Date   

Ashkenazi DNA percentage question #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

I have 1 known Ashkenazi great grandparent of 8. One eight is 12.5%.
According to 23andMe, FTDNA, AncestryDNA and MyHeritage DNA
my DNA is about 20% Ashkenazi. All agree on this. This is 1.6 times
more Ashkenazi DNA than I can account for genealogically. Is it more
likely that I have an undiscovered ancestor with Ashkenazi DNA, who
perhaps assimilated, or that I simply inherited more than half of my
grandparent's Ashkenazi DNA?
It is more likely that you inherited more than your proportionate
share of your ggp's dna.
We each receive half our dna >from each parent, but it is a random
half. Assume that your ggp had only 8 genes, A-H. Assume further
that your gp inherited 4 of them, genes A-D, 50%. Your parent would
have inherited 4 genes >from your gp. They might have been A-D, in
which case your parent would have 50% Ashkenazi genes. If your parent
inherited genes E-H, he would have no Ashkenazi genes. Either result
is possible, though neither is the most statistically likely. It is
more likely that your parent inherited 3, 2, or 1 Ashkenazi genes.
The same calculus applies to your inheritance >from your parent, which
is why it appears that you have more Ashkenazi dna than you "should"
have.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA 92110 U.S.A.


Re: Ashkenazic percentage question #dna

Sarah L Meyer
 

Dear Mr. May,
The 1/8th is an average - or the mean of the distribution. Only from
your parents is it exactly 50-50. But >from your grandparents or great
grandparents the percentages vary. For example you could have received from
your mother you could have received 45% of her 50% >from her mother and 55%
of her 50% >from her father. >from your father you could have received 75% of
his 50% >from his father and 25% of his 50% >from his mother. You might look
at the ISOGG wiki (https://isogg.org/wiki/Wiki_Welcome_Page) for more
information. Most of their charts talk in percentage and cM charts of how
much DNA you share with your matches, but this is discussed as well. Also
there are several Facebook groups which deal with this sort of question.
Sarah

^^^
Dear community,

I have 1 known Ashkenazi great grandparent of 8. One eight is 12.5%.
According to 23andMe, FTDNA, AncestryDNA and MyHeritage DNA my DNA is about
20% Ashkenazi. All agree on this. This is 1.6 times more Ashkenazi DNA than
I can account for genealogically.

Is it more likely that I have an undiscovered ancestor with Ashkenazi DNA,
who perhaps assimilated, or that I simply inherited more than half of my
grandparent's Ashkenazi DNA? Thank you for your kind erudite help!

Richard May ferdlilac@yahoo.com


Re: Issue#140 of Genealo-J--Alliance Israelite Universelle #germany

Stepak
 

IGRA (Israel Genealogy Research Association) has
received permission and is undertaking a project with permission of the
offices of Alliance (AIU) in Paris to prepare lists of students >from the
schools in Morocco and then other countries >from North Africa, which are in
Israeli archives. These lists are important to IGRA because of the
immigration of many members of the Jewish communities in those countries to
Israel.

Ellen Stepak, Tel Aviv, Israel estepak@zahav.net.il


Seeking WW I military records #germany

Richard Oppenheimer <r.d.oppenheimer@...>
 

Hello Ger Sig members,

Is there a website available which lists German Jews who served in WW I,
with dates and places of service?

I am seeking dates and places of service for two relatives of whom I have
photo's in WWI uniforms in Germany.

Isaak MANNHEIMER (my grandfather) born in Bad Wildungen 1885, and Salomon
LILIENSTEIN (my great uncle), born in Gossfelden 1884.

Best regards, Richard D.Oppenheimer, r.d.oppenheimer@gmail.com


Sol Krongelb z"l #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

I am sad to let you know that Sol Krongelb passed away on November 11,
2019 in Westchester County, NY.

Sol was a LitvakSIG member since 1999 and a Kaunas and Raseiniai
Districts supporter for almost as long. He was also a presence at
many annual conferences where he was a volunteer translator of
documents written in Yiddish.

Sol was truly a mensch who helped my with translations on several
occasions.

We extend our belated sympathies to Sol's family.

Eden Joachim
Treasurer,
LitvakSIG


Re: Repatriation 1945-7: Russia to Poland

boris
 

Judy,

Thank you for an excellent account. My mother also traveled back from Uzbekistan (to Ukraine) in a cattle car, but did not provide such vivid details. To be sure, there was a shortage of normal passenger cars in the Soviet Union at the end of the war, so they were reserved for the “more equal pigs”, i.e. Communist party members, bosses of the industry, and cultural elite.

As to fleeing from Europe, there were several Jewish organizations helping survivors, like HIAS. There was at least one, very secretive, organization called BRIHA, who smuggled Jews into Mandate Palestine. Anybody, whose family went that route, or who is interested in the subject, should seek an excellent book by Ephraim Dekel, titled B’RIHA: Flight to the Homeland. It was published in Hebrew, and then in English, ca. 1973. The book gives a country by country account of the BRIHA’s activities.

Boris Feldblyum
boris@...


Re: Repatriation 1945-7: Russia to Poland

jbonline1111@...
 

Thank you for sharing your husband's story.  Imagining the very daunting, to say the least, conditions under which your husband, his family and others with them managed to live and survive, I can't help but think they were very strong people.  As far as I know, none of my own European family survived the concentration camps.  


Re: Photo request- Los Angeles, CA

Sarah L Meyer
 

I have requested many photos through Find A Grave and a lot depends on which volunteer picks up the request.  Try it there first and if you don't get a response in say a month, then repost here.   I have gotten some really good photos and other times the gravestones are too old or worn to be of help (mostly this has been my husband's family).  But I have also requested some for my family as well.


Re: Szymon SOLDINGER and Ena GRUBNER

Michael Hoffman
 

Hi Shaul Berger,

Do a search on the following specific websites for England, UK
www.freebmd.org.uk www.findmypast.co.uk and for ordering Birth, Marriage and Death Certificates
from the website of the General Register Office at www.gro.gov.uk 
Note that the Findmypast website is a payed for website.

The following are the references for ordering the Death Certificates for:-
Szymon Soldinger
Death 1963
District: Kensington
Ref: Vol 5c page 1020

Ena Soldinger
Death 1991
District: Fulham
Ref: Vol 12 Page 774

Best regards,

Michael Hoffman

Borehamwood,
HERTS UK 


Jews of Cairo #sephardic

peter stein <peterstein777@...>
 

Hi List Manager,

I am recommended by a friend to your recent article "Jews of Cairo",
on account of a mutual friend here in Australia. She is indeed of
that background but lacking much background information.

A link would be appreciated.

B'Shalom
Peter Stein
Sydney


Spanish and Portuguese research #sephardic

Harvey Goldberg <harveygoldberg93@...>
 

Dear friends,

My interest is Dutch Sephardic community >from early settlement in
Amsterdam both >from Hamburg and the Iberian Peninsular and immigration
to London USA ...Caribbean and now living in Israel.

My grandmother was an Oheb Brandon...family names such as Isaac de
Cordova, Braco De Orion the De Ancona,and many if not all the old
Dutch Sephardim are related.

Can you help me with further research,I would be most grateful.
My name is Harvey Goldberg
I live in London .

Kind regards

Harvey


Re: Repatriation 1945-7: Russia to Poland

Rosalind
 

Thank you.it gives a different perspective to our lives today.
We well. Thank you.
Ros Romem


Re: Illegal Transport Passenger Lists

Helen Krag
 

There was a book about the Kladovo Transport published in Vienna, as
well as an exhibition at Jewish Museum in Vienna.

The book was written by Gabriele Andeerl and Walter Manoschek. The title
is: Gescheiterte Flucht. Der jüdische 'Kladovo-Transport' auf dem WEg
nach Palästina 1939-42.

In its appendix it includes a list of everybody on the transport.

My own grandfather Jakob Rosenstrauch was on the transport. A memorial
was held in Zasavica, Sabac and Kladovo in 2003 which I attended
together with other grandchildren.

I can't see the name of the person you are searching for, therefore I
could nok look in the book for you.

Yours

Helen Krag, Copenhagen


ViewMate Romanian translation request #romania

Alice
 

I have posted a marriage certificate in Romanian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75630. Please
respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page. Thank you
very much. All help is greatly appreciated.

Alice Riley


Re: Help in locating towns/cities/villages in Hungarian region of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and in Eastern Poland/Western Russia or Ukraine

tom
 

there is an online 1913 gazetteer of pre-trianon hungary at <http;//www.bogardi.com/>. it maps the towns for you, and even indicates the present-day country.


....... tom klein, toronto


Szymon SOLDINGER and Ena GRUBNER

shaul berger
 

Hi,

Either Szymon or Ena are supposed to be second or third cousins of my father-in-law, Alexander Neuman. Alexander Neuman was born in 1907 in Szymbark (near Gorlice) in 1907 to Chaim Joachim Neuman and Erna Schell.

Szymon (Shimek) Soldinger was born in Krakow on 9/5/1905. His wife Ena Grubner was born in Gorlice on 5/20 1910. After WWII they left Poland to England. Their son is Stephen. I am guessing that Ancestry UK may have some data about them.

Potential connections can be via Neuman, Schell or Grubner (first wife of Alexander Neuman) branches. I did extensive search on Krakow related websites as well as JewishGen, JRI and Geni. So far I failed to get anything for Ena or Szymon. Alexander Neuman  is part oif my familky tree located on JewishGe as well as Geni.com. 

Any help appreciated. 
 
 Thanks
 
 Shaul Berger
 California
 
BRUMER, RETTIG, WATTENBERG (Zolkiew, Rawa Russka);
HUTTER, KIFLIG, HERZIG, WATTENBERG (Jaroslaw, Przemysl,
Dobromil, Stanislawow);
BERGER & SPITZER (Szecseny, Shirkovce, Prague);
POSNER, LICHTSZAJN (Warsaw); EHRENREICH (Warsaw/Miechow);
SCHELL & RIEGER (Gorlice); NEUMANN, FADENHECHT & NACHT (Krakow, Buczacz)


Re: Repatriation 1945-7: Russia to Poland

Judy Brandspigel
 

Shirley: I am answering you on behalf of my husband, Mike, who was born in Warsaw, Poland in 1936, spent the war years in Kazan, Russia and was then repatriated by train to Poland after the war. He was 9 years old when they left Russia and remembers the events quite vividly. I’m posting this to the list rather than just to you personally as I believe it might be interesting to all. Although Kazan is about 1500 miles, as the crow flies, from Novosibirsk, I would imagine the experience would be similar.

After the war ended in 1945, the Polish Jews in Kazan were told that they were being repatriated to Poland. About 2 months before the date of departure they were told to start preparing for a journey that might take several weeks. They were told to hang and dry pieces of bread; gather together tins of sardines or other tinned food; to prepare Kielbasa or other preserved meats. This was early in 1946. It was still winter in Kazan when they left.

Two days before the journey, 50 filthy cattle cars were brought in. They had to be cleaned out completely by the future occupants. They were provided with wood planks with which they were told to construct 2 wide shelves at either end of each car, to be used for sleeping platforms. Each car was to hold 30 or 40 people. When the cars were ready, the men themselves had to manually move them from the sidings to form a train behind the engine.

In the middle of each car was a coal stove. Bags of coal were provided. It was very hot in the cars as the stoves were kept going day and night. A pail in the corner served as a communal toilet which was emptied when necessary through the opening in the cattle car while the train was moving. Any daylight they had came from a window high up in the car.

Their water was the snow that they got from the sides of the tracks when the train was stopped and melted on the stove. It was used for drinking, for cooking and for rudimentary cleanliness. They ate the food that they had brought with them and occasionally were able to buy some potatoes and carrots from farmers when they stopped. One time a farmer came and sold them a live cow. Someone among them slaughtered the cow and it was divided up. No possible edible part was discarded. The pieces were cooked on the coal stoves. (My husband thinks it was all boiled in pots.)

When the train stopped the children were allowed outside to run around. Otherwise they played quietly in their cars, read books that they had with them, talked, and slept.

After 36 days with multiple stops (some as long as 6 days on a siding) and a journey of many miles the train arrived in a town called Petrolesha. (sp?) in Poland. (My husband thinks it was near the German border but we cannot find it on the map.) The train was stopped for a few hours and my father-in-law went looking for food to buy to continue the journey. All of a sudden he was accosted by a young man who recognized him—it was Hershel, his brother-in-law whom he had last seen 8 years previously when Hershel was 15 and whom my father-in-law thought was dead! (That’s a whole other story!). So my husband’s family got off the train to live with Hershel. This was in the spring of 1946.

The family lived in Petrolesha for several months until they heard of the pogrom in Kielce. As well, the Communists were taking over the town and nationalizing any businesses. Fearful of pogroms happening in Petrolesha they decided to leave Poland. Whoever it was who organized this exodus (my husband thinks it might have been UNRA) advised them to destroy all papers and photos that had any Yiddish, Hebrew or Polish writing on them. Thus they had no documents and few mementos. They walked for 2 or 3 days, a caravan of refugees, foraging food from farmers’ fields when they could find anything, until they reached the Austrian border. There they were given shelter in a former concentration camp. From there, after 3 or 4 days they were transported by train to a DP camp-Hassenhaeke- near Kassel Germany, where they spent the next 2 years, finally emigrating to Canada in 1948.

I hope this is helpful to you. If you have any questions please email me. My husband is more than willing to help you if he can.

Judy Winstan Brandspigel


Re: Photo request- Los Angeles, CA

binyaminkerman@...
 

Hi Barbara,
Thanks for the suggestion. It was actually me that added them to Find a Grave yesterday, and I did request photos there but I don't really have much knowledge of their website and how likely people are to respond there.


ViewMate Romanian translation request

Alice
 

I have posted a marriage certificate in Romanian for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75630. Please
respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page. Thank you
very much. All help is greatly appreciated. Alice Riley


ViewMate Romanian translation request

Alice
 

I have posted a marriage certificate in Romanian for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75630. Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page. Thank you very much. All help is greatly appreciated. Alice Riley

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