Date   

Re: Illegal Transport Passenger Lists

Lewis, Megan
 

Dear Leah,

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has some material about illegal immigration to Palestine in our archives collection.  You can search our Collections Search catalog, https://collections.ushmm.org.  I would also check the Central Zionist Archives which also has material on immigrations during this time period.
 
We have records about the Kladovo transport from archives in Croatia and Serbia.  I did not check to see if these collections have the passenger list.

Information about conducting research at the Museum is at https://www.ushmm.org/collections/plan-a-research-visit. We are unable to conduct in-depth research for patrons.

Sincerely,

Megan Lewis


Megan Lewis  Reference Librarian  202.314.7860
National Institute for Holocaust Documentation
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
www.ushmm.org

NEVER AGAIN: WHAT YOU DO MATTERS

Support the Campaign for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


Re: Visiting Poland #poland

pacmgr@...
 

Google.  Tad Taube, he is a bay area philanthropist very involved with Poland.  He is one of the major funders of the Jewish Museum in Warsaw and is an honorary consul of Poland.  He also has a travel agency in Warsaw.

Lots to see, including the remmnants of the gGhetto in Warsaw and from Krakow a visit to Auschwitz.  Krakow is a beautiful and charming city with a Jewish quarter and important cemetary.

Jon


ViewMate Translation Request - Yiddish

Sue Okun
 

I've posted a page from a program from a Kosheveta (or Koshowater) Benevolent Society and Relief Fund Ball and Dance, New York, 1948.

It is on ViewMate at the following address: http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76507

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you so much for your help! 

Sue Okun


Re: ViewMate translation request - Russian (not Polish)

Dave Orens
 

Update: I've been informed the document I posted yesterday is written in Russian (script), not Polish.  My public thanks to the volunteer who has already assisted.

Regards,
David

------

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76564
Jewish Genealogy site for helping in the translation and identification of genealogy related documents, photos and artifacts
www.jewishgen.org

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

David Orens


ViewMate translation request-Russian post card

Amoz Chernoff
 

Because of the request to post to a new address, I repeat the following:

I've posted a postcard in Russian for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76464
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Amoz Chernoff


Translation of gravestones in Mikhaliski, Belarus

Ellie Roden
 

Thanks to a kind Genner, I have the translation in English of a list
of 98 gravestone inscriptions from Mikhaliski, Belarus. These
gravestones were recovered and restored sometime In the early 1990’s.

I will gladly share this list with anyone who is interested.

Ellie Roden
Wilmington, Vermont
USA


Searching for a Cohen family #southafrica

Marcus Shapiro
 

I am looking to make contact with descendants of Bennie Cohen of
Johannesburg and his wife Doreen nee Silverman. Bennie passed in 1943 aged
54. I believe they had 3 children: Naomi (b 1930), Ruth (b 1933) and
Leonard /Leon (b 1936). Ruth may have been a school teacher and may have
married a Doctor based in Pretoria.

This family (Bennie) were related to a Samuel Myers and wife Dora nee
Morrison who ran the Bethlehem Hotel (Samuel's mother being a Cohen).

Marcus Shapiro


Re: Wissotzky tea company Moscow #southafrica

Louise Goldschmidt <alfredlouise@...>
 

Dear forum,

Seeing this letter >from Geraldine reminds me I heard that a Cohen cousin who
married a Sager went to live in Kimberley. She was related probably sister of
Amelia Gelberg born Cohen. Is there any record of her going >from London.
Love to everyone
Louise Goldschmidt

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Wissotzky tea company Moscow
From: <geraldine.auerbach@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 17:29:59 -0000

Dear Forum
Thank you to all those who replied on the 'smous' question.
I have another question re the Wissotzky tea company of Moscow.

In subsequent correspondence re the smous question, it seems that in the early
1900s before the Russian Revolution, money could be sent >from South Africa to
family in the Russian Empire, via the Jewish owned and very powerful and extensive
Wissotzky tea company of Moscow.

Does anyone have any other examples of money transfer via this company? Did they
have a bank? Was this unique or was it well known to transmit money in this way
I wonder? How exactly was money transferred >from South Africa to family at home
in Latvia, Lithuania and in Russia itself?

I look forward to hearing >from you.

Best wishes
Geraldine

Geraldine Auerbach MBE
T: 020 8907 1905 M: 07971 818 262
geraldine.auerbach@gmail.com


Re: Visiting Poland #poland

Carole Shaw
 

Check out Leora Tec on Bridge to Poland on web.  She may see this anyway and reply to you directly as she’s active in Jewish genealogy.  I went on her tour of Jewish Poland last May.  Unmissable and unforgettable.

 

Carole Shaw, London UK

SCHNEIDER: Kamanets Podolsk, Ukraine & Libau/Libava/Liepaja, Latvia

KLUGMAN, GOLDSCHMID (plus variations), BRAUER: Libava/Libau/Liepaja, Latvia, Johannesburg

ROSENTHAL, ZUSCHNEIDER: Lublin, Poland

GREENBERG, BRZOZA/BJOZHA, SOBERSKI: Lomza/Nowogrod, Poland

SAMSON, BLIK: Amsterdam, Zandvoort, Holland


Issue #140 of Genealo-J has just been published #sephardic

Georges Graner
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 140, December 2019 has just been published

Anne-Marie Fribourg noted that a large number of Jews left Lorraine
around 1850 and especially >from the city of Hellimer to go to Brazil.
Most of them were jewelers. Some settled in Brazil but most of them went
back to France later. They founded prosperous companies with a branch in
Brazil and another one in France. Among the families quoted by the
authors, one finds those of Mayer Cain dit Lambert, of Alexandre Abraham
Gerson, of Gerson Gerson, of Louis Ongre, of Simon Levy, of Edouard
Daniel, and of Samuel Lion. Detailed family trees are given for each of
these families.

Paul Misraki (1908-1998) was a very famous French composer just before
and just after World War II. Several of the songs he composed for the
band of Ray Ventura are still very popular in France nowadays. Genevieve
Haroche-Bouzinac tells us Misraki's life. Paul Misrachi (the original
spelling of his name) belongs to a wealthy family of Salonika but his
parents moved to Constantinople before his birth. In 1910, his father
was promoted to a position in Bucarest (Romania) where the whole family
settled. When Romania entered the war, life in Bucarest became dangerous
and they left the city in 1916. They made a very long travel by train
through Romania, Russia (Saint-Petersburg), Finland, Sweden, followed by
a boat trip to England and to Marseilles. Paul studies in Marseilles but
is much more interested by music than by the insurance company suggested
by his father. He begins to compose songs and in 1929 joins the band of
Ray Ventura, first as the pianist and later as the official composer of
the band. The band is more and more popular and makes many tours all
over Europe and North Africa. In May 1941, the German authorities banned
Ray Ventura and Paul Misraki, although Paul converted to catholicism in
1938. Ray Ventura was lucky enough to obtain visas for Brazil for his
whole group. Later, in 1945, Paul is retained by Hollywood where he
works with Marlene Dietrich, Jean-Pierre Aumont, and Maria Montez. He
then comes back to France where his whole family has been killed by the
Nazis. Ray Ventura's band is dissolved in 1947. Thereafter, Paul becomes
essentially a movie film composer for many famous producers.

L'Alliance Israelite Universelle (AIU) was founded in 1860 to teach in
the French language the Jews of several countries in the Ottoman Empire,
Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and Morocco. AIU has today an huge amount of
archives. A group of members of our Society has begun to analyze these
archives in order to help AIU and also to extract interesting
genealogical pieces of information. Philippe Danan presents what is done
concerning Morocco where AIU was implemented as early as 1862. In 1914,
28 schools were present in 13 cities of this country which concerned
more than 3000 boys and 2000 girls. .The available documents are
extremely heterogeneous: letters of directors or professors of schools
addressed to the parisian office of AIU, lists of pupils and
apprentices,notables, people financially helped, members of AIU, adults
attending evening lessons as well as descriptions of rites or
traditions. Our group insists on collecting all names, whatever their
origin. The task is huge and will take several years.

Georges Graner


Ashkenazi DNA percentage question #dna

richard may
 

Dear community,

I have 1 known Ashkenazi great grandparent of 8. One eight is 12.5%.
According to 23andMe, FTDNA, AncestryDNA and MyHeritage DNA
my DNA is about 20% Ashkenazi. All agree on this. This is 1.6 times
more Ashkenazi DNA than I can account for genealogically.

Is it more likely that I have an undiscovered ancestor with Ashkenazi DNA,
who perhaps assimilated, or that I simply inherited more than half of my
grandparent's Ashkenazi DNA? Thank you for your kind erudite help!

Richard May ferdlilac@yahoo.com
North Carolina, U.S.A.


Illegal Transport Passenger Lists

Sniderlh
 

I am new to this discussion group, but thought I would jump right in with questions concerning family who fled Vienna, Austria following the Anschluss in 1938.  In particular I am interested in gathering more information regarding a cousin of my father's, and his wife.

In Dec.1938, this cousin left for Palestine. I heard he sailed on board the CHEPO, which  I found left from Tulcea, Romania and arrived undetected at Netanya.  My questions would be:  1) Does a passenger transport list exist somewhere (Israel, Romania, Austria) for those who sailed on this voyage?  2) How did he likely travel from Vienna to Tulcea?  (train, boat)  I do know he made it safely, and lived the rest of his life in Palestine/now Israel.

His wife is a trickier situation. I have a document from the Joint Distribution Committee telling of her death in Oct,1941; it said she was killed by the Germans in Zasavitza near Sabac in October. The document is dated 1945.  From my research, I am guessing she was among the unfortunates in the Kladovo Transport group, but would like to substantiate that thought.  If so, my questions here would be:  1) Does a list of those in the group, exist, and if so, where & can I see an actual copy of it?  2)  If she sailed on the URANUS, is there an existing passenger list for that voyage, somewhere?  3) If she was in the Kladovo Group, I read it started out in Nov 1939.  Was there any documented contact with the group over those years the tragedy played out in the various locations?  

I would appreciate any help from those with more knowledge, and/or those who have family members they researched in similar circumstances.  Right now I feel I am coming across conflicting details, and would like to clarify whatever I can.

Thank you,

Leah


ViewMate translation request - Polish

Dave Orens
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM76564
Jewish Genealogy site for helping in the translation and identification of genealogy related documents, photos and artifacts
www.jewishgen.org

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

David Orens


Re: Help finding ancestor's grave in Israel - died around 1900

Chicago Bubby
 

I realized that I should add his name:  Yehuda Leib Perlman (Perelman/Pearlman)


Re: Surprising DNA results from Ancestry

Eva Lawrence
 


Alberto
People live in communities and are influenced by them. Most of my genealogical discoveries have been made by looking at patterns of behaviour, or by investigating why a norm has not been followed.   Even stereotypes are only conclusions reached from experience, and the wider your experience, the more useful they become.. 
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Help finding ancestor's grave in Israel - died around 1900

Chicago Bubby
 

For many years we have been searching for the grave of my husband's 3rd great-grandfather who supposedly died in Palestine around 1900. Family history has it that he had lived in Kapyl (also known as Kapulya in Minsk Province), and around 1888 at an old age had gone to live in Jerusalem to die there. He supposedly died there around 1900. We have contacted all of the Jerusalem area Chevra Kadishas as well as the HaDarom cemetery in the Tel Aviv vicinity and have used all online tools and search engines and have not found anything.

Does anyone have any further idea as to how to how to find his burial place?


Issue #140 of Genealo-J has just been published #france

Georges Graner
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 140, December 2019 has just been published

Anne-Marie Fribourg noted that a large number of Jews left Lorraine
around 1850 and especially >from the city of Hellimer to go to Brazil.
Most of them were jewelers. Some settled in Brazil but most of them went
back to France later. They founded prosperous companies with a branch in
Brazil and another one in France. Among the families quoted by the
authors, one finds those of Mayer Cain dit Lambert, of Alexandre Abraham
Gerson, of Gerson Gerson, of Louis Ongre, of Simon Levy, of Edouard
Daniel, and of Samuel Lion. Detailed family trees are given for each of
these families.

Paul Misraki (1908-1998) was a very famous French composer just before
and just after World War II. Several of the songs he composed for the
band of Ray Ventura are still very popular in France nowadays. Geneviève
Haroche-Bouzinac tells us Misraki’s life. Paul Misrachi (the original
spelling of his name) belongs to a wealthy family of Salonika but his
parents moved to Constantinople before his birth. In 1910, his father
was promoted to a position in Bucarest (Romania) where the whole family
settled. When Romania entered the war, life in Bucarest became dangerous
and they left the city in 1916. They made a very long travel by train
through Romania, Russia (Saint-Petersburg), Finland, Sweden, followed by
a boat trip to England and to Marseilles. Paul studies in Marseilles but
is much more interested by music than by the insurance company suggested
by his father. He begins to compose songs and in 1929 joins the band of
Ray Ventura, first as the pianist and later as the official composer of
the band. The band is more and more popular and makes many tours all
over Europe and North Africa. In May 1941, the German authorities banned
Ray Ventura and Paul Misraki, although Paul converted to catholicism in
1938. Ray Ventura was lucky enough to obtain visas for Brazil for his
whole group. Later, in 1945, Paul is retained by Hollywood where he
works with Marlene Dietrich, Jean-Pierre Aumont, and Maria Montez. He
then comes back to France where his whole family has been killed by the
Nazis. Ray Ventura's band is dissolved in 1947. Thereafter, Paul becomes
essentially a movie film composer for many famous producers.

L'Alliance Israelite Universelle (AIU) was founded in 1860 to teach in
the French language the Jews of several countries in the Ottoman Empire,
Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and Morocco. AIU has today an huge amount of
archives. A group of members of our Society has begun to analyze these
archives in order to help AIU and also to extract interesting
genealogical pieces of information. Philippe Danan presents what is done
concerning Morocco where AIU was implemented as early as 1862. In 1914,
28 schools were present in 13 cities of this country which concerned
more than 3000 boys and 2000 girls. .The available documents are
extremely heterogeneous: letters of directors or professors of schools
addressed to the Parisian office of AIU, lists of pupils and
apprentices,notables, people financially helped, members of AIU, adults
attending evening lessons as well as descriptions of rites or
traditions. Our group insists on collecting all names, whatever their
origin. The task is huge and will take several years.


Sending messages to the SIG List .... #france

Rosanne Leeson
 

Dear fellow FrenchSIG members,

It is time for a reminder on how to properly respond to messages sent
from the FrenchSIG (or any other SIG)
if you receive your mail via the mail DIGEST.

1 - Please do NOT hit your Reply key!  This drags the entire Digest
along with it, and is impossible for the Moderators to send out.

2 - Please start a new message with your reply, etc.  You may reference
briefly  the item to which you are responding.

Thank you for your attention to this procedure, which will make your 
answers more effective.

Rosanne Leeson
Co-Coordinator
FrenchSIG


Issue #140 of Genealo-J has just been published #germany

Georges Graner
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 140, December 2019 has just been published

Anne-Marie Fribourg noted that a large number of Jews left Lorraine
around 1850 and especially >from the city of Hellimer to go to Brazil.
Most of them were jewelers. Some settled in Brazil but most of them went
back to France later. They founded prosperous companies with a branch in
Brazil and another one in France. Among the families quoted by the
authors, one finds those of Mayer Cain dit Lambert, of Alexandre Abraham
Gerson, of Gerson Gerson, of Louis Ongre, of Simon Levy, of Edouard
Daniel, and of Samuel Lion. Detailed family trees are given for each of
these families.

Paul Misraki (1908-1998) was a very famous French composer just before
and just after World War II. Several of the songs he composed for the
band of Ray Ventura are still very popular in France nowadays. Genevive
Haroche-Bouzinac tells us Misrakiâ's life. Paul Misrachi (the original
spelling of his name) belongs to a wealthy family of Salonika but his
parents moved to Constantinople before his birth. In 1910, his father
was promoted to a position in Bucarest (Romania) where the whole family
settled. When Romania entered the war, life in Bucarest became dangerous
and they left the city in 1916. They made a very long travel by train
through Romania, Russia (Saint-Petersburg), Finland, Sweden, followed by
a boat trip to England and to Marseilles. Paul studies in Marseilles but
is much more interested by music than by the insurance company suggested
by his father. He begins to compose songs and in 1929 joins the band of
Ray Ventura, first as the pianist and later as the official composer of
the band. The band is more and more popular and makes many tours all
over Europe and North Africa. In May 1941, the German authorities banned
Ray Ventura and Paul Misraki, although Paul converted to catholicism in
1938. Ray Ventura was lucky enough to obtain visas for Brazil for his
whole group. Later, in 1945, Paul is retained by Hollywood where he
works with Marlene Dietrich, Jean-Pierre Aumont, and Maria Montez. He
then comes back to France where his whole family has been killed by the
Nazis. Ray Ventura’s band is dissolved in 1947. Thereafter, Paul becomes
essentially a movie film composer for many famous producers.

L’Alliance Israelite Universelle (AIU) was founded in 1860 to teach in
the French language the Jews of several countries in the Ottoman Empire,
Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and Morocco. AIU has today an huge amount of
archives. A group of members of our Society has begun to analyze these
archives in order to help AIU and also to extract interesting
genealogical pieces of information. Philippe Danan presents what is done
concerning Morocco where AIU was implemented as early as 1862. In 1914,
28 schools were present in 13 cities of this country which concerned
more than 3000 boys and 2000 girls. .The available documents are
extremely heterogeneous : letters of directors or professors of schools
addressed to the parisian office of AIU, lists of pupils and
apprentices,notables, people financially helped, members of AIU, adults
attending evening lessons as well as descriptions of rites or
traditions. Our group insists on collecting all names, whatever their
origin. The task is huge and will take several years.

Georges Graner in France georges.graner@wanadoo.fr


Re: Prenuptial agrreement #germany

Eva Lawrence
 

Abraham Liebmann's prenuptial agreement >from Trier expresses amounts in
two ways, where the first amount is 210% of the second. I've looked at
the original manuscript, and I think that the second, smaller amount is
in French francs, and the first denomination is francs el (e has an
acute accent) standing for ecu locale, i.e.. local-exchange francs,
which would be worth less.

Eva Lawrence, St Albans, UK eva.lawrence@idnet.com

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