Date   

Need help with a Russian translation and photo ID, early 1900s. Plus, any thoughts to ID the photo of passengers on a ship

N. Summers
 

I have posted to ViewMate a photograph (#76789) and the reverse side with a handwritten note (#76789). The photograph is of a crowd of (immigrant? ) passengers on a ship. The note is addressed to “Esther”, whom I believe to be my great-aunt Esther Finkelstein; she came to the US from Poland/Ukraine before 1920. 

The note is in good condition but the handwriting is small, so it could  be quite a challenge to read. I have tried to improve the quality of the image but if there’s anything more I can do please let me know.

Thank you

Nancy S. 
Maryland USA

FINKELSTEIN, LUSMAN (Radzivilov, Ukraine) 
BOOKSTEIN/BUCHSTEIN (Ostrog, Poland)
LEAF/LIFSHITZ (Rechitsa)
ALPER/LISS (Ukraine)




ViewMate translation request - Polish #poland

Colin Cohn
 

Please provide a translation >from Polish of the 1922 marriage record of
my relative Mattel GOTTESMAN to Aron Meier GOTTESMANN, who was probably
her half uncle.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM77811

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Regards,
Colin Cohn
Sydney, Australia

Researching: Bolechow FUCHS, GOTTESMANN, GRUS, KRAUSHAAR, REDLER


Re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England

Jill Whitehead
 

There were various different ports on both the East Coast of the UK and West Coast that were engaged in either North Sea/Baltic or Atlantic shipping respectively. We have already mentioned Hull and Grimsby, which were either side of the Humber estuary on the borders of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire.  But there was also Leith, which is still the port for Edinburgh in Scotland. My Brown (formerly Brin) family of Edinburgh travelled from Vishtinetz in Suwalki Gubernia (now Vistytis in Lithuania) to Leith via Sweden (so the family history goes). And some of my lines married other Landsmen who had family who stayed in Sweden, and I link up via DNA with one such family, who came via Hull to Manchester, but had some family who stayed in Sweden. Of my family (who all came from the Suwalki Lomza gubernias in the 1860's and 1870's), one line came direct to Hull and stayed there, one went from Hull to Liverpool (probably with the intention of going to USA but they stayed in Liverpool), one went from Hull to Manchester via Liverpool, and the 4th line went to Leith and then Edinburgh. The Maritime Museums in both Hull and Liverpool are other useful sources of information on emigration and shipping. 

On the West Coast, Liverpool and Glasgow were the main ports, and they went to a variety of different US and Canadian destinations including New York, Boston and Halifax, Nova Scotia. A variety of German, Dutch and Swedish ports were used to travel across the Baltic and North Sea, including Hamburg, Libau, Konigsberg, Rotterdam, Stockholm and others. The reference to Hull Amerika will be to the boat line which used the Hamburg-Hull-Liverpool-USA route.
There were a number of competing lines/routes, especially when steam ships/faster stream ships came in. Hull University is the place that has documented the lines/routes.

Jill Whitehead, Surrey, UK


Re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England

bernerfolk
 

There are entry records for immigrants who came to the US via Canada.  People were ticketed through to their destination in the US via rail, and in some cases, ferry.  Except for very early in the migration period, the US stationed inspectors in Canada.  There they did the same evaluation on passengers arriving at Canadian ports as they did at US ports. 

Immigrants who passed the inspection/evaluation were given a slip of paper documenting their clearance for transit to the US.  Those who didn't clear were deported directly from Canada.

People who had spent less than a month in Canada presented their arrival 'pass' [my word] when boarding the train for their destination in the US, no pass...no boarding. 

The documents recording their arrival are frequently called the St. Albans files, although they cover most of the US-Canada border and not just people coming through VT.  I have not found them on FS, here's a link to the search page for the main collection on Ancestry (Detroit is separate):
https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1075/ 

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


Re: Pale of Settlement

ROBERT MITCHELL
 

For those of you interested in what the Pale of Settlement during the nineteenth century, see Robert Mitchell's Human Geographies Within the Pale of Settlement: Order and Disorder During the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries, Macmillan-Palgrave, 2018/9


Re: Response re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England

rv Kaplan
 

There are no passenger arrival records for immigrants coming from Europe to UK at this time.

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland

On Mon, 20 Jan 2020 at 15:25, Enzo Falco <enzofalco@...> wrote:
I have a relative that traveled from Libau to England and then by train to Liverpool in 1906. Are there passenger records for ships arriving in Hull England in 1906?

Enzo Falco
Belmont, Massachusetts
USA


Re: Zeliviansky Slonim - Stavropol

bernerfolk
 

Vladimir,

Where did you find records for Slonim?

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


Re: Response re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England

Enzo Falco
 

I have a relative that traveled from Libau to England and then by train to Liverpool in 1906. Are there passenger records for ships arriving in Hull England in 1906?

Enzo Falco
Belmont, Massachusetts
USA


Re: Buying false papers

Steve Stein
 

I think every case was different. Our synagogue just this week lost one of our survivors. He was born with the surname Steinberg; at the end of the war, as a de facto leader of a group, he had a pile of exit visas to come to the US. He had one for himself, but one of the young men in his circle did not. So he gave the Steinberg papers to him, and eventually got another set of papers in the name of Blumenfeld, which he used. I don't know if he tracked the progress of the new Mr. Steinberg, but he died and was buried with the surname Blumenfeld.

Steve Stein
Highland Park, NJ


From Maud #austria-czech

mbeer@...
 

Dear friends,
I am 90 years old. I presume you did not know that.
Still reading (4 languages) still using the PC as you see.
With greetings >from Tel Aviv, Maud Mihal Beer, nee Stecklmacher,
born in Prostejov, have been in ghetto Theresienstadt three years - survived!

Maud Beer


Re: Maiming to Avoid the Russian Draft?

Esther
 

My grandfather Zacharia Marcus,originally from Sveksna,Lithuania chanaged his age from younger to older and visa-versa to avoid the draft. Therfore his exact age was not known.When he died, he was 74 according to his documents; but my mothe velived tht he was really older.His cousin (the father o Edgar and GilbertSimon) cut of 2 of his fingers. There was a butcher Moshe in Crown Heights, Brooklyn NY, who was drafted; but managed to escape.


Zeliviansky Slonim - Stavropol

Vladimir Oksman
 

My great-grandfather Isaac son of Abram Zeliviansky was born in Slonim, Belarus at 1851. He established his family in Stavropol, Russia.
He and his wife Leah had 14 children.
One of them is my grandfather, 2 others died as children. I was able to find the families of the rest except:
Rakhel, DOB 12/8/1880. She married David son of Abram Zeliviansky (possibly her uncle) on 12/31/1902.
Nekhama, DOB 4/2/1890
Mordechai, DOB 6/15/1983. The last known his trace is WW1 award in 1915.
If anybody has any relation would be happy to discuss.
Thanks&Regards,
Vladimir
NJ


ViewMate translation request - Polish #galicia

alan moskowitz
 

This is my first time seeking help and hopefully am going about it correctly.
 
I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
 
I have just found a translation for the column headings so I do not need those and please ignore the request in the viewmate for  translation of the column headings.  Josef Zuker and Chancie Teitel are my great-great-grandparents.  
 
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.
 
Alan Moskowitz
New  Jersey, USA


Response re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England

Sherri Venezia
 

Yes, many took the “direct” route....for example Hamburg to NY, but many chose the less expensive “indirect” route, requiring travel from the European port to the East coast of England, such as to Hull, then continuing the journey in pre-arranged rail connection to Liverpool where a different ship would be boarded to the final destination such as NY. I had wondered where my grandfather departed from, knowing that ( he told me many years ago and I had verified through Ellis Island records) that he sailed from Liverpool to NY. In studying carefully the other passengers origin point on the ship departing from Liverpool, many had started in Libau, which then confirmed my hypothesis that he left Russia, through Lithuania, then took the “indirect” first part of his immigration at Libau, sailing to Hull, then on by rail to Liverpool.

Sherri Venezia,
Davis, Ca

Researching: TODRIN ( Orsha), ROTTENBERG, KURZ, KORN, GERBER, HOROWITZ, MUNZER ( E. Galicia), LEVINSKY , FRANZ (Poland), WALDMAN (Russian Empire).


Re: Maiming to Avoid the Russian Draft?

Judywolk
 

My Great Grandfather was a butcher in Yampol, Ukraine and he chopped off his thumb to avoid being drafted. We have a photo to show it.
Judy Wolkovitch


Zelda Fridson: Translation from Russian needed

Bob Silverstein
 

I need the Russian portion of the entry for Zelda Fridson translated.  It is in upper right corner.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM77799

Thanks, 
Bob Silverstein
bobsilverstein@...


Zelda Fridson: Translation from Yiddish needed

Bob Silverstein
 

I need the Yiddish portion of the entry for Zelda Fridson translated.  It is in upper right corner.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM77800

Thanks, 
Bob Silverstein
bobsilverstein@...


Phoenix (Arizona) Jewish Genealogy Group - 26 Jan 2020

Emily Garber
 

The Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group, a committee of the Arizona Jewish Historical Society, will hold its next meeting on Sunday, January 26, 2020 at 1:00 P.M. at The New Shul, 7825 E Paradise Ln, Scottsdale, AZ 85260. The meeting is free of charge and open to all.

Dr. Janette Silverman will present " 'A' My name is Alice - What's in a Name?"

Our immigrant ancestors left behind many questions after they arrived in their new home, some of which can be answered by finding records and carefully examining them. This discussion will focus on the mysteries of first names. Did Yetta Trachtenberg really have two brothers both named Samuel? What are the research techniques that can be used to unravel the mysteries of names? What tools can we use to perform an exhaustive search as genealogy research standards require?

Dr. Janette Silverman is a Senior Genealogist, Research Team Manager at AncestryProGenealogists®. Her team of 10 researchers specializes in Eastern European and Jewish research. She recently traveled to England, Poland and Lithuania doing research in various archival repositories.  When she travels she maintains a blog at RelativaTree.wordpress.com .

Janette is a member of the Board of IAJGS. She was the JewishGen Ukraine SIG Coordinator for 6 years, 2017 JewishGen Volunteer of the Year, the 2016 Chair of the IAJGS conference in Seattle, and was, for many years, the Chair of the Phoenix JGS. Janette speaks at conferences and groups worldwide, most recently presenting at RootsTech London. Upcoming presentations include Limud Arizona 2020, Rootstech 2020, the National Genealogical Society, US Holocaust Memorial Museum and, with Emily Garber and Lara Diamond, a week of study about Jewish Genealogy at the Genealogy Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP).

Janette has been involved in Jewish and Eastern European genealogical research for almost 40 years. It began as a hobby with her dad and became a career. Her doctoral dissertation, In Living Memory describes the origins and immigration of four branches of her family, contextualizing their lives from their European origins to their lives in the United States.

For further information about the Phoenix Jewish Genealogy Group, see our web page at https://azjhs.org/Genealogy.html


Emily Garber


Re: Pale of Settlement

Vladimir Oksman
 

Most of the "Russian" Jews are from Pale. 
My great-grandfather Isaac Zeliviansky originally is from Slonim, Belarus. Slonim was inside Pale. He got permit to live outside Pale, in Stavropol, Russia. He got it because his profession - tailor, his specialization was hats. He just have found his profession is in demand there, in Stavropol. He moved from Pale at 1876. Interestingly he still listed in all records as "Slonim meshanin".


JGS of Illinois Jan. 26 program on Library of Congress research resources

Martin Fischer
 

“Family History Resources from the Library of Congress” will be the topic of a presentation by genealogist Tina Beaird at the Sunday, Jan. 26, 2020, meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois. Her presentation will begin at 2 p.m. at Temple Beth-El, 3610 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Illinois.

The JGSI meeting facilities at Temple Beth-El will open at 12:30 p.m. for those who want to use or borrow genealogy library materials, get help with genealogy websites or ask genealogical questions from genealogy expert volunteers before the main program begins at 2 p.m. For more information, see  https://jgsi.org/event-3573917 or phone 312-666-0100.

Our speaker, Tina Beaird, is the owner of Tamarack Genealogy and is a genealogy and local history librarian at the Plainfield Public Library. She holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree with a specialization in archives/preservation from Dominican University. She has won multiple research and digitization grants to preserve and digitize historic documents and photographs.

Currently, she is a board director of the Illinois State Genealogical Society, the Northern Illinois Historic League and the Illinois State Historic Records Advisory Board as well as a commissioner for the Illinois World War One Centennial Commission. Tina is also an active member of the Society of American Archivists and the American Library Association. She volunteers, as time permits, for Illinois history and genealogical societies.


Tina Beaird lectures at the national, state and local levels on topics including genealogical methodology, military records and archival preservation. She has offered assistance to researchers for over 15 years and occasionally still finds time to conduct her own family research, which she has been pursuing for over 20 years.

At each regular JGSI monthly meeting, a “help desk” operates from 12:30 to 1:55 p.m. Expert member volunteers access online databases and answer genealogical questions one-on-one for members and visitors as time allows.

The JGSI library has more than 800 volumes of interest to Jewish family historians. Many are available for borrowing by JGSI members for a limited time. All are available for perusing from 12:30 to 1:55 p.m. at each regular monthly meeting.

Family history researchers with ancestors who lived in the Chicago area should search for their names in the the JGSI Jewish Chicago Database (JJCD) at https://jgsi.org/JGSI-Jewish-Chicago-Database

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois

--
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois

JGSI website: https://jgsi.org

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