previously in Jassy,
Romania. Perhaps he passed away and the family wanted the solo photo
as a remembrance?
In my quest to figure out the identity of these family members, it
would be very helpful to get approximate dates of both photos.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32481
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32482

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Many thanks in advance for your help!
Carol Hochstadt, Salt Lake City UT


Romania SIG #Romania ViewMate Photo Dating Request #romania

Carol Hochstadt
 

Dear Fellow Genners,
I've posted two related photos in the ViewMate gallery.
I believe that the solo photo of the boy was reproduced in New York
from the photo of the family - which was taken previously in Jassy,
Romania. Perhaps he passed away and the family wanted the solo photo
as a remembrance?
In my quest to figure out the identity of these family members, it
would be very helpful to get approximate dates of both photos.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32481
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32482

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Many thanks in advance for your help!
Carol Hochstadt, Salt Lake City UT


Yasse, Romania #romania

Elaine Frank <efrank76@...>
 

I have just started doing my genealogy research and have run into a block. One of my grandfathers
came >from Yasse, Romania and I can't find that town in
google. Does anyone know if the name and/or country has changed. Thanks for your help.

Elaine Frank
efrank76@...


Romania SIG #Romania Yasse, Romania #romania

Elaine Frank <efrank76@...>
 

I have just started doing my genealogy research and have run into a block. One of my grandfathers
came >from Yasse, Romania and I can't find that town in
google. Does anyone know if the name and/or country has changed. Thanks for your help.

Elaine Frank
efrank76@...


Paris 2012 post Conference Newsletter special proceedings #poland #warsaw

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

July 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive (www.genealoj.org)
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@... )

Post Conference Newsletter ***Special "Proceedings"***
February 27, 2014

The Proceedings of the 32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy are almost all available

You will find there everything you liked so much (or missed!) during
those 4 exciting days of July 2012

• Almost complete French-English bilingualism;
• A particular focus on Europe, its medieval settlements, its
cemeteries, its archives;
• A unique look at the genealogy and history of the Sephardic as
well as the Ashkenazi communities;
• All aspects of your researches: history, resources, legacy
preservation, transmission, nature and nurture, fancy genealogies,
origin and identity, genetics, the Holocaust, ethics, biblical
genealogies and of course methodology;
• Speakers >from all over the world.

Some *150 texts* have been collected into *4 volumes* with bibliographies,
documents...
***
- Volume 1: **The Western World**: 32 texts relating to France, Western
Europe (including Italy but not Spain), the United States and Israel. 330
pages – completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French volume).
*Available*
***
- Volume 2: **Central and Eastern Europe**: (including Germany and Austria).
37 papers, 292 pages - completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French
volume). *Available*
***
- Volume 3: **Sephardic, Middle-East, and African areas**: 57 papers or
summaries, 506 pages, some texts are translated, others are in their
original language accompanied by abstracts in the other language (1
bilingual volume). *Available before the end of February*
***
- Volume 4: Thematic lectures (Holocaust, genetics, ethics...) and
Methodological workshops (genealogical travels, use of pictures, publishing,
deciphering Hebrew, software)... About 35 papers. Completely translated (1
English volume - 1 French volume). This volume is *still in preparation*.
***
Volumes can be ordered *separately or together* in *hard copy* or on *digital
support*. Hard copies are available *in color* and in *black & white*.
If you buy a hard copy you will also receive the corresponding digitized
version.

Contact CGJ - 45 rue La Bruyère 75009 Paris - +33 (0) 1 40 23 04 90 -
secretariat@... – www.genealoj.org


Secure on-line Conference Family Finder #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

One of the exciting advances for this summer's IAJGS Conference will
be an on-line Conference Family Finder. The Family Finder will provide
a wide range of search options as well as offering the ability to
browse, page-by-page. It will protect privacy of those who
submit their input. Additionally, it will be available well before the
conference so that registrants can make contact and arrange to get
together at the conference. For more information, please click
on the following link: http://conference.iajgs.org/2014/faq.cfm/#Conf0.

Hal Bookbinder, lead co-Chair
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


World War I Family Story Upload Feature is now Available on the IAJGS Conference Website! #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

The theme of the upcoming IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy is the 100th Anniversary of the start of World War I. To
commemorate this event, the Conference is offering registrants (both
those who will attend the conference in Salt Lake City and those who
register to access it LIVE! over the Internet) the chance to share
their Family?s World War I era stories and photos. Stories may relate
to military service, the disruption caused by fighting, forced
relocation, emigration, or other topics related to this era.

Now is the time to write your story and gather your pictures. You may
upload your story and related photos using the World War I Story
Upload feature on the Conference website, www.iajgs2014.org . The
purpose of this feature is to allow the Conference Committee to gather
all of your stories and memories into a unique online exhibit and
possibly a printed memory book. We also plan a World War I picture
display at the Conference.

To use the World War I Story Upload Feature you must first register
for the conference. Then, use the Registration Update feature to
upload your story and associated pictures. You will need your
registration email and password to log into the Registration Update
feature. If you have forgotten your password, the Registration Update
page has a "Forgot password" function. We will periodically extract
stories to share through social media (Discussion Forum, Blog,
Facebook and Twitter). We envision cutting off updates as of June 15,
2014 to allow time to create the online exhibit for the conference.

Hal Bookbinder, Lead Conference co-Chair,
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Salt Lake City, UT
7/27-8/1/2014
www.iajgs2014.org


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Paris 2012 post Conference Newsletter special proceedings #warsaw #poland

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

July 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive (www.genealoj.org)
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@... )

Post Conference Newsletter ***Special "Proceedings"***
February 27, 2014

The Proceedings of the 32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy are almost all available

You will find there everything you liked so much (or missed!) during
those 4 exciting days of July 2012

• Almost complete French-English bilingualism;
• A particular focus on Europe, its medieval settlements, its
cemeteries, its archives;
• A unique look at the genealogy and history of the Sephardic as
well as the Ashkenazi communities;
• All aspects of your researches: history, resources, legacy
preservation, transmission, nature and nurture, fancy genealogies,
origin and identity, genetics, the Holocaust, ethics, biblical
genealogies and of course methodology;
• Speakers >from all over the world.

Some *150 texts* have been collected into *4 volumes* with bibliographies,
documents...
***
- Volume 1: **The Western World**: 32 texts relating to France, Western
Europe (including Italy but not Spain), the United States and Israel. 330
pages – completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French volume).
*Available*
***
- Volume 2: **Central and Eastern Europe**: (including Germany and Austria).
37 papers, 292 pages - completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French
volume). *Available*
***
- Volume 3: **Sephardic, Middle-East, and African areas**: 57 papers or
summaries, 506 pages, some texts are translated, others are in their
original language accompanied by abstracts in the other language (1
bilingual volume). *Available before the end of February*
***
- Volume 4: Thematic lectures (Holocaust, genetics, ethics...) and
Methodological workshops (genealogical travels, use of pictures, publishing,
deciphering Hebrew, software)... About 35 papers. Completely translated (1
English volume - 1 French volume). This volume is *still in preparation*.
***
Volumes can be ordered *separately or together* in *hard copy* or on *digital
support*. Hard copies are available *in color* and in *black & white*.
If you buy a hard copy you will also receive the corresponding digitized
version.

Contact CGJ - 45 rue La Bruyère 75009 Paris - +33 (0) 1 40 23 04 90 -
secretariat@... – www.genealoj.org


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Secure on-line Conference Family Finder #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

One of the exciting advances for this summer's IAJGS Conference will
be an on-line Conference Family Finder. The Family Finder will provide
a wide range of search options as well as offering the ability to
browse, page-by-page. It will protect privacy of those who
submit their input. Additionally, it will be available well before the
conference so that registrants can make contact and arrange to get
together at the conference. For more information, please click
on the following link: http://conference.iajgs.org/2014/faq.cfm/#Conf0.

Hal Bookbinder, lead co-Chair
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland World War I Family Story Upload Feature is now Available on the IAJGS Conference Website! #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

The theme of the upcoming IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy is the 100th Anniversary of the start of World War I. To
commemorate this event, the Conference is offering registrants (both
those who will attend the conference in Salt Lake City and those who
register to access it LIVE! over the Internet) the chance to share
their Family?s World War I era stories and photos. Stories may relate
to military service, the disruption caused by fighting, forced
relocation, emigration, or other topics related to this era.

Now is the time to write your story and gather your pictures. You may
upload your story and related photos using the World War I Story
Upload feature on the Conference website, www.iajgs2014.org . The
purpose of this feature is to allow the Conference Committee to gather
all of your stories and memories into a unique online exhibit and
possibly a printed memory book. We also plan a World War I picture
display at the Conference.

To use the World War I Story Upload Feature you must first register
for the conference. Then, use the Registration Update feature to
upload your story and associated pictures. You will need your
registration email and password to log into the Registration Update
feature. If you have forgotten your password, the Registration Update
page has a "Forgot password" function. We will periodically extract
stories to share through social media (Discussion Forum, Blog,
Facebook and Twitter). We envision cutting off updates as of June 15,
2014 to allow time to create the online exhibit for the conference.

Hal Bookbinder, Lead Conference co-Chair,
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Salt Lake City, UT
7/27-8/1/2014
www.iajgs2014.org


Yizkor Book Project, February 2014 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although February is a notoriously short month, I was pleased to see great
progress made in a number of aspects of the Yizkor Book Project.

To begin with, I am pleased to inform you that during the last month, a
further project joined the ranks of fully completed translations. This time
we saw the culmination of the Grajewo project and I would like to thank the
coordinators, Shelly Levin and Evelyn Fine, for their caring and dedication
in leading this project through its successful completion. On the horizon,
there are a number of other projects that are close to the end and suggest
you follow coming reports for similar announcements.

February also saw the addition of 3 new Translation Funds which have been
set up to allow people interested in financially supporting the professional
translation of the following Yizkor books.

- Ostrów Mazowiecka, Poland
- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine
- Telsiai (Telz), Lithuania

If you are able to support any of these projects or any of the 75 listed
Translation funds listed here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

you would be doing something very practical and important to allow us to
make these books and the treasures they contain, available to researchers
worldwide and keep the memories of these communities alive.

Lastly, I would like to note our Yizkor Book in Print Project which recently
added a further volume to its continually growing library of English
translations of our Yizkor book projects.

- Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of Antopol, Belarus -
Translation of the Yizkor (Memorial) Book of the Jewish Community of Antopol

In addition, the following book will be available for purchase in the
nearest future:

- Yizkor (Memorial) Book of Lyubcha and Delyatichi - Translation of Lubtch
ve-Delatitch; Sefer Zikaron

As I've noted before, I quite often receive queries regarding available
books and for those of you who are interested, a full list of the published
books appears at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Now to facts and figures for February.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Cigand, Hungary (About the Jews of Cigand)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/cigand/cigand.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyuboml/lyuboml.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L (Sofyovka
and Ignatovka)) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bessarabia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00279.html

- Borsa, Romania (Memorial book of Borsha, or: The beloved village by the
foot of the Carpathians) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borsa/borsa.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Disna, Belarus (Disna; memorial book of the community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/disna/disna.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Indura, Belarus (Amdur, my hometown)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/indura/indura.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suchowola, Poland (Suchovola Memorial Library of Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/suchowola/suchowola.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki: a Town that Existed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai1/Valkininkai1.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yizkor Book Project, February 2014 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although February is a notoriously short month, I was pleased to see great
progress made in a number of aspects of the Yizkor Book Project.

To begin with, I am pleased to inform you that during the last month, a
further project joined the ranks of fully completed translations. This time
we saw the culmination of the Grajewo project and I would like to thank the
coordinators, Shelly Levin and Evelyn Fine, for their caring and dedication
in leading this project through its successful completion. On the horizon,
there are a number of other projects that are close to the end and suggest
you follow coming reports for similar announcements.

February also saw the addition of 3 new Translation Funds which have been
set up to allow people interested in financially supporting the professional
translation of the following Yizkor books.

- Ostrów Mazowiecka, Poland
- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine
- Telsiai (Telz), Lithuania

If you are able to support any of these projects or any of the 75 listed
Translation funds listed here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

you would be doing something very practical and important to allow us to
make these books and the treasures they contain, available to researchers
worldwide and keep the memories of these communities alive.

Lastly, I would like to note our Yizkor Book in Print Project which recently
added a further volume to its continually growing library of English
translations of our Yizkor book projects.

- Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of Antopol, Belarus -
Translation of the Yizkor (Memorial) Book of the Jewish Community of Antopol

In addition, the following book will be available for purchase in the
nearest future:

- Yizkor (Memorial) Book of Lyubcha and Delyatichi - Translation of Lubtch
ve-Delatitch; Sefer Zikaron

As I've noted before, I quite often receive queries regarding available
books and for those of you who are interested, a full list of the published
books appears at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Now to facts and figures for February.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Cigand, Hungary (About the Jews of Cigand)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/cigand/cigand.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyuboml/lyuboml.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L (Sofyovka
and Ignatovka)) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bessarabia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00279.html

- Borsa, Romania (Memorial book of Borsha, or: The beloved village by the
foot of the Carpathians) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borsa/borsa.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Disna, Belarus (Disna; memorial book of the community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/disna/disna.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Indura, Belarus (Amdur, my hometown)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/indura/indura.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suchowola, Poland (Suchovola Memorial Library of Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/suchowola/suchowola.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki: a Town that Existed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai1/Valkininkai1.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yizkor Book Project, February 2014 #france

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although February is a notoriously short month, I was pleased to see great
progress made in a number of aspects of the Yizkor Book Project.

To begin with, I am pleased to inform you that during the last month, a
further project joined the ranks of fully completed translations. This time
we saw the culmination of the Grajewo project and I would like to thank the
coordinators, Shelly Levin and Evelyn Fine, for their caring and dedication
in leading this project through its successful completion. On the horizon,
there are a number of other projects that are close to the end and suggest
you follow coming reports for similar announcements.

February also saw the addition of 3 new Translation Funds which have been
set up to allow people interested in financially supporting the professional
translation of the following Yizkor books.

- Ostrów Mazowiecka, Poland
- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine
- Telsiai (Telz), Lithuania

If you are able to support any of these projects or any of the 75 listed
Translation funds listed here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

you would be doing something very practical and important to allow us to
make these books and the treasures they contain, available to researchers
worldwide and keep the memories of these communities alive.

Lastly, I would like to note our Yizkor Book in Print Project which recently
added a further volume to its continually growing library of English
translations of our Yizkor book projects.

- Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of Antopol, Belarus -
Translation of the Yizkor (Memorial) Book of the Jewish Community of Antopol

In addition, the following book will be available for purchase in the
nearest future:

- Yizkor (Memorial) Book of Lyubcha and Delyatichi - Translation of Lubtch
ve-Delatitch; Sefer Zikaron

As I've noted before, I quite often receive queries regarding available
books and for those of you who are interested, a full list of the published
books appears at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Now to facts and figures for February.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Cigand, Hungary (About the Jews of Cigand)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/cigand/cigand.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyuboml/lyuboml.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L (Sofyovka
and Ignatovka)) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bessarabia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00279.html

- Borsa, Romania (Memorial book of Borsha, or: The beloved village by the
foot of the Carpathians) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borsa/borsa.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Disna, Belarus (Disna; memorial book of the community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/disna/disna.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Indura, Belarus (Amdur, my hometown)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/indura/indura.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suchowola, Poland (Suchovola Memorial Library of Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/suchowola/suchowola.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki: a Town that Existed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai1/Valkininkai1.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


French SIG #France Yizkor Book Project, February 2014 #france

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Although February is a notoriously short month, I was pleased to see great
progress made in a number of aspects of the Yizkor Book Project.

To begin with, I am pleased to inform you that during the last month, a
further project joined the ranks of fully completed translations. This time
we saw the culmination of the Grajewo project and I would like to thank the
coordinators, Shelly Levin and Evelyn Fine, for their caring and dedication
in leading this project through its successful completion. On the horizon,
there are a number of other projects that are close to the end and suggest
you follow coming reports for similar announcements.

February also saw the addition of 3 new Translation Funds which have been
set up to allow people interested in financially supporting the professional
translation of the following Yizkor books.

- Ostrów Mazowiecka, Poland
- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine
- Telsiai (Telz), Lithuania

If you are able to support any of these projects or any of the 75 listed
Translation funds listed here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23

you would be doing something very practical and important to allow us to
make these books and the treasures they contain, available to researchers
worldwide and keep the memories of these communities alive.

Lastly, I would like to note our Yizkor Book in Print Project which recently
added a further volume to its continually growing library of English
translations of our Yizkor book projects.

- Shards of Memory: Messages >from the Lost Shtetl of Antopol, Belarus -
Translation of the Yizkor (Memorial) Book of the Jewish Community of Antopol

In addition, the following book will be available for purchase in the
nearest future:

- Yizkor (Memorial) Book of Lyubcha and Delyatichi - Translation of Lubtch
ve-Delatitch; Sefer Zikaron

As I've noted before, I quite often receive queries regarding available
books and for those of you who are interested, a full list of the published
books appears at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Now to facts and figures for February.

During this last month we have added in 4 new projects:

- Cigand, Hungary (About the Jews of Cigand)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/cigand/cigand.html

- Lyuboml, Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyuboml/lyuboml.html

- Sosnove (Ludvipol), Ukraine (Ludvipol (Wolyn); in memory of the Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Ludvipol/Ludvipol.html

- Zofyuvka, Ukraine (The tree and the roots; the history of T.L (Sofyovka
and Ignatovka)) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Zofyuvka/Zofyuvka.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bessarabia (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania - Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00279.html

- Borsa, Romania (Memorial book of Borsha, or: The beloved village by the
foot of the Carpathians) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/borsa/borsa.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Disna, Belarus (Disna; memorial book of the community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/disna/disna.html

- Dubasari, Moldova (Dubossary Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Dubossary/Dubossary.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Indura, Belarus (Amdur, my hometown)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/indura/indura.html

- Jadow, Poland (The Book of Jadow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/jadow/jadow.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Kolomyya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kolomey)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kolomyya/kolomyya.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Suchowola, Poland (Suchovola Memorial Library of Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/suchowola/suchowola.html

- Tlumach, Ukraine (Memorial book of Tlumacz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tlumacz/tlumacz.html

- Valkininkai, Lithuania (Olkeniki: a Town that Existed)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Valkininkai1/Valkininkai1.html

- Wasilkow, Poland (The Wasilkower memorial book; memories of our town
Wasilkow which has been annihilated by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Wasilkow/Wasilkow.html

- Zawiercie, Poland (Yizkor Book of the Holy Community of Zawiercie and
Environs) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zawiercie/zawiercie.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Help needed in Newark, NJ #general

Cindy g
 

I am looking for someone who could visit and photograph a tombstone in the Grove St.
Cemetery in Newark, NJ. My request to the New Jersey State Archives for a copy of
the death certificate was returned as "not found." I think that my next best hope
is that the tombstone will have the name of the deceased's father inscribed on it.
Please contact me personally. Thank you.

Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help needed in Newark, NJ #general

Cindy g
 

I am looking for someone who could visit and photograph a tombstone in the Grove St.
Cemetery in Newark, NJ. My request to the New Jersey State Archives for a copy of
the death certificate was returned as "not found." I think that my next best hope
is that the tombstone will have the name of the deceased's father inscribed on it.
Please contact me personally. Thank you.

Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO


Re: records from Chile #general

boris
 

I would try to find a Jewish Community Center (or whatever its name is) in
Santiago to seek their advice or help. Be aware that few people there speak
English. A "National Archive" or a "Central Public Library" is another way
of inquiry.

Regarding port of entry, there is only one, Valparaiso, but it's on the West
Coast. I have not researched Chile and do not know whether passenger ships
went all the way around South America. A logical way would be to disembark
in Buenos Aires and then travel to Chile by land. There was and still is
migration between Chile and Argentina, both ways.

Good luck.

Boris Feldblyum


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: records from Chile #general

boris
 

I would try to find a Jewish Community Center (or whatever its name is) in
Santiago to seek their advice or help. Be aware that few people there speak
English. A "National Archive" or a "Central Public Library" is another way
of inquiry.

Regarding port of entry, there is only one, Valparaiso, but it's on the West
Coast. I have not researched Chile and do not know whether passenger ships
went all the way around South America. A logical way would be to disembark
in Buenos Aires and then travel to Chile by land. There was and still is
migration between Chile and Argentina, both ways.

Good luck.

Boris Feldblyum

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