Date   

David Kalman Weintraub - somewhere in the US #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

David Kalman Weintraub, his wife Henie (Katz) and their children left
Kozlov (E. Galicia) and went to the US, sometime before WWI. (I have not
found them in either the Ellis Island database or the Hamburg database.)

One son, Isaac, returned to Galicia and married. He and his family were
killed in Skalat, save one daughter who now lives in Israel.

She has no idea where in the US her father's family lived, but if anyone
is familiar with a David Kalman Weintraub, wife Henie, at least two sons
(Pinkas and Hersch), she would be pleased to hear. Some of their children
were born 1877-1883, which give some idea of their ages.

Israel Pickholtz

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


KAPLAN furniture store in Boston, 1940s/1950s #general

vze4yr5c@...
 

My family history on my father's side includes one of those weird *name
change* episodes (that so many of us have) in Lithuania sometime in the
1850s or later. Supposedly a young man with the surname KAPLANSKY was
paid to take the place of someone with the last name SHAVLANSKY (or
something similar) in the army. This was in Siauliai, or Shavel. The
story gets fuzzy, but it's more or less that the new Mr. SHAVLANSKY joined
the army but somehow managed to desert and survive. However, he kept his
new name and moved around, resettling in Sakiai (Shaki). It was probably
his son, years later, who immigrated to Boston in 1890. This was my pgf,
Joseph SAVALANSKY (later shortened to SAVAL).

Now fast forward to the 1940s/1950s. My older sister recently told me
that she remembers that our dad, Meyer SAVAL (one of Joseph's 6 children),
when driving through an area of Boston sort of near the retail downtown
and Chinatown area, pointed out a furniture store with the name KAPLAN on
it and claimed it was owned by cousins who still had that name. Is there
anyone out there who remembers anything about that store or that family?

I would love to investigate this possible family connection. Please reply
privately.

Lois Saval Finstein
lois.finstein2@verizon.net
Researcher #9111
Researching SAVAL, SAVALANSKY, MEYERS, LIFSCHITZ, KOPELMAN


Skalater meeting in NYC 1978 #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Does anyone know anything about a meeting of Skalaters in New York in 1978?

What they did, who attended etc?

Israel Pickholtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen David Kalman Weintraub - somewhere in the US #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

David Kalman Weintraub, his wife Henie (Katz) and their children left
Kozlov (E. Galicia) and went to the US, sometime before WWI. (I have not
found them in either the Ellis Island database or the Hamburg database.)

One son, Isaac, returned to Galicia and married. He and his family were
killed in Skalat, save one daughter who now lives in Israel.

She has no idea where in the US her father's family lived, but if anyone
is familiar with a David Kalman Weintraub, wife Henie, at least two sons
(Pinkas and Hersch), she would be pleased to hear. Some of their children
were born 1877-1883, which give some idea of their ages.

Israel Pickholtz

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KAPLAN furniture store in Boston, 1940s/1950s #general

vze4yr5c@...
 

My family history on my father's side includes one of those weird *name
change* episodes (that so many of us have) in Lithuania sometime in the
1850s or later. Supposedly a young man with the surname KAPLANSKY was
paid to take the place of someone with the last name SHAVLANSKY (or
something similar) in the army. This was in Siauliai, or Shavel. The
story gets fuzzy, but it's more or less that the new Mr. SHAVLANSKY joined
the army but somehow managed to desert and survive. However, he kept his
new name and moved around, resettling in Sakiai (Shaki). It was probably
his son, years later, who immigrated to Boston in 1890. This was my pgf,
Joseph SAVALANSKY (later shortened to SAVAL).

Now fast forward to the 1940s/1950s. My older sister recently told me
that she remembers that our dad, Meyer SAVAL (one of Joseph's 6 children),
when driving through an area of Boston sort of near the retail downtown
and Chinatown area, pointed out a furniture store with the name KAPLAN on
it and claimed it was owned by cousins who still had that name. Is there
anyone out there who remembers anything about that store or that family?

I would love to investigate this possible family connection. Please reply
privately.

Lois Saval Finstein
lois.finstein2@verizon.net
Researcher #9111
Researching SAVAL, SAVALANSKY, MEYERS, LIFSCHITZ, KOPELMAN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Skalater meeting in NYC 1978 #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Does anyone know anything about a meeting of Skalaters in New York in 1978?

What they did, who attended etc?

Israel Pickholtz


KREISKOL(KRUSKAL) #unitedkingdom

Chaim freedman
 

I am trying to trace Hirsh KREISKOL(son of Moshe) who was reputed to be a
rabbi and chazan in London in 1876-1894. His grandfather was Rabbi Yechezkel
who lived in Laukava and Vainuty, Lithuania abou 1840-1865.


Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
email: chaimjan@zahav.net.il

Moderator Note: Don't forget JG's Rabbinic SIG (www.jewishgen.org/Rabbinic)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom KREISKOL(KRUSKAL) #unitedkingdom

Chaim freedman
 

I am trying to trace Hirsh KREISKOL(son of Moshe) who was reputed to be a
rabbi and chazan in London in 1876-1894. His grandfather was Rabbi Yechezkel
who lived in Laukava and Vainuty, Lithuania abou 1840-1865.


Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
email: chaimjan@zahav.net.il

Moderator Note: Don't forget JG's Rabbinic SIG (www.jewishgen.org/Rabbinic)


Yizkor Book update-December 2002 and annual #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

I took a two-week vacation >from Dec. 20- Jan. 4 and I have just
about crawled my way out >from under a mountain of emails that poured
in during my absence. Hence, the delay in writing the monthly update
for the Yizkor Book Project. It's great to get away but hard to
return to an avalanche of mail. To those of you who wrote me during
my absence, please give me a few more days to reply!!!

A reminder to new JewishGen researchers: all translations can be
found at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and a
description of the Yizkor Book Project as well as the FAQ, database,
libraries, and other matters can be accessed >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/.

During December 2002 we added 3 books, 2 new entries , and 11 updates.

New books:

-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Suprasl, Poland
-Tomaszow, Poland

New entries:

-Dorosauti, Romania (Pinkas HaKehillot Romania)
-Poddebice, Poland (Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1)

Updates:

-Buchach, Ukraine
-Gorodenka (Horodenka), Ukraine
-Lida, Belarus
-Miklulintsy, Ukraine
-Pinsk, Belarus
-Radekhov, Ukraine
-Rokitnoye, Ukraine
-Rozniatow, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Sokoly, Poland
-Staszow, Poland

2002 was a productive year for the Yizkor Book Project. We added 29
new books and 97 entries, and updated 188 books. We had
approximately 270,000 hits in December and over 2.8 million hits to
the web site for the year, a record.

All this would not have been possible without the dedicated volunteer
Yizkor Book Staff, especially Lance Ackerfeld, the generous donors
who contributed translations, the incredibly hard-working and
talented project coordinators, and finally the financial donors whose
contributions allowed us to hire translators.

A Happy and Peaceful New Year to you all. We look forward to another
successful year.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Yizkor Book update-December 2002 and annual #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

I took a two-week vacation >from Dec. 20- Jan. 4 and I have just
about crawled my way out >from under a mountain of emails that poured
in during my absence. Hence, the delay in writing the monthly update
for the Yizkor Book Project. It's great to get away but hard to
return to an avalanche of mail. To those of you who wrote me during
my absence, please give me a few more days to reply!!!

A reminder to new JewishGen researchers: all translations can be
found at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and a
description of the Yizkor Book Project as well as the FAQ, database,
libraries, and other matters can be accessed >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/.

During December 2002 we added 3 books, 2 new entries , and 11 updates.

New books:

-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Suprasl, Poland
-Tomaszow, Poland

New entries:

-Dorosauti, Romania (Pinkas HaKehillot Romania)
-Poddebice, Poland (Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1)

Updates:

-Buchach, Ukraine
-Gorodenka (Horodenka), Ukraine
-Lida, Belarus
-Miklulintsy, Ukraine
-Pinsk, Belarus
-Radekhov, Ukraine
-Rokitnoye, Ukraine
-Rozniatow, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Sokoly, Poland
-Staszow, Poland

2002 was a productive year for the Yizkor Book Project. We added 29
new books and 97 entries, and updated 188 books. We had
approximately 270,000 hits in December and over 2.8 million hits to
the web site for the year, a record.

All this would not have been possible without the dedicated volunteer
Yizkor Book Staff, especially Lance Ackerfeld, the generous donors
who contributed translations, the incredibly hard-working and
talented project coordinators, and finally the financial donors whose
contributions allowed us to hire translators.

A Happy and Peaceful New Year to you all. We look forward to another
successful year.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Thank you for translating Germans professions kaufmann, handelsmann and handler #general

Fred Zimmak <Fred.Zimmak@...>
 

Hello

I would like to thank everyone that helped me with translations and
understandings of those words.

I think the mail >from Edward Konig and Irene Newhouse said most of it. I
have understand the differences. But you don't know what the really did.
But you have to ask silly questions to learn something.

Kindly

Fred Zimmak / Sweden - Stockholm

Seeking information about:
HOFER, FEST, Schrattenberg, Loweraustria. (Not Jews!)
STEINER, Leletice (or Drahenice?), Prachensky, Czech repulic
EHRLICH, Drahenice, Prachensky, Czech repulic
ROSENBERG, COHN, Sztum, Elblaskie, Poland
GOLDSCHMIDT, ROSENBERG, Tczew, Gdanskie, Poland
SIMSON, ZIMMAK, TZEMACH, Dabrowno, Olsztynskie, Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thank you for translating Germans professions kaufmann, handelsmann and handler #general

Fred Zimmak <Fred.Zimmak@...>
 

Hello

I would like to thank everyone that helped me with translations and
understandings of those words.

I think the mail >from Edward Konig and Irene Newhouse said most of it. I
have understand the differences. But you don't know what the really did.
But you have to ask silly questions to learn something.

Kindly

Fred Zimmak / Sweden - Stockholm

Seeking information about:
HOFER, FEST, Schrattenberg, Loweraustria. (Not Jews!)
STEINER, Leletice (or Drahenice?), Prachensky, Czech repulic
EHRLICH, Drahenice, Prachensky, Czech repulic
ROSENBERG, COHN, Sztum, Elblaskie, Poland
GOLDSCHMIDT, ROSENBERG, Tczew, Gdanskie, Poland
SIMSON, ZIMMAK, TZEMACH, Dabrowno, Olsztynskie, Poland


Re: MEIZELS of Vilna #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

On 2003.01.07, Lainey Melnick <lmelnick@austin.rr.com> wrote:

Thanks so much to Chaim Freedman for supplying me with some great
information on my MEISELS branch >from IR Vilna.
[...]
Here is basically the newest information if anyone now sees
something that they can add:
Yaakov Yisrael MEISELS of Vilna had a son, Mordecai MEISELS.
[...]
I am afraid that Lainey Melnick's interpretation of my posting is
incorrect.

I suggest plotting out my listing to clarify the links.

One major point - Yaakov Yisrael was not a MEIZELS, nor was his son
Mordekhai. Mordekhai's wife was a sister of Avraham Shimon Hagadol
PREGER, whose son Arye had a daughter Pesia, married Moshe (ben
Mordekhai, a different person >from the above Mordekhai) MEIZELS.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
mailto:chaimjan@zahav.net.il


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: MEIZELS of Vilna #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

On 2003.01.07, Lainey Melnick <lmelnick@austin.rr.com> wrote:

Thanks so much to Chaim Freedman for supplying me with some great
information on my MEISELS branch >from IR Vilna.
[...]
Here is basically the newest information if anyone now sees
something that they can add:
Yaakov Yisrael MEISELS of Vilna had a son, Mordecai MEISELS.
[...]
I am afraid that Lainey Melnick's interpretation of my posting is
incorrect.

I suggest plotting out my listing to clarify the links.

One major point - Yaakov Yisrael was not a MEIZELS, nor was his son
Mordekhai. Mordekhai's wife was a sister of Avraham Shimon Hagadol
PREGER, whose son Arye had a daughter Pesia, married Moshe (ben
Mordekhai, a different person >from the above Mordekhai) MEIZELS.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
mailto:chaimjan@zahav.net.il


KREISKOL/KRUSKAL #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

I am trying to trace Hirsh KREISKOL (son of Moshe) who was reputed
to be a rabbi and chazan in London in 1876-1894. His grandfather was
Rabbi Yechezkel who lived in Laukava and Vainuty, Lithuania about
1840-1865.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
mailto:chaimjan@zahav.net.il


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic KREISKOL/KRUSKAL #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

I am trying to trace Hirsh KREISKOL (son of Moshe) who was reputed
to be a rabbi and chazan in London in 1876-1894. His grandfather was
Rabbi Yechezkel who lived in Laukava and Vainuty, Lithuania about
1840-1865.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
mailto:chaimjan@zahav.net.il


New relationship issues: "auxilliaries" at the wedding #general

MBernet@...
 

In a recent posting, a non-English-speaking genealogist asked what terms
are used in English that would denote both the "best man" and the person
who "gives the bride away.

Let's start off with a definition first. My dictionary says the best man
is "the chief attendant of the bridegroom at a wedding." Which, of
course, defines nothing.

In Jewish tradition the marriage is an acquisition by contract. It dates
back to when a daughter was the "property" of her parents until "acquired"
by contract and by a symbolic act of purchase, by the groom.

In the traditional wedding ceremony, before the wedding takes place, the
closest male relative of the bride (or a close male friend) and the groom,
meet in the presence of the two male witnesses. The ketuba is discussed or
read, and then an object (usually a fresh handkerchief) is tendered by
this representative of the bride (the "seller") for the groom to reach out
to and stretch toward himself (the "purchaser"). That is the ancient
symbol of acquisition.

Whether and how the father and mother of the bride lead her under the
marriage canopy is a matter of local or community custom. The best man is
not required in the traditional ceremony. It is customary in many
communities for the best man to be a good friend of the groom, who
accompanies him to the canopy. Generally he is given the "role" of
holding the bride's wedding ring. At the right moment the groom turns to
him and nervously whispers "give me the ring." Traditionally the groom
takes the ring and shows it to two witnesses (any two, often the rabbi and
the bride's father) and asks "is it worth a prutah?" (the smallest coin of
the realm--the least value that can feature in a legitimate acquisition).
The two explore it lightly and hand it back saying, "worth a prutah," and
the groom can then slip it on the bride's finger at the appropriate point
saying "with this ring I betroth you according to law"--and at that moment
the "acquisition" is completed.

Clearly the role of "best man" and of the "person who gives away the
bride" are totally unrelated, and there is no all- encompassing term in
English. "auxiliaries," "sponsors," "co-celebrants" might be employed at a
pinch--but they'll have to be explained. There's a Hebrew term, Shoshvan
(pl shoshvanim), that means "sponsor" or "second" (i.e. in a duel), and is
used for best man.

We can add to the pool of potential names for candidates in wedding
ceremonies, the bridesmaids, flower girls, pages, ring boy . . . .

Essentially, though, the two roles are so dissimilar, that finding an all
encompassing term is about as easy as finding one term that covers both a
therometer and an apricot.

Michael Bernet, New York


SALTZMAN in Israel #general

Tamar Gold <trgold@...>
 

I am trying to find whatever became of my father's uncle, Rabbi Hershel
Saltzman? He would travel to America, and possibly elsewhere, raising
funds for his Yeshiva in Israel. This would have been in the
1930's-1950's. He was married more than once. Any suggestions of how to
proceed with my search? Does Israel have a death index, like the SSDI in
America?

Tamar Gold
Elizabeth, N.J., USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New relationship issues: "auxilliaries" at the wedding #general

MBernet@...
 

In a recent posting, a non-English-speaking genealogist asked what terms
are used in English that would denote both the "best man" and the person
who "gives the bride away.

Let's start off with a definition first. My dictionary says the best man
is "the chief attendant of the bridegroom at a wedding." Which, of
course, defines nothing.

In Jewish tradition the marriage is an acquisition by contract. It dates
back to when a daughter was the "property" of her parents until "acquired"
by contract and by a symbolic act of purchase, by the groom.

In the traditional wedding ceremony, before the wedding takes place, the
closest male relative of the bride (or a close male friend) and the groom,
meet in the presence of the two male witnesses. The ketuba is discussed or
read, and then an object (usually a fresh handkerchief) is tendered by
this representative of the bride (the "seller") for the groom to reach out
to and stretch toward himself (the "purchaser"). That is the ancient
symbol of acquisition.

Whether and how the father and mother of the bride lead her under the
marriage canopy is a matter of local or community custom. The best man is
not required in the traditional ceremony. It is customary in many
communities for the best man to be a good friend of the groom, who
accompanies him to the canopy. Generally he is given the "role" of
holding the bride's wedding ring. At the right moment the groom turns to
him and nervously whispers "give me the ring." Traditionally the groom
takes the ring and shows it to two witnesses (any two, often the rabbi and
the bride's father) and asks "is it worth a prutah?" (the smallest coin of
the realm--the least value that can feature in a legitimate acquisition).
The two explore it lightly and hand it back saying, "worth a prutah," and
the groom can then slip it on the bride's finger at the appropriate point
saying "with this ring I betroth you according to law"--and at that moment
the "acquisition" is completed.

Clearly the role of "best man" and of the "person who gives away the
bride" are totally unrelated, and there is no all- encompassing term in
English. "auxiliaries," "sponsors," "co-celebrants" might be employed at a
pinch--but they'll have to be explained. There's a Hebrew term, Shoshvan
(pl shoshvanim), that means "sponsor" or "second" (i.e. in a duel), and is
used for best man.

We can add to the pool of potential names for candidates in wedding
ceremonies, the bridesmaids, flower girls, pages, ring boy . . . .

Essentially, though, the two roles are so dissimilar, that finding an all
encompassing term is about as easy as finding one term that covers both a
therometer and an apricot.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SALTZMAN in Israel #general

Tamar Gold <trgold@...>
 

I am trying to find whatever became of my father's uncle, Rabbi Hershel
Saltzman? He would travel to America, and possibly elsewhere, raising
funds for his Yeshiva in Israel. This would have been in the
1930's-1950's. He was married more than once. Any suggestions of how to
proceed with my search? Does Israel have a death index, like the SSDI in
America?

Tamar Gold
Elizabeth, N.J., USA