Date   

Re: POHORYLES, NIEDERMAYER, et al.

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

Thank you, Valentin,

I’d be most appreciative of seeing the Brillants’ graves and the Niedermayer’s papers.  

My email address is:  bsmannlein@....

Isn’t Sde Yehosua a military cemetery?  How can civilians be buried there?

Best wishes from Tucson, Arizona,

Barbara



On Jan 3, 2020, at 10:20 AM, Valentin Lupu <lupuval@...> wrote:

Hi Barbara,
I located the graves of: Rachel and Yakob Osias Niedermayer as well as Ruth and Maximilian Brillant's (the name Brillant is the correct one as spelled in the graves and in the Niedermayers citizenship documents).
I didn't find yet Mor's grave.
Here is the information you're interested on:
Rachel Niedermayer: born to Tzvi Pohoryles in Husyatin, Poland, August 4, 1887, Passed away on April 11, 1976. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Yakob Ozias (Yehoshua) Niedermayer: born to Chaim Naftali in Kotzmann, Austria, February 2, 1884. Passed away on March 7, 1968.  Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Ruth Brillant: born to Rachel and Yakov in 1919. Passed away on July 3, 2002. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Maximilian Brillant: born to Leah and Victor in 1907. Passed away on September 15, 2005. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
I can send photos of the graves as well as the Niedermayer's citizenship documents (Palestine, 1947) if you let me know your email address.
Valentin Lupu
Israel
_._,_._,_


Re: POHORYLES, NIEDERMAYER, et al.

Jane Neff Rollins
 

Hello Barbara,

My Aunt Joan Share's maiden name was Pohoryles, and her people were from Husiatyn. She lives in the Philadelphia area. Are you related to her?

Jane

Jane Neff Rollins
Montrose CA USA
Locations -- Surnames
Tiraspol -- Kishinevsky, Zeilikovich, Sirota
Slonim/Volkovysk/Svisloch -- Klebansky, Vatnik 
Berdichev -- Chernorudsky
Zhitomir -- Pekler, Gumenik, Gorlovsky, Garber


Re: הנושא: [JewishGen.org] Who has access to the LDS library? (I need a microfilm)

Barbara S. Weitz
 

Israel doesn’t have an LDS Family Center.  The closest one is in Cyprus.  There’s one here in Asheville, NC.  Tell me what you need and I’ll try to go there and find it.

 

Prof. Barbara Weitz

Retired, Florida International University

Director of Film Studies

Director of Czech Studies Pgm

http://10hvezd.cz/en/

Current residence: 

123 Thurland Av

Asheville, NC 28803

 

 


Re: USCIS questions

Renée K. Carl
 

Robert

It is not known when the proposed fees would be put in place, if at all. The immediate next step is for USCIS to review all the comments, weigh the evidence, and make decisions. The group of us at Records Not Revenue is keeping an eye on things, as is RPAC and others.

The USCIS Genealogy Program maintains information on this website: https://www.uscis.gov/genealogy. I suggest reviewing things there. As Mark said, it's not about when they arrived, though that can be a factor, it is more about when and if they naturalized. There are many, many "it depends..." but here are some basics to keep in mind:

If they were alive and NOT naturalized in 1940, when registration of Aliens began, they would have an Alien Registration Form
If they naturalized after 1944, they would have an A-file. Note that many A-files are in the process of going from USCIS to NARA-Kansas City or San Bruno, or are already there.
If they naturalized, they would have a C-file, but depending on when, the C-file won't contain more than the 3 forms of the Naturalization process available at various NARA locations.
Arrival after 1924? Visa files
Issues finding landing papers? Registry file.

There are other unique cases, such as you need to make an index search request if you think there might be an extant Board of Special Inquiry case file related to deportation hearings. Or, as in the case of my grandfather, he arrived as a child, naturalized under his father, as was the law at the time. However, when my grandfather was in his late 60s, he wrote to what was then INS to request a copy of his naturalization certificate, and to ask if his father's file gave information on proof of my grandfather's birth, as he needed to prove to Social Security his age in order to get his benefits. This created a whole slew of forms and papers that gave me details about my grandfather no one had before seen, such as a letter from the school board stating his age in first grade and the name of the school.

Every request made to USCIS is for an individual, so 4 grandparents and 2 greats = 6 requests. An index search is $65 and the copy of the resulting findings is also $65, though again, there are several "it depends" situations.

I hope this helps
Renee Carl
Washington DC

CARL/CARROLL/KAROL Volhynia, Boston, St Louis
LERNER Sudylkiv, Boston, St. Louis
KATSCHER/KATHER/KETCHER Vidzy, Daugavpils, NYC, St. Louis
POLINSKY/POLUNSKY Ariogala, St. Louis


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Ina Getzoff
 

Is there anyone in your family that is still alive and might be able to help you begin looking back?  Do you have any pictures or paperwork regarding your parents that might be of help? Lately, many stories have been coming out after DNA testing that the parents that "we" thought were our biological parents actually are not. You don't indicate how old you are or where you grew up or with whom since you were very young when your mother passed away or if you actually knew your father. Those are questions that need to be answered and might be answered by the family that you lived with. 
Please post more information so our group can try and help you.
Ina Getzoff
JGSPBCI Secretary
Delray Beach, Fla.


Searching for the grave of my uncle in Israel

Pavel Ravitsky
 

I’m searching for the grave of my uncle Meer ben Pinchas Rozentsvaig in Israel. He immigrated from Kishinev to Israel in 1975. His address in Israel was St. Hertzel 45/13, Akko. He probably past away in 1999. Who know what database should I search?


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

jbonline1111@...
 

My step-grandmother had many family members who had emigrated from Russia to Mexico when they were not allowed to enter the United States.  Elise may well be correct.


Re: הנושא: [JewishGen.org] Who has access to the LDS library? (I need a microfilm)

Sally Bruckheimer
 

There are no more films (unless they are on hold from before). Now everything is being digitized and available online on LDS libraries or to LDS members. The film numbers are no good anymore.


Re: INSEE Death Index 1970-2019 Available Online #france

Joachim MODERN <joachim.modern@...>
 

Hello

It is easier and cheaper to use the data >from the official URL:
https://www.data.gouv.fr/fr/datasets/fichier-des-personnes-decedees/

All years have been concentrated in one CSV file.

Best regards
Joachim Modern (France)


----------------

If you have ancestors or family members who died in France between 1970
and 2019 you will find this dataset of interest .The National Institute
of Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut national de la
statistique et des Etudes Economiques), abbreviated INSEE, has released
the index of all persons who were deceased in France >from 1970 to 2019.
I searched using Geneanet <https://en.geneanet.org>


Help with Dutch?French translation #france

Rivka Horowitz
 

I am tracing my cousin Samuel BALIN's path to America >from Fiume,
Italy via Belgium ca 1926. I have located immigration papers from
Antwerp and am requesting help translating part of the immigration
packet. The file is at ViewMate at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76483.
Thank you for any help you can provide.

Rivka Horowitz
Niantic, CT
USA


Finding deceased info via the Jewish Center in Galati/Galatz #romania

barchaims@juno.com <barchaims@...>
 

Subject: Deceased info >from Galati via Jewish Center


The office of the Jewish Center in Galati is managed by Mrs. Violeta
Blumer. Her phone no.is: 075-250-0046 Romania.

Jewish Center email address: Comunitate_Galati@yahoo.com.

Omri I wish you success in your search.

Motty Bar-Chaim
Florida


Re: POHORYLES, NIEDERMAYER, et al.

Valentin Lupu
 

Hi Barbara,
I located the graves of: Rachel and Yakob Osias Niedermayer as well as Ruth and Maximilian Brillant's (the name Brillant is the correct one as spelled in the graves and in the Niedermayers citizenship documents).
I didn't find yet Mor's grave.
Here is the information you're interested on:
Rachel Niedermayer: born to Tzvi Pohoryles in Husyatin, Poland, August 4, 1887, Passed away on April 11, 1976. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Yakob Ozias (Yehoshua) Niedermayer: born to Chaim Naftali in Kotzmann, Austria, February 2, 1884. Passed away on March 7, 1968.  Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Ruth Brillant: born to Rachel and Yakov in 1919. Passed away on July 3, 2002. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Maximilian Brillant: born to Leah and Victor in 1907. Passed away on September 15, 2005. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
I can send photos of the graves as well as the Niedermayer's citizenship documents (Palestine, 1947) if you let me know your email address.
Valentin Lupu
Israel


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Robert Heuman
 

My Daughter in Law was born in Mexico City and so were her siblings and
several of her ancestors... and they are definitely Ashkenazi Jewish
from Germany, Poland and Russia when their ancestors are sought. There
is a sizable Jewish community in Mexico City...

RsH


On Fri, 03 Jan 2020 07:40:48 -0800, you wrote:

It is quite possible that he was indeed from Mexico, as there has long been a Jewish community there.  I have known Jewish immigrants from Mexico  to the USA who were Spanish speaking.

TorontoRSH
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Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Sue Frank
 

Jews from Mexico were more likely to have Sephardic origins than Ashkenazi. 

Sue Frank


On 3 Jan 2020, at 14:41, gandmbc via Groups.Jewishgen.Org <gandmbc=yahoo.co.uk@...> wrote:

I was told by a DNA relative that I have a Jewish female ancestor on my father's side. He was Irish and from a rural part of Ireland. How on earth did a Jewish woman come to marry somebody from the wilds of the west of Ireland? I found a likely candidate, but can't seem to take it any further as I cannot find any information about her name (it's very unusual).  Hoping to go to Ireland later in the year and talk to some of the relatives to see if anybody remembers anything like this.  Wish you well with your search - I think it's going to be very difficult!

--
Cambridgeshire, UK

Surnames: ROSENBERG, SKOWRONEK, CHENCINER, HERSZENKRUG from Warsaw


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Sarah L Meyer
 

There is a lot of help on Facebook.  There are at least three Jewish genealogy groups, Tracing the Tribe, Jewish genealogy portal and Jews from Poland , a group called DNA Your Jewish journey.  In addition there are general groups for people who do not know one or more birth parents, DNA Detectives and Search Angels - also DNA for genealogy, and a Group with a very long name - Ancestry 23&me FTDNA Gedmatch MyHeritage DNA Genealogy (in some order although Ancestry is first).   I would definitely start with a DNA detectives group in addition to downloading your Ancestry results and uploading the zipped files to FTDNA, MyHeritage and Gedmatch.  Be sure to read the terms of service.  To use the chromosome browser tools - which are important, there are small one time fees at FTDNA and MyHeritage ($19 and $29 respectively I think).  Good luck to you.


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Karen Lukeman
 

Welcome, Zora!! Bob gave you some great advice. I've done the 23andme and FTDNA DNA tests, and uploaded my data to Gedmatch and MyHeritage. My sister Nadine did the Ancestry DNA test. 

As an FYI, a good number of Jews did immigrate to Mexico, Central America and South America. I have two Mexican aunts who married two of my mother's brothers (all are Syrian Jews). And I also found, via 23andme, a third cousin whose ancestors immigrated from Syria to Dallas TX to Mexico. 

All the best and looking forward to what you find.

Karen Calmon Lukeman


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Zora Moore
 

Bob, I know nothing of my father at all.   I was born in December of 1968 in Saginaw, MI.   Unfortunately, my mother was very secretive about my bio-father.  She never told anyone, according to my grandmother who passed away.   The person listed as my father was the man she was married to at the time, my two older sisters' father.  I was able to talk to him prior to him passing, he did not know who the man my mom was seeing, but knew definitely he was not my father as he was living in NY during the time I was conceived.    So, when I saw I was surprised by these results, so were my sisters and distant cousins.   Ancestry did link me to a first cousin, and I am talk to him, to see if we can figure it out, he suggested I also do the 23 and Me, which I did and I am just waiting for the results.   

Image


Re: Who has access to the LDS library? (I need a microfilm)

Michaele Burris
 

I am in an LDS Family History Center weekly.  Give me the film number, the year, the type (BMD) and the names.  Fortunately I know just enough Polish to work witih the documents. 
Michaele Burris


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Elise Cundiff
 

It is quite possible that he was indeed from Mexico, as there has long been a Jewish community there.  I have known Jewish immigrants from Mexico  to the USA who were Spanish speaking.   


Re: Pre-nuptial contract, Trier #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Just a guess: could F stand for Florin? At one point, even the Dutch
Guilder was signified with an f.

Roger Lustig  Princeton, NJ USA Research coordinator, GerSIG

Yesterday, Jan. 2, 2020,Peter Lobbenberg <peterlob@peterlob.co.uk> wrote:
In 1809 an indirect ancestor of mine by marriage, Abraham LIEBMANN from
Bacharach, married Ma(g)dalene KAHN >from Trier, then Treves (E grave).
If I understand correctly, both Trier and Bacharach were under French
rule until the Congress of Vienna in 1815, which gave them to Prussia.
Abraham's and Magdalene's pre-marriage contract, drawn up in French and
evidently under Napoleonic law, is archived at:
https://tinyurl.com/wr2rdav (scroll down about 20 per cent).
It expresses financial amounts two ways, once in words and once
in numbers - but, intriguingly, the former are consistently 210
per cent of the latter.
For example (accents omitted for simplicity):
"... reconnait le dit sieur Abraham Liebmann avoir recu par sa future
epouse une dot de douze cent soixante Francs (600F) dont il declare
parfaitement etre content"
(... the said Mr Abraham LIEBMANN acknowledges receipt >from his future
spouse of a dowry of one thousand two hundred and sixty Francs (600F)
which which he declares that he is perfectly content)
and in the case of Abraham's death
"...ans la troisieme annee de son mariage ou apres, elle obtiendra
lasomme de dix huit cent quatre vingt dix francs (900F)"
(... in the third year of the marriage or later, she shall obtain the sum
of one thousand eight hundred and ninety francs (900F).
I have searched in vain for anything in the history of the French franc
that would explain this, and I'm mystified. Can any member suggest an answer?

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