Date   

IGRA joins in celebrating National Women's History Month #general

Garri Regev
 

In the United States March is being celebrated as National Women's History Month.
IGRA lends its recognition of the very important role of women by highlighting some
of the databases in our collection as shown in this presentation:
http://www.slideshare.net/igra3/national-womens-history-month-in-the-us-2014

These databases showcase the role of women in the founding of the State of Israel
and the important institutions that have become the foundation of the country.
Founders of Petah Tikva, Shfeya, Zichron Ya'akov, women immigrants in 1882, women
involved in WIZO, Hadassah & Na'amat, those certified to be nurses 1923-52 and
midwives up to 1959, many who served in the Haganah and Palmach or on the Women's
Workers' Council, Perhaps you will find new research sources.

Garri Regev
President, IGRA
www.genealogy.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen IGRA joins in celebrating National Women's History Month #general

Garri Regev
 

In the United States March is being celebrated as National Women's History Month.
IGRA lends its recognition of the very important role of women by highlighting some
of the databases in our collection as shown in this presentation:
http://www.slideshare.net/igra3/national-womens-history-month-in-the-us-2014

These databases showcase the role of women in the founding of the State of Israel
and the important institutions that have become the foundation of the country.
Founders of Petah Tikva, Shfeya, Zichron Ya'akov, women immigrants in 1882, women
involved in WIZO, Hadassah & Na'amat, those certified to be nurses 1923-52 and
midwives up to 1959, many who served in the Haganah and Palmach or on the Women's
Workers' Council, Perhaps you will find new research sources.

Garri Regev
President, IGRA
www.genealogy.org.il


Re: records from Chile #general

montereybayrob@...
 

JoAnne,

According to the Registro Civil (https://www.registrocivil.cl/home.html) the RUN
number can be found on the Certificate of Matrimony. However, I'm guessing that
if you sent an email in Spanish indicating what you want and for what purpose they
will tell you.

You also may want to ask: http://www.cis.cl/Default.htm
Under Jevra Kadisha are some notations.

Rob Weisskirch
Marina, CA

Does anyone have experience retrieving records >from Santiago, Chile?
I am trying to get death certificates for the three of my husband's =20
ancestors who immigrated to Chile in 1937.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: records from Chile #general

montereybayrob@...
 

JoAnne,

According to the Registro Civil (https://www.registrocivil.cl/home.html) the RUN
number can be found on the Certificate of Matrimony. However, I'm guessing that
if you sent an email in Spanish indicating what you want and for what purpose they
will tell you.

You also may want to ask: http://www.cis.cl/Default.htm
Under Jevra Kadisha are some notations.

Rob Weisskirch
Marina, CA

Does anyone have experience retrieving records >from Santiago, Chile?
I am trying to get death certificates for the three of my husband's =20
ancestors who immigrated to Chile in 1937.


Bayside Cemetery, Queens, N.Y. #general

richard baum <rxbaum@...>
 

Linda:

Have you considered telephoning Bayside Cemetery at (718)8434840?

richie baum


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bayside Cemetery, Queens, N.Y. #general

richard baum <rxbaum@...>
 

Linda:

Have you considered telephoning Bayside Cemetery at (718)8434840?

richie baum


Re: Where is Dribyn? #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

rosef@... (Rose Feldman) wrote:

In the 19th century Montefiore Censuses of the population of Eretz
Israel, there is a group of people in the Habad Hassidic Kolel in
Hebron and Jerusalem who came >from Dribyn in either Belarus or
Lithuania (not sure which). I couldn't locate the town in the
JewishGen Communities Database or in the Town Locator. Does anyone
recognize the place?
It is Yiddish for "driven", Ger. "treiben" = to drive.
cf "fordribyn hoot ouz" = "had driven out out of":
".. das er uns for dribyn hoot ouz dem houz hunger halbyn."
[Yiddish: A Survey and a Grammar, Salomo A. Birnbaum,Solomon Asher Birnbaum]
... that he had driven us out of [our] house for reason of hunger.

However:
Drybin, Belarus
Alternate names: Drybin [Bel, Pol], Dribin [Rus], Staryy Dribin
Region: Mogilev
Jewish Population in 1900: 971

<http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1942601>

Google maps:

<http://goo.gl/maps/0z9tX>

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Where is Dribyn? #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

rosef@... (Rose Feldman) wrote:

In the 19th century Montefiore Censuses of the population of Eretz
Israel, there is a group of people in the Habad Hassidic Kolel in
Hebron and Jerusalem who came >from Dribyn in either Belarus or
Lithuania (not sure which). I couldn't locate the town in the
JewishGen Communities Database or in the Town Locator. Does anyone
recognize the place?
It is Yiddish for "driven", Ger. "treiben" = to drive.
cf "fordribyn hoot ouz" = "had driven out out of":
".. das er uns for dribyn hoot ouz dem houz hunger halbyn."
[Yiddish: A Survey and a Grammar, Salomo A. Birnbaum,Solomon Asher Birnbaum]
... that he had driven us out of [our] house for reason of hunger.

However:
Drybin, Belarus
Alternate names: Drybin [Bel, Pol], Dribin [Rus], Staryy Dribin
Region: Mogilev
Jewish Population in 1900: 971

<http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~community~-1942601>

Google maps:

<http://goo.gl/maps/0z9tX>

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


Help interpreting photographs of an altar to Stalin sent home to America by a Russian Jew, 1939 #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

In the last ten days a fresh trove of family memorabilia has been sent to me for translation and
interpretation for my ongoing exhibit and book about the SPIWAK family, Jewish immigrants to the US
who fled Czarist Russia. In addition, a piece of troubling news that could unlock the story of one
branch of the family has come to light. I would like help interpreting both.

First, I have posted two images on ViewMate >from this new trove and need help contextualizing them.
The first shows a long room with what appears to be a kind of altar to Stalin at one end. Propaganda
posters adorn a side wall above a display of baskets of fruits and vegetables.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32451

The second shows a group of children dressed as Russian peasants forming a circle around a table with
baskets of fruit. They are posed beneath the portrait / altar to Stalin in the same room.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32452

Both were sent by Mollie MILSTEIN MIASKOFF >from Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in November
1939 and were found among the papers of the cousin who received them. In this second photo,
Mollie's five or six year old daughter, Laura, is the girl in the dress with dark stripes across >from the
camera. On the back of the photos Laura has drawn a house and a butterfly or written sweet notes to her
favorite cousin (among whose papers these were found). The contrast between the front of the
images and the backs is jarring. These photographs feel like propaganda for the good life in the
USSR. No envelopes or letters that go with the images have survived.

How were such stock images made and distributed, and for what purpose? Could these be school
photographs?

Some background. Mollie was born Malca MILSTEIN in Orgeyev, Bessarabia in 1905. Her mother
was Chane SPIWAK; her father Israel MILSTEIN. Mollie emigrated to the US with her parents and
siblings in 1921. She became a naturalized American in 1928, after marrying Reuben MIASKOFF,
also a Russian Jewish immigrant who naturalized. Like many thousands of Americans,
Mollie & Reuben made the terrible decision to move to the Soviet Union during the Great Depression,
persuaded by propaganda that Stalin's Communist regime would provide them with a better living:
good jobs, clean housing, better wages, full equality, and plenty of food. It was a time when many on
the left in the US believed Stalinist propaganda.

Mollie, Reuben, and Laura moved to the Soviet Union around 1935; early 1936 at the latest. I find it
hard (troubling) to believe that Mollie had not, by 1939, had her eyes opened to Stalin and the brutal
reality of life in the Soviet Union, and the fact that she was trapped there. (She was allowed to travel to
the US only once, in the late 1960s, and her daughter was never allowed out.) So I am wondering if the
photographs are calculated to ensure Mollie's safety as a naturalized American working as as
translator in high security offices--convincing censors or suspicious colleagues and neighbors that
Mollie was a true believer. As I understand it (and I am just beginning my research into this) it could
have been dangerous simply to correspond with her family in the US. Comments, please?

Next: In the last week it has come to light that just before Mollie decided to move to the Soviet Union,
she worked as a translator for Amtorg (American Trading Organization) in New York City. Amtorg, it is
now well known, was a cover organization for Soviet industrial espionage as early as the 1920s.
Family elders think it was Amtorg that found Mollie a job in the USSR and that Amtorg may even have
helped pay her family's travel expenses, since no one in the immigrant generation wanted anything
to do with her choice.

Using Mollie's snap shots with dates and place names and the internet, I have begun to piece together
the trajectory of her life in the Soviet Union.

When she moved to the Soviet Union in 1935-36, Mollie lived first in Zaporijie, Ukraine, near the
Dneiper River, the site of brand new metallurgical works (created with materials and plans stolen from
or given by American corporations), and the famous hydroelectric dam. She then
moved (or was ordered to move?) to Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in 1939. Stupino was a "closed city"
that appeared on no map or railroad timetable. It was the locus of a strategically important Soviet
airfield and the war in Europe had begun. One needed a KGB clearance to live there.
There is nothing at all >from or about Mollie >from 1940 (when she sent more photos home) until
1944, when I found Mollie and Laura on a Joint Distribution List of people receiving packages.
According to the JDC, Mollie and Laura were then living in Ufa. I now know that Ufa, in far eastern
Siberia, was one of the sites Stalin prepared for the relocation of factories he ordered dismantled,
their parts transported by a railway system he had built years before the anticipated advance of Nazi
troops into Soviet territory, then reconstructed. After Ufa, where Mollie may well have still served as a
translator, I can find nothing of her whereabouts until she sends her first letter home in 1947 >from
Elektrostal, ("electric steel") near Moscow. It turns out that all four places Mollie lived were high
security military/industrial centers.

Would Mollie's apparent support of Stalin, suggested by the 1939 photographs, have been her way of
deflecting any suspicion of her loyalties, and so, assuring her safety in such a place? Does anyone
else have such images in their family memorabilia? Can anyone refer me to historical sources for
images like this one? Or do you have stories about kin who returned to Russia and found themselves
trapped? Even an idealist as impulsive as Mollie must have learned by 1939 how dangerous and
murderous Stalin's regime was, yes?

Also: How would the Joint have found Mollie and sent her a package? Would someone here have
asked /paid for a package for her? Would she have applied >from Ufa? Or would a JDC representative
been sent there?

I am off to the library for books about Americans trapped in the Soviet Union (The Forsaken,
among others) will soon visit the Amtorg papers at the New York Public Library, but in the meantime, I
am eager to learn >from others who may have similar stories in their family history.

Thank you!


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA
http://pklindienst.com/NoOneRemembers Alone

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Romania SIG #Romania Help interpreting photographs of an altar to Stalin sent home to America by a Russian Jew, 1939 #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

In the last ten days a fresh trove of family memorabilia has been sent to me for translation and
interpretation for my ongoing exhibit and book about the SPIWAK family, Jewish immigrants to the US
who fled Czarist Russia. In addition, a piece of troubling news that could unlock the story of one
branch of the family has come to light. I would like help interpreting both.

First, I have posted two images on ViewMate >from this new trove and need help contextualizing them.
The first shows a long room with what appears to be a kind of altar to Stalin at one end. Propaganda
posters adorn a side wall above a display of baskets of fruits and vegetables.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32451

The second shows a group of children dressed as Russian peasants forming a circle around a table with
baskets of fruit. They are posed beneath the portrait / altar to Stalin in the same room.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32452

Both were sent by Mollie MILSTEIN MIASKOFF >from Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in November
1939 and were found among the papers of the cousin who received them. In this second photo,
Mollie's five or six year old daughter, Laura, is the girl in the dress with dark stripes across >from the
camera. On the back of the photos Laura has drawn a house and a butterfly or written sweet notes to her
favorite cousin (among whose papers these were found). The contrast between the front of the
images and the backs is jarring. These photographs feel like propaganda for the good life in the
USSR. No envelopes or letters that go with the images have survived.

How were such stock images made and distributed, and for what purpose? Could these be school
photographs?

Some background. Mollie was born Malca MILSTEIN in Orgeyev, Bessarabia in 1905. Her mother
was Chane SPIWAK; her father Israel MILSTEIN. Mollie emigrated to the US with her parents and
siblings in 1921. She became a naturalized American in 1928, after marrying Reuben MIASKOFF,
also a Russian Jewish immigrant who naturalized. Like many thousands of Americans,
Mollie & Reuben made the terrible decision to move to the Soviet Union during the Great Depression,
persuaded by propaganda that Stalin's Communist regime would provide them with a better living:
good jobs, clean housing, better wages, full equality, and plenty of food. It was a time when many on
the left in the US believed Stalinist propaganda.

Mollie, Reuben, and Laura moved to the Soviet Union around 1935; early 1936 at the latest. I find it
hard (troubling) to believe that Mollie had not, by 1939, had her eyes opened to Stalin and the brutal
reality of life in the Soviet Union, and the fact that she was trapped there. (She was allowed to travel to
the US only once, in the late 1960s, and her daughter was never allowed out.) So I am wondering if the
photographs are calculated to ensure Mollie's safety as a naturalized American working as as
translator in high security offices--convincing censors or suspicious colleagues and neighbors that
Mollie was a true believer. As I understand it (and I am just beginning my research into this) it could
have been dangerous simply to correspond with her family in the US. Comments, please?

Next: In the last week it has come to light that just before Mollie decided to move to the Soviet Union,
she worked as a translator for Amtorg (American Trading Organization) in New York City. Amtorg, it is
now well known, was a cover organization for Soviet industrial espionage as early as the 1920s.
Family elders think it was Amtorg that found Mollie a job in the USSR and that Amtorg may even have
helped pay her family's travel expenses, since no one in the immigrant generation wanted anything
to do with her choice.

Using Mollie's snap shots with dates and place names and the internet, I have begun to piece together
the trajectory of her life in the Soviet Union.

When she moved to the Soviet Union in 1935-36, Mollie lived first in Zaporijie, Ukraine, near the
Dneiper River, the site of brand new metallurgical works (created with materials and plans stolen from
or given by American corporations), and the famous hydroelectric dam. She then
moved (or was ordered to move?) to Stupino, in Moscow oblast, in 1939. Stupino was a "closed city"
that appeared on no map or railroad timetable. It was the locus of a strategically important Soviet
airfield and the war in Europe had begun. One needed a KGB clearance to live there.
There is nothing at all >from or about Mollie >from 1940 (when she sent more photos home) until
1944, when I found Mollie and Laura on a Joint Distribution List of people receiving packages.
According to the JDC, Mollie and Laura were then living in Ufa. I now know that Ufa, in far eastern
Siberia, was one of the sites Stalin prepared for the relocation of factories he ordered dismantled,
their parts transported by a railway system he had built years before the anticipated advance of Nazi
troops into Soviet territory, then reconstructed. After Ufa, where Mollie may well have still served as a
translator, I can find nothing of her whereabouts until she sends her first letter home in 1947 >from
Elektrostal, ("electric steel") near Moscow. It turns out that all four places Mollie lived were high
security military/industrial centers.

Would Mollie's apparent support of Stalin, suggested by the 1939 photographs, have been her way of
deflecting any suspicion of her loyalties, and so, assuring her safety in such a place? Does anyone
else have such images in their family memorabilia? Can anyone refer me to historical sources for
images like this one? Or do you have stories about kin who returned to Russia and found themselves
trapped? Even an idealist as impulsive as Mollie must have learned by 1939 how dangerous and
murderous Stalin's regime was, yes?

Also: How would the Joint have found Mollie and sent her a package? Would someone here have
asked /paid for a package for her? Would she have applied >from Ufa? Or would a JDC representative
been sent there?

I am off to the library for books about Americans trapped in the Soviet Union (The Forsaken,
among others) will soon visit the Amtorg papers at the New York Public Library, but in the meantime, I
am eager to learn >from others who may have similar stories in their family history.

Thank you!


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA
http://pklindienst.com/NoOneRemembers Alone

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US. SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev & Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti. TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


ViewMate Photo Dating Request #romania

Carol Hochstadt
 

Dear Fellow Genners,
I've posted two related photos in the ViewMate gallery.
I believe that the solo photo of the boy was reproduced in New York
from the photo of the family - which was taken previously in Jassy,
Romania. Perhaps he passed away and the family wanted the solo photo
as a remembrance?
In my quest to figure out the identity of these family members, it
would be very helpful to get approximate dates of both photos.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32481
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32482

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Many thanks in advance for your help!
Carol Hochstadt, Salt Lake City UT


Romania SIG #Romania ViewMate Photo Dating Request #romania

Carol Hochstadt
 

Dear Fellow Genners,
I've posted two related photos in the ViewMate gallery.
I believe that the solo photo of the boy was reproduced in New York
from the photo of the family - which was taken previously in Jassy,
Romania. Perhaps he passed away and the family wanted the solo photo
as a remembrance?
In my quest to figure out the identity of these family members, it
would be very helpful to get approximate dates of both photos.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32481
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM32482

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Many thanks in advance for your help!
Carol Hochstadt, Salt Lake City UT


Yasse, Romania #romania

Elaine Frank <efrank76@...>
 

I have just started doing my genealogy research and have run into a block. One of my grandfathers
came >from Yasse, Romania and I can't find that town in
google. Does anyone know if the name and/or country has changed. Thanks for your help.

Elaine Frank
efrank76@...


Romania SIG #Romania Yasse, Romania #romania

Elaine Frank <efrank76@...>
 

I have just started doing my genealogy research and have run into a block. One of my grandfathers
came >from Yasse, Romania and I can't find that town in
google. Does anyone know if the name and/or country has changed. Thanks for your help.

Elaine Frank
efrank76@...


Paris 2012 post Conference Newsletter special proceedings #poland #warsaw

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

July 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive (www.genealoj.org)
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@... )

Post Conference Newsletter ***Special "Proceedings"***
February 27, 2014

The Proceedings of the 32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy are almost all available

You will find there everything you liked so much (or missed!) during
those 4 exciting days of July 2012

• Almost complete French-English bilingualism;
• A particular focus on Europe, its medieval settlements, its
cemeteries, its archives;
• A unique look at the genealogy and history of the Sephardic as
well as the Ashkenazi communities;
• All aspects of your researches: history, resources, legacy
preservation, transmission, nature and nurture, fancy genealogies,
origin and identity, genetics, the Holocaust, ethics, biblical
genealogies and of course methodology;
• Speakers >from all over the world.

Some *150 texts* have been collected into *4 volumes* with bibliographies,
documents...
***
- Volume 1: **The Western World**: 32 texts relating to France, Western
Europe (including Italy but not Spain), the United States and Israel. 330
pages – completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French volume).
*Available*
***
- Volume 2: **Central and Eastern Europe**: (including Germany and Austria).
37 papers, 292 pages - completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French
volume). *Available*
***
- Volume 3: **Sephardic, Middle-East, and African areas**: 57 papers or
summaries, 506 pages, some texts are translated, others are in their
original language accompanied by abstracts in the other language (1
bilingual volume). *Available before the end of February*
***
- Volume 4: Thematic lectures (Holocaust, genetics, ethics...) and
Methodological workshops (genealogical travels, use of pictures, publishing,
deciphering Hebrew, software)... About 35 papers. Completely translated (1
English volume - 1 French volume). This volume is *still in preparation*.
***
Volumes can be ordered *separately or together* in *hard copy* or on *digital
support*. Hard copies are available *in color* and in *black & white*.
If you buy a hard copy you will also receive the corresponding digitized
version.

Contact CGJ - 45 rue La Bruyère 75009 Paris - +33 (0) 1 40 23 04 90 -
secretariat@... – www.genealoj.org


Secure on-line Conference Family Finder #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

One of the exciting advances for this summer's IAJGS Conference will
be an on-line Conference Family Finder. The Family Finder will provide
a wide range of search options as well as offering the ability to
browse, page-by-page. It will protect privacy of those who
submit their input. Additionally, it will be available well before the
conference so that registrants can make contact and arrange to get
together at the conference. For more information, please click
on the following link: http://conference.iajgs.org/2014/faq.cfm/#Conf0.

Hal Bookbinder, lead co-Chair
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


World War I Family Story Upload Feature is now Available on the IAJGS Conference Website! #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

The theme of the upcoming IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy is the 100th Anniversary of the start of World War I. To
commemorate this event, the Conference is offering registrants (both
those who will attend the conference in Salt Lake City and those who
register to access it LIVE! over the Internet) the chance to share
their Family?s World War I era stories and photos. Stories may relate
to military service, the disruption caused by fighting, forced
relocation, emigration, or other topics related to this era.

Now is the time to write your story and gather your pictures. You may
upload your story and related photos using the World War I Story
Upload feature on the Conference website, www.iajgs2014.org . The
purpose of this feature is to allow the Conference Committee to gather
all of your stories and memories into a unique online exhibit and
possibly a printed memory book. We also plan a World War I picture
display at the Conference.

To use the World War I Story Upload Feature you must first register
for the conference. Then, use the Registration Update feature to
upload your story and associated pictures. You will need your
registration email and password to log into the Registration Update
feature. If you have forgotten your password, the Registration Update
page has a "Forgot password" function. We will periodically extract
stories to share through social media (Discussion Forum, Blog,
Facebook and Twitter). We envision cutting off updates as of June 15,
2014 to allow time to create the online exhibit for the conference.

Hal Bookbinder, Lead Conference co-Chair,
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Salt Lake City, UT
7/27-8/1/2014
www.iajgs2014.org


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Paris 2012 post Conference Newsletter special proceedings #warsaw #poland

Congrès Paris 2012 Généaloj
 

July 15-18 2012
32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy hosted by The
French Cercle de Genealogie Juive (www.genealoj.org)
(www.paris2012.eu – contact@... )

Post Conference Newsletter ***Special "Proceedings"***
February 27, 2014

The Proceedings of the 32nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy are almost all available

You will find there everything you liked so much (or missed!) during
those 4 exciting days of July 2012

• Almost complete French-English bilingualism;
• A particular focus on Europe, its medieval settlements, its
cemeteries, its archives;
• A unique look at the genealogy and history of the Sephardic as
well as the Ashkenazi communities;
• All aspects of your researches: history, resources, legacy
preservation, transmission, nature and nurture, fancy genealogies,
origin and identity, genetics, the Holocaust, ethics, biblical
genealogies and of course methodology;
• Speakers >from all over the world.

Some *150 texts* have been collected into *4 volumes* with bibliographies,
documents...
***
- Volume 1: **The Western World**: 32 texts relating to France, Western
Europe (including Italy but not Spain), the United States and Israel. 330
pages – completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French volume).
*Available*
***
- Volume 2: **Central and Eastern Europe**: (including Germany and Austria).
37 papers, 292 pages - completely translated (1 English volume - 1 French
volume). *Available*
***
- Volume 3: **Sephardic, Middle-East, and African areas**: 57 papers or
summaries, 506 pages, some texts are translated, others are in their
original language accompanied by abstracts in the other language (1
bilingual volume). *Available before the end of February*
***
- Volume 4: Thematic lectures (Holocaust, genetics, ethics...) and
Methodological workshops (genealogical travels, use of pictures, publishing,
deciphering Hebrew, software)... About 35 papers. Completely translated (1
English volume - 1 French volume). This volume is *still in preparation*.
***
Volumes can be ordered *separately or together* in *hard copy* or on *digital
support*. Hard copies are available *in color* and in *black & white*.
If you buy a hard copy you will also receive the corresponding digitized
version.

Contact CGJ - 45 rue La Bruyère 75009 Paris - +33 (0) 1 40 23 04 90 -
secretariat@... – www.genealoj.org


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Secure on-line Conference Family Finder #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

One of the exciting advances for this summer's IAJGS Conference will
be an on-line Conference Family Finder. The Family Finder will provide
a wide range of search options as well as offering the ability to
browse, page-by-page. It will protect privacy of those who
submit their input. Additionally, it will be available well before the
conference so that registrants can make contact and arrange to get
together at the conference. For more information, please click
on the following link: http://conference.iajgs.org/2014/faq.cfm/#Conf0.

Hal Bookbinder, lead co-Chair
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland World War I Family Story Upload Feature is now Available on the IAJGS Conference Website! #warsaw #poland

Hal Bookbinder
 

The theme of the upcoming IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy is the 100th Anniversary of the start of World War I. To
commemorate this event, the Conference is offering registrants (both
those who will attend the conference in Salt Lake City and those who
register to access it LIVE! over the Internet) the chance to share
their Family?s World War I era stories and photos. Stories may relate
to military service, the disruption caused by fighting, forced
relocation, emigration, or other topics related to this era.

Now is the time to write your story and gather your pictures. You may
upload your story and related photos using the World War I Story
Upload feature on the Conference website, www.iajgs2014.org . The
purpose of this feature is to allow the Conference Committee to gather
all of your stories and memories into a unique online exhibit and
possibly a printed memory book. We also plan a World War I picture
display at the Conference.

To use the World War I Story Upload Feature you must first register
for the conference. Then, use the Registration Update feature to
upload your story and associated pictures. You will need your
registration email and password to log into the Registration Update
feature. If you have forgotten your password, the Registration Update
page has a "Forgot password" function. We will periodically extract
stories to share through social media (Discussion Forum, Blog,
Facebook and Twitter). We envision cutting off updates as of June 15,
2014 to allow time to create the online exhibit for the conference.

Hal Bookbinder, Lead Conference co-Chair,
34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
Salt Lake City, UT
7/27-8/1/2014
www.iajgs2014.org

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