Date   

Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Lisa
 

Dear Zora,
From your ethnicity breakdown it is apparent your birth father was Jewish. Since your mother was African American, it should be easy for you to sort out your maternal and paternal dna matches. You’ll need to determine your highest paternal match and from there your research will begin.
Might I suggest that before you reach out and contact any of your matches, that you join the Facebook group called DNA Detectives.
All Best,
Lisa Brahin Weinblatt


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Ina Getzoff
 

Alberto:
You are right in that genealogy is an individuals history but it is also the history of the family that they belong to-parents, grandparents, great grandparents, etc. Also, you are right in that the Jews have been everywhere for thousands of years.  DNA is now the "new kid on the block" so to speak and it is helping many of us to learn about our family history and in some cases the medical family history. 

I don't know if you have done any family research since you don't indicate if you have or where you are living and writing from but as a genealogist that has both been researching both my family and my husband's family for almost thirty years documenting migration using passenger records, census records, and family stories if they are available is just a few of the things that eventually tell someone who they are and where they came from.

If you have any further comments or want to carry on this conversation I would be more than glad to do so.

Ina Getzoff
Delray Beach, Fla.

On Fri, Jan 3, 2020 at 10:41 PM Alberto Guido Chester <agchester@...> wrote:
I am surprised by the several answers to this post, most of them trying to explain this individual story of a certain man and a certain woman having a certain, unique child, by using collective generalizations.

Genealogy, in my understanding, is the history of individuals. Sometimes those histories match general migration trends.

Most times they do not match anything, just a series of coincidences produced a journey, a destiny and a fate.

This is true specially for Jewish people,  who have been subject to diasporas ( greek for dispersion) and numerous migrations.

I suggest the primitive poster to search for her own history, insisting on family lore ( which she says there is not, but maybe its hidden in family secrets) or DNA searches. 

Since in the XX th C ( when the poster was born, most certainly), Jews have been everywhere, looking for migration trends will not help her. Look for your own story !

Hope this helps

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina



Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Bob Silverstein
 

Hi Dave, 

Thanks for your interesting post.  Being Jewish is just like everything else in life: complicated.  Names can mislead.  Family stories can mislead.  I know of mixed marriages where the non-Jewish partners, converted or not, have more respect for Judaism than some born Jewish.  We cannot all live in Israel or Crown Heights and insulate ourselves from the non-Jewish world so we make certain accommodations to our own realities.  Does that make us any less Jewish?

DNA.  The data are often pretty convincing.  Endogamy is when things get messy.  When you say you may be cousins of your sisters-in-law, coming up a third or more degree cousin probably means you can add a few more degrees to the relationship.  From a Halachic standpoint, you are probably safe.  Any way, they are sisters-in-law and not a wife.

In Zora's case, I would bet that the ethnicity estimate is right.  She came up 51% European Jewish.  That is possible when one parent is 100% the same.  Unless someone knows otherwise, not a lot of wiggle room there.  Let us all hope Zora finds the answers she is looking for.

I hope you stay safe from the fires.
Bob


Re: Searching for the grave of my uncle in Israel

Peninah Zilberman
 

Shalom,
You should contact HEVREH KADISHA AKKO, this is the Burial Society 
Or the local City Hall, and they will direct you.
Good Luck
Peninah

Fundatia Tarbut Sighet
+40 74 414 5351
www.ftsighet.com


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Alberto Guido Chester
 

I am surprised by the several answers to this post, most of them trying to explain this individual story of a certain man and a certain woman having a certain, unique child, by using collective generalizations.

Genealogy, in my understanding, is the history of individuals. Sometimes those histories match general migration trends.

Most times they do not match anything, just a series of coincidences produced a journey, a destiny and a fate.

This is true specially for Jewish people,  who have been subject to diasporas ( greek for dispersion) and numerous migrations.

I suggest the primitive poster to search for her own history, insisting on family lore ( which she says there is not, but maybe its hidden in family secrets) or DNA searches. 

Since in the XX th C ( when the poster was born, most certainly), Jews have been everywhere, looking for migration trends will not help her. Look for your own story !

Hope this helps

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina



Re: 2019 Ukraine Year-End Update #ukraine

Hilary Henkin
 

Hi David,
I noticed you asked about "Ekaterinburg (Gatrinslove (sp), or Yekaterinoslav)."  I do believe that Ekaterinburg is an entirely different place than Ekaterinoslav.

Also, just FYI, in 2015 or 2016, since you seem to be keeping track of this stuff, Dnep... changed its name to "Dnipro."  Apparently the Petrovsk of "Dnepropetrovsk" was some communist hotshot back in the day, and the city wanted to divest from that relationship completely.  It probably didn't hurt that Dnipro is a whole lot easier to say and spell.... :-)

Your signature block includes Berlins in Detroit - Any links to Henkin?  Were they, by any chance, from Belarus (Mogilev)?

Happy New Year!

Hilary Henkin


On 1/3/2020 4:13 PM, David Syner wrote:
Phyllis,
Wondering if you have any information on Ekaterinburg (Gatrinslove (sp), or Yekaterinoslav)
thanks
David

Researching
SINER / ZINNER / ZINER New YorkBialystok

SCHMALTZ / SCHMALZ/SZMALZ New York, Luna, Grodno, Stoll, Rudman, Carbella ;Russia ( Grodno is now Hrodna, Belarus ) SCHULTZ TENN, AVES, Russia  POUSNER / POSNER, New York,Russia BERLIN Detroit BELENKY / BIELINKA / BELLINSKY Libau, Latvia , Mohilew  NEWMAN Detroit NEIMAN / NUONAW/ PENICA / PENITZ Krasosielc, Poland, Warshaw  MELTZERDetroit, Katrinslove or Poltavia or Gatrinslove (sp), Russia, or Yekahnislaw or Ekaterinoslau (Ekaterinoslav is now Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine) DEITCH, Russia   RACHATAN/RACHIDSON /RUSICHAU / RUSICHAN / KrasechanDwinsk,Russia( Dwinsk is Daugavpils, Latvia) BELIAK/ BIELAK / BELAK Toronta, CanadaBreslaw, Slobotka,  Riga, Dwinsk


Re: 2019 Ukraine Year-End Update #ukraine

Peter Lebensold
 

Thanks, David, for making it so easy for the rest of us to scan your family's names.  I hope more posters will make that a habit -- it saves a great deal of time.

Peter
Toronto


Name change

Calvin Ennis
 

My grandfather changed his name officially In Brooklyn about 1925 Where can I get proof for this
Thanks
Cal Ennis


Re: הנושא: [JewishGen.org] Who has access to the LDS library? (I need a microfilm)

Hilary Henkin
 

Actually, I still use the film numbers a lot.

If you know the film number, you can search, and the listed results will
tell you which film (and which section) you need, AND have the link
directly to the images.  (If the images are not restricted). In some
cases, I've been able to navigate to the images, when search results
told me they were restricted.

Hilary


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
There are no more films (unless they are on hold from before). Now
everything is being digitized and available online on LDS libraries or
to LDS members. The film numbers are no good anymore.


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Dave Lichtenstein
 

Hello Bob.  I am not going to use a meaningless "like" with your post but rather comment on it.  You are right in that we Jews are endogamous.  Both my sisters did the right thing and married fellow Jews (sadly one of them later became divorced.)  I have taken a couple of major DNA tests and I must admit that I am sometimes a bit sceptical of the results.  In fact I am quite flattered by many of the results apparently being linked to many people with Anglo-Celtic names.  Having lived all my life in predominantly Anglo-Celtic communities, I have always felt the odd "man" out with my own surname which I have never changed.  However, to get back to the endogamous factor, I now find that I am supposed to be related through my DNA to many of my sisters-in-laws.

With best wishes
Dave Lichtenstein
Sydney, Australia


Re: 2019 Ukraine Year-End Update #ukraine

David Syner
 

Phyllis,
Wondering if you have any information on Ekaterinburg (Gatrinslove (sp), or Yekaterinoslav)
thanks
David

Researching
SINER / ZINNER / ZINER New YorkBialystok

SCHMALTZ / SCHMALZ/SZMALZ New York, Luna, Grodno, Stoll, Rudman, Carbella ;Russia ( Grodno is now Hrodna, Belarus ) SCHULTZ TENN, AVES, Russia  POUSNER / POSNER, New York,Russia BERLIN Detroit BELENKY / BIELINKA / BELLINSKY Libau, Latvia , Mohilew  NEWMAN Detroit NEIMAN / NUONAW/ PENICA / PENITZ Krasosielc, Poland, Warshaw  MELTZERDetroit, Katrinslove or Poltavia or Gatrinslove (sp), Russia, or Yekahnislaw or Ekaterinoslau (Ekaterinoslav is now Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine) DEITCH, Russia   RACHATAN/RACHIDSON /RUSICHAU / RUSICHAN / KrasechanDwinsk,Russia( Dwinsk is Daugavpils, Latvia) BELIAK/ BIELAK / BELAK Toronta, CanadaBreslaw, Slobotka,  Riga, Dwinsk


Re: JRI Poland #Poland Major new Ostrowiec Swientokrzyski records extraction project launched Minia or Me he #poland

janllb@...
 

I realize this was a couple of years ago. Where are things at presently or is the extraction and posting done? Hoping to find some trace of my family surname likely a variation on Dawidsohn or possibly Dawidowic. But one remotely resembling that surname shows in Ostrowiec presently and Yet I have a number of confirmed Ostrowiec Davidson relatives. 
Here’s what I know anecdotally or from North American records. My GGG Grandfather was Oszer Zelik surname?? b. Ostrowiec c 1829 and his wife my GGG Grandmother Raizel / Machla Rayzla Davidson (born Dawidsohn ??) b.c,1825 d. BW 1861 and 1864 in Ostrowiec. Machla Rayzla’s parents were possibly Hana (born Szlamowicz). B.c 1792 likely Ostrowiec, and d. 1831 in Gniewoszow, Radom and Mosiek (no details on him and some believe OZ took Machla Rayzla’s surname on marriage,  so he may have had a different surname originally. 
OZ’s parents were POSSIBLY father named Minia or Menye, mother  Ruchla.  No other info or surnames there. 

OZ and Machla Rayzla had at least 3 children,
1) my GG GRANDFATHER Chaim Baresh b.c 1850 and died 1910 both Ostrowiec married in Ostrowiec c.1876  to my GG Grandmother Necha Sosia / Nechie Sosza "Nacha Shosha or Nechie/Nellie Sadie" Davidson (born Katz/Kac In May 1857, in Ostrowiec, Poland who died May 14 1923, Toronto Canada.
2) daughter Sura Chaja, later married Froim Ajzenberg later Izenberg, likely in Ostrowiec
3) Sholem later Samuel b. Oct 1861 inOstrowiec who married Sarah about 1888 in Ostrowiec.

All came over to Canada already separately declaring themselves as DAVIDSONs already per ship records, but I can find no trace of any of them in Ostrowiec even by first name combinations or with spouses. 
They are the only branch of my family with no Polish records at all, only anecdotal info. 
It's very frustrating as I’ve been searching for many years, and am a fairly experienced amateur genealogist...
Can you help? 
Janyce Lastman janllb@...


Re: POHORYLES, NIEDERMAYER, et al.

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

Thank you, Valentin,

I’d be most appreciative of seeing the Brillants’ graves and the Niedermayer’s papers.  

My email address is:  bsmannlein@....

Isn’t Sde Yehosua a military cemetery?  How can civilians be buried there?

Best wishes from Tucson, Arizona,

Barbara



On Jan 3, 2020, at 10:20 AM, Valentin Lupu <lupuval@...> wrote:

Hi Barbara,
I located the graves of: Rachel and Yakob Osias Niedermayer as well as Ruth and Maximilian Brillant's (the name Brillant is the correct one as spelled in the graves and in the Niedermayers citizenship documents).
I didn't find yet Mor's grave.
Here is the information you're interested on:
Rachel Niedermayer: born to Tzvi Pohoryles in Husyatin, Poland, August 4, 1887, Passed away on April 11, 1976. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Yakob Ozias (Yehoshua) Niedermayer: born to Chaim Naftali in Kotzmann, Austria, February 2, 1884. Passed away on March 7, 1968.  Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Ruth Brillant: born to Rachel and Yakov in 1919. Passed away on July 3, 2002. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
Maximilian Brillant: born to Leah and Victor in 1907. Passed away on September 15, 2005. Buried in Sdeh Yehoshua Cemetery, Haifa.
I can send photos of the graves as well as the Niedermayer's citizenship documents (Palestine, 1947) if you let me know your email address.
Valentin Lupu
Israel
_._,_._,_


Re: POHORYLES, NIEDERMAYER, et al.

Jane Neff Rollins
 

Hello Barbara,

My Aunt Joan Share's maiden name was Pohoryles, and her people were from Husiatyn. She lives in the Philadelphia area. Are you related to her?

Jane

Jane Neff Rollins
Montrose CA USA
Locations -- Surnames
Tiraspol -- Kishinevsky, Zeilikovich, Sirota
Slonim/Volkovysk/Svisloch -- Klebansky, Vatnik 
Berdichev -- Chernorudsky
Zhitomir -- Pekler, Gumenik, Gorlovsky, Garber


Re: הנושא: [JewishGen.org] Who has access to the LDS library? (I need a microfilm)

Barbara S. Weitz
 

Israel doesn’t have an LDS Family Center.  The closest one is in Cyprus.  There’s one here in Asheville, NC.  Tell me what you need and I’ll try to go there and find it.

 

Prof. Barbara Weitz

Retired, Florida International University

Director of Film Studies

Director of Czech Studies Pgm

http://10hvezd.cz/en/

Current residence: 

123 Thurland Av

Asheville, NC 28803

 

 


Re: USCIS questions

Renée K. Carl
 

Robert

It is not known when the proposed fees would be put in place, if at all. The immediate next step is for USCIS to review all the comments, weigh the evidence, and make decisions. The group of us at Records Not Revenue is keeping an eye on things, as is RPAC and others.

The USCIS Genealogy Program maintains information on this website: https://www.uscis.gov/genealogy. I suggest reviewing things there. As Mark said, it's not about when they arrived, though that can be a factor, it is more about when and if they naturalized. There are many, many "it depends..." but here are some basics to keep in mind:

If they were alive and NOT naturalized in 1940, when registration of Aliens began, they would have an Alien Registration Form
If they naturalized after 1944, they would have an A-file. Note that many A-files are in the process of going from USCIS to NARA-Kansas City or San Bruno, or are already there.
If they naturalized, they would have a C-file, but depending on when, the C-file won't contain more than the 3 forms of the Naturalization process available at various NARA locations.
Arrival after 1924? Visa files
Issues finding landing papers? Registry file.

There are other unique cases, such as you need to make an index search request if you think there might be an extant Board of Special Inquiry case file related to deportation hearings. Or, as in the case of my grandfather, he arrived as a child, naturalized under his father, as was the law at the time. However, when my grandfather was in his late 60s, he wrote to what was then INS to request a copy of his naturalization certificate, and to ask if his father's file gave information on proof of my grandfather's birth, as he needed to prove to Social Security his age in order to get his benefits. This created a whole slew of forms and papers that gave me details about my grandfather no one had before seen, such as a letter from the school board stating his age in first grade and the name of the school.

Every request made to USCIS is for an individual, so 4 grandparents and 2 greats = 6 requests. An index search is $65 and the copy of the resulting findings is also $65, though again, there are several "it depends" situations.

I hope this helps
Renee Carl
Washington DC

CARL/CARROLL/KAROL Volhynia, Boston, St Louis
LERNER Sudylkiv, Boston, St. Louis
KATSCHER/KATHER/KETCHER Vidzy, Daugavpils, NYC, St. Louis
POLINSKY/POLUNSKY Ariogala, St. Louis


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Ina Getzoff
 

Is there anyone in your family that is still alive and might be able to help you begin looking back?  Do you have any pictures or paperwork regarding your parents that might be of help? Lately, many stories have been coming out after DNA testing that the parents that "we" thought were our biological parents actually are not. You don't indicate how old you are or where you grew up or with whom since you were very young when your mother passed away or if you actually knew your father. Those are questions that need to be answered and might be answered by the family that you lived with. 
Please post more information so our group can try and help you.
Ina Getzoff
JGSPBCI Secretary
Delray Beach, Fla.


Searching for the grave of my uncle in Israel

Pavel Ravitsky
 

I’m searching for the grave of my uncle Meer ben Pinchas Rozentsvaig in Israel. He immigrated from Kishinev to Israel in 1975. His address in Israel was St. Hertzel 45/13, Akko. He probably past away in 1999. Who know what database should I search?


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

jbonline1111@...
 

My step-grandmother had many family members who had emigrated from Russia to Mexico when they were not allowed to enter the United States.  Elise may well be correct.


Re: הנושא: [JewishGen.org] Who has access to the LDS library? (I need a microfilm)

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybruc@...>
 

There are no more films (unless they are on hold from before). Now everything is being digitized and available online on LDS libraries or to LDS members. The film numbers are no good anymore.

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