Date   

Re: Bayside Cemetery and Acacia Cemetery, Queens

David Lewin
 

Andy Monat's email gives me an opening to share a problem:-

The late Florence Lesser Marmor (1933-2018) and David Roy Gevertzman (1945-2007), together with a bunch of other volunteers [ I do not know who they were] devoted much of their time and effort to recording the burials at Mokom Sholom  Bayside and Accacia cmeteries.

I was the "safety depository" for backups of Florence's research and I am currently attempting to create a working web site for that part of the Florence research which I posses.

When she died Florence left an enormous collection of paper records which are still being assembled by her children.   I hope one day to get sight of that archive and compare it with what I already have electronically.

Right now I am working on a spreadsheet with about 12,700 individual burials.  It is currently in .xlsx format.

The spreadsheet has column headings
Family Name  
Personal name
TYPE                   [ monument. vault, mostly empty field in the data ]
Notes                   [often with "death cert #"  and undertaker age, cause of death, congregation, gate number  etc etc ]
Record No by cemetery

I am NOT a web site writer and would welcome anyone who can tell me how this can be turned into a decent, searchable web site.

Simply putting a spread sheet of that size onto a web site means that it will take an endless time to download.

Merely searching for a name is NOT good enough.   For that the enquirer would need to know how a person was recorded.  With the multitude of geographic origins of the names, spelling variations are endless. 
David = Dovid  is just one example of very many.  

The researcher may want to know not just "where is XY buried"  but often which people of a particular surname are buried there?  Do they relate to one another?  You simply cannot see that on a page which tells you about a single individual.

I would like the web site at the same time to be a memorial to Florence and David .   I do not  know where  that can be parked,   I do not think Jewisgen is the place.   Its rules are too rigid.

I would welcome ideas and suggestions.  I am struggling.

David Lewin
London


At 02:57 25/01/2020, Andy Monat wrote:

Bayside Cemetery in Queens, New York has been much discussed on this mailing list over the years, but there do not appear to have been any updates from people who have visited it recently. Since I visited in fall of 2019, I thought I would share what I learned which was not clear to me from the numerous news stories which can be found online. I have no affiliation with any of these cemeteries.

Bayside is operated by Congregation Shaare Zedek. Their web site http://www.sznyc.org has information about the cemetery; see especially http://www.sznyc.org/frequently-asked-questions-bayside-cemetery. That page also lists their email address office@.... When I wrote that email address, I received a reply including a map of the cemetery including the names of the burial societies, which proved very useful; that map was basically identical to the one at http://www.baysidecemeterylitigation.com/uploads/BaysideCemetery-Map-WWW.pdf . I also asked them about specific names of people I knew were buried there, and the office staff kindly searched the records. Their information is limited, but they did find some of the people I asked about.

Bayside is part of the same complex as two other cemeteries, bounded by 80th St on the west, 84th St on the east, Liberty Ave on the north, and Pitkin Ave on the south. The western part of the complex is Mokom Shalom cemetery, which I did not research. The central part is Bayside. The eastern part is Acacia cemetery. The exterior of the complex is enclosed by metal fences, but as far as I could tell there were no fences between the different cemeteries. Not only is there nothing preventing you from walking from Acacia into Bayside, it might not even be obvious to you that you have done so.

The area was industrial on the north side and residential on the east and west sides. It seemed perfectly safe to us.

I was interested in burials in both Acacia and Bayside. My relatives and I parked on Liberty Ave, near the Acacia entrance. Note that the elevated A train of the New York City Subway runs above Liberty Ave. The entrance gate is through the center of a two-story building which must have formerly been the Acacia office; now there are no on-site office staff, but a call to their phone number which I found on Google Maps and FindAGrave (718-845-9240) reached staff located elsewhere who were able to look up burials in Acacia and tell me which section they would be found in.

I had brought a hand-drawn map passed down to me by a distant relative, made at least a few decades ago. It listed certain things that clearly matched the map of Bayside, once I was able to decipher the handwriting, such as Liberty Ave, Pitkin Ave, Acacia, various gate numbers, "restrooms" (just inside the Acadia entrance; these are no longer operational but there were portable toilets nearby), names of relatives buried there, and then some names I didn't recognize like Moe Levy. These last turned out to be landmarks - they were names on large mausoleums, which make for easy navigation as they can be spotted from some distance away.

A relative who came with me had found and brought photographs from the 1970s of my elderly great-grandmother and her siblings visiting the cemetery, including photos of them standing at their mother's grave. The old photos of their mother Sara Scheinzeit's grave were especially helpful, since they made clear it can be seen from outside the cemetery, on the sidewalk! (See my current-day photos of it at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/128107217/chaya-sarah-scheinzeit and note the fence is the exterior cemetery fence; you'll also find other relatives linked from that page.)

After entering via the Acacia gate, we quickly found graves of relatives in Acacia's Mariam Polen section, near the north fence. Following the old hand-drawn map, we walked west a hundred feet or so and were in Bayside, where we saw Sara Scheinzeit's grave from the other side. That and the other parts of Bayside we visited were in much better shape than I had expected. There was some broken glass just inside the fence, but most of the graves we saw were upright and not overgrown with trees or other plants. The ones made of hard stone were perfectly legible, though some gates were made of soft stone which has weathered as is typical, and parts of them were illegible.

In Bayside, we visited gate 44 (Mariam Polen Congregation; same society as we visited in Acacia), and gate 74 (Congregation Kol Israel Anshi Polen Swalk No. 1). We found graves for people with the surnames SCHEINZEIT, SCHONZEIT, DUBERSTEIN, and SCHNEIDER.

I would be happy to try to answer questions from people who have them, though this email contains most of what I know about Bayside and Acacia.

Andy Monat
Massachusetts, USA


Re: Professional genealogist? (Russia to London migration in early 19th century)

jamehar@...
 

Thank you for your questions.
 
The CMJ is 'the Church's Ministry Among the Jews'. It used to be called the 'London Jews' Society' and the 'London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews'. As far as I can tell it offered a free education, while using this to push people to convert to Christianity. The organisation still exists, and I've been in contact with them about getting access to their archives at the Bodleian library (but they've been very unhelpful).
 
The most distant marriage certificate I've been able to find is for my ancestor Raphael Marks (he married an Emma Furse in 1859 [in a church and she seems to be Christian] and their oldest son [my ancestor - also called Raphael Marks] was a pupil at the CMJ school in 1861). Also in the 1861 census, it states that the Raphael senior was from 'Russia'. Our oral family history has it that Raphael moved to London from 'somewhere in the east' and that he was a rabbi (this came from a 102 year old cousin back in 2009, but I've not been able to confirm it). On Raphael senior's marriage certificate from 1859, it states that his father's name was 'Samuel' (I don't know if he came to London or not).

The younger Raphael was known to the 102 year old cousin, and so we are certain of his identity (DNA matches also connect me to the descendants of his brothers, who emigrated to the US - the US descendants haven't researched further back than me). While there are some age discrepancies between census records for Raphael junior, I'm sure that the Raphael/Emma above were his parents, as he used her surname 'Furse' as a middle name for one of his daughters (and one of his sisters also had this middle name). 


Bayside Cemetery and Acacia Cemetery, Queens

Andy Monat
 

Bayside Cemetery in Queens, New York has been much discussed on this mailing list over the years, but there do not appear to have been any updates from people who have visited it recently. Since I visited in fall of 2019, I thought I would share what I learned which was not clear to me from the numerous news stories which can be found online. I have no affiliation with any of these cemeteries.

Bayside is operated by Congregation Shaare Zedek. Their web site http://www.sznyc.org has information about the cemetery; see especially http://www.sznyc.org/frequently-asked-questions-bayside-cemetery. That page also lists their email address office@.... When I wrote that email address, I received a reply including a map of the cemetery including the names of the burial societies, which proved very useful; that map was basically identical to the one at http://www.baysidecemeterylitigation.com/uploads/BaysideCemetery-Map-WWW.pdf. I also asked them about specific names of people I knew were buried there, and the office staff kindly searched the records. Their information is limited, but they did find some of the people I asked about.

Bayside is part of the same complex as two other cemeteries, bounded by 80th St on the west, 84th St on the east, Liberty Ave on the north, and Pitkin Ave on the south. The western part of the complex is Mokom Shalom cemetery, which I did not research. The central part is Bayside. The eastern part is Acacia cemetery. The exterior of the complex is enclosed by metal fences, but as far as I could tell there were no fences between the different cemeteries. Not only is there nothing preventing you from walking from Acacia into Bayside, it might not even be obvious to you that you have done so.

The area was industrial on the north side and residential on the east and west sides. It seemed perfectly safe to us.

I was interested in burials in both Acacia and Bayside. My relatives and I parked on Liberty Ave, near the Acacia entrance. Note that the elevated A train of the New York City Subway runs above Liberty Ave. The entrance gate is through the center of a two-story building which must have formerly been the Acacia office; now there are no on-site office staff, but a call to their phone number which I found on Google Maps and FindAGrave (718-845-9240) reached staff located elsewhere who were able to look up burials in Acacia and tell me which section they would be found in.

I had brought a hand-drawn map passed down to me by a distant relative, made at least a few decades ago. It listed certain things that clearly matched the map of Bayside, once I was able to decipher the handwriting, such as Liberty Ave, Pitkin Ave, Acacia, various gate numbers, "restrooms" (just inside the Acadia entrance; these are no longer operational but there were portable toilets nearby), names of relatives buried there, and then some names I didn't recognize like Moe Levy. These last turned out to be landmarks - they were names on large mausoleums, which make for easy navigation as they can be spotted from some distance away.

A relative who came with me had found and brought photographs from the 1970s of my elderly great-grandmother and her siblings visiting the cemetery, including photos of them standing at their mother's grave. The old photos of their mother Sara Scheinzeit's grave were especially helpful, since they made clear it can be seen from outside the cemetery, on the sidewalk! (See my current-day photos of it at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/128107217/chaya-sarah-scheinzeit and note the fence is the exterior cemetery fence; you'll also find other relatives linked from that page.)

After entering via the Acacia gate, we quickly found graves of relatives in Acacia's Mariam Polen section, near the north fence. Following the old hand-drawn map, we walked west a hundred feet or so and were in Bayside, where we saw Sara Scheinzeit's grave from the other side. That and the other parts of Bayside we visited were in much better shape than I had expected. There was some broken glass just inside the fence, but most of the graves we saw were upright and not overgrown with trees or other plants. The ones made of hard stone were perfectly legible, though some gates were made of soft stone which has weathered as is typical, and parts of them were illegible.

In Bayside, we visited gate 44 (Mariam Polen Congregation; same society as we visited in Acacia), and gate 74 (Congregation Kol Israel Anshi Polen Swalk No. 1). We found graves for people with the surnames SCHEINZEIT, SCHONZEIT, DUBERSTEIN, and SCHNEIDER.

I would be happy to try to answer questions from people who have them, though this email contains most of what I know about Bayside and Acacia.

Andy Monat
Massachusetts, USA


Re: Two NYC Birth Certificates: One person or two?

Deborah Blankenberg
 

I can't be certain, but I strongly suspect that the first (#968), filed just a few days after the birth, had several errors that were corrected on the second. As far as the number of children is concerned, note that the first section is the number of previous births, which would not include the current one, so 8 previous births and 9 now living indicates that all of the previous children are still living. It's too bad that the stamp in the upper left corner is illegible on the second certificate. Knowing what date it was filed might help clear up the mysteries. 
--
Deborah Blankenberg (JewishGen ID #613395)
Lodi, CA
dtblankenberg@... 
Researching BLOCH/BLOCK (Germany to New York, Colombia and Missouri), BLINDER (Kishinev to New York via Poland? and Paris), KUSHER/KUSZER (Lodz vicinity to New York via Paris), GOLDSCHMIDT (Germany)


Addendum: (US) USCIS Extends Comments on USCIS Proposed Rate Increase To February 10, 2020. #Records Access # USCIS

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Please see this addendum.


Jan

 

 

I want to add something for those of you writing comments on the outrageous fees--—and  hope that is many of you!.

 

I have been advised that duplicate comments without supplemental comments added will be ignore. So when you write, and have submitted previous comments, please add something to you original comments or they will be disregarded.

Note the 492% increase is for paper records $65 to $385. The outrageous fee for electronic record is “only” $381  $130 to $625.

 

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

From: Records Access <recordsaccess@...>
Sent: Friday, January 24, 2020 2:46 PM
To: IAJGS Public Records Access Alert <records-access-alerts@...>
Subject: (US) USCIS Extends Comments on USCIS Proposed Rate Increase To February 10, 2020.

 

 

On November 15 the IAJGS Records Access Alert posted about the outrageous USCIS Proposed Fee Increases. IAJGS Records Access Alert also posted about an extension for comments on December 6 to December 30.  On January 24 the USCIS proposed a reopening of the deadline to February 10,2020.

 

The other changes do no effect the genealogy program.  This supplemental information describes the projected costs associated with supporting immigration adjudication and naturalization services for which USCIS will reimburse U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

 

The issue for genealogists is: The current proposal of raising the search fee from $65 to $240 and then the cost of the actual file from $65 to $385 means your charges will increase from $130 to $625.  This would equate to a 492% increase in fees

 

To read the proposed rule extension see:  https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2020/01/24/2020-01189/us-citizenship-and-immigration-services-fee-schedule-and-changes-to-certain-other-immigration

To read the proposed rule itself see: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2019-11-14/pdf/2019-24366.pdf

The Genealogy section is Section N which starts on page 62315-62316.

See Section 103.40 for Genealogical Research Requests on page 62359. Instructions: All submissions received must include DHS Docket No. USCIS-2019-0010. Providing comments is entirely voluntary. All comments received will be posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information that you provide. Because the information you submit will be publicly available, you should consider limiting the amount of personal information in your submission

You must submit comments, identified as DHS Docket No. USCIS-2019-0010, through one of the following methods:

  • Federal eRulemaking Portal (preferred): http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the website instructions for submitting comments.
  • Mail: Samantha Deshommes, Chief, Regulatory Coordination Division, Office of Policy and Strategy, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security, 20 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20529-2140. To ensure proper handling, please reference DHS Docket No. USCIS-2019-0010 in your correspondence. Mail must be postmarked by the comment submission deadline.

Comments submitted in a manner other than those listed above, including emails or letters sent to DHS or USCIS officials, will not be considered comments on the proposed rule. Please note that DHS and USCIS cannot accept any comments that are hand delivered or couriered. In addition, USCIS cannot accept mailed comments contained on any form of digital media storage devices, such as CDs/DVDs and USB drives.

Remember to view the Records not Revenues Coalition website  https://www.recordsnotrevenue.com/ for more information and the portal where you may send in comments and links for you to contact your US Senators and Representatives.  The website is not yet updated with the latest extension but it will be soon and the information about the outrageous fee increases are correct. The website at time of this post shows he first deadline extension but as the Federal Register of January 24 shows the deadline is extended again to February 10. Even if you submitted a statement the first time do so again. USIS is required to reply to EACH comment they receive

 

To see previous postings about the USCIS and the proposed fee increases,  go to the archives of the IAJGS Records Access Alert at:  http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/. You must be registered to access the archives.  To register go to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts  and follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which genealogical  organization with whom you are affiliated   You will receive an email response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Sare Czarne Margulies

Richard Gross
 

Due to my post on 14 January I've broken down this brick wall and found family connections. Thank you to everyone. This forum is definitely wonderful. Beulah Gross


(US) USCIS Extends Comments on USCIS Proposed Rate Increase To February 10, 2020. #Records Access # USCIS

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

On November 15 the IAJGS Records Access Alert posted about the outrageous USCIS Proposed Fee Increases. IAJGS Records Access Alert also posted about an extension for comments on December 6 to December 30.  On January 24 the USCIS proposed a reopening of the deadline to :

February 10, 2020.

 

The other changes do no effect the genealogy program.  This supplemental information describes the projected costs associated with supporting immigration adjudication and naturalization services for which USCIS will reimburse U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

 

The issue for genealogists is: The current proposal of raising the search fee from $65 to $240 and then the cost of the actual file from $65 to $385 means your charges will increase from $130 to $625.  This would equate to a 492% increase in fees

 

To read the proposed rule extension see:  https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2020/01/24/2020-01189/us-citizenship-and-immigration-services-fee-schedule-and-changes-to-certain-other-immigration

To read the proposed rule itself see: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2019-11-14/pdf/2019-24366.pdf

The Genealogy section is Section N which starts on page 62315-62316.

See Section 103.40 for Genealogical Research Requests on page 62359. Instructions: All submissions received must include DHS Docket No. USCIS-2019-0010. Providing comments is entirely voluntary. All comments received will be posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information that you provide. Because the information you submit will be publicly available, you should consider limiting the amount of personal information in your submission

You must submit comments, identified as DHS Docket No. USCIS-2019-0010, through one of the following methods:

  • Federal eRulemaking Portal (preferred): http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the website instructions for submitting comments.
  • Mail: Samantha Deshommes, Chief, Regulatory Coordination Division, Office of Policy and Strategy, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security, 20 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20529-2140. To ensure proper handling, please reference DHS Docket No. USCIS-2019-0010 in your correspondence. Mail must be postmarked by the comment submission deadline.

Comments submitted in a manner other than those listed above, including emails or letters sent to DHS or USCIS officials, will not be considered comments on the proposed rule. Please note that DHS and USCIS cannot accept any comments that are hand delivered or couriered. In addition, USCIS cannot accept mailed comments contained on any form of digital media storage devices, such as CDs/DVDs and USB drives.

Remember to view the Records not Revenues Coalition website  https://www.recordsnotrevenue.com/ for more information and the portal where you may send in comments and links for you to contact your US Senators and Representatives.  The website is not yet updated with the latest extension but it will be soon and the information about the outrageous fee increases are correct. The website at time of this post shows he first deadline extension but as the Federal Register of January 24 shows the deadline is extended again to February 10. Even if you submitted a statement the first time do so again. USIS is required to reply to EACH comment they receive

 

To see previous postings about the USCIS and the proposed fee increases,  go to the archives of the IAJGS Records Access Alert at:  http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/. You must be registered to access the archives.  To register go to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts  and follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which genealogical  organization with whom you are affiliated   You will receive an email response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Trying to get a picture of a gravestone in Shalom Memorial Park Cemetery, Chicago area #usa

steverose47@...
 

I can help too. Same issues though. Mostly snow covered. Always glad to lend a hand. May have to wait a while, up to 6" of snow expected by tomorrow!

Steve Rosenzweig
Buffalo Grove, IL


This is a test

Avraham Groll
 

Please ignore this message.

--

Avraham Groll

Executive Director

JewishGen.org

Edmond J. Safra Plaza | 36 Battery Place | New York, NY | 10280

646.437.4326 agroll@...

Visit us at JewishGen.org


Re: Professional genealogist? (Russia to London migration in early 19th century)

Irina Fridman
 

Can you please give the specific info as much as you know, especially about the date/s the family moved? The events in Russia might give a clue as to the reasons for the move, such as the military campaigns for example.

The national archives have naturalisation records, which provide the name of the place of origin. However, it’s hard to advise with no specifics.

What is CMJ?

Irina


Re: Trying to get a picture of a gravestone in Shalom Memorial Park Cemetery, Chicago area #usa

Barbara Kenzer
 

I would be happy to take pictures for you. My family is buried there, but the problem being all the graves are are flat and covered in snow, so it is possible to find any graves now. 
Let me know. No cost needed.

Barbara Kenzer
Buffalo Grove IL USA


On Fri, Jan 24, 2020, 1:36 PM Roy Ogus <r_ogus@...> wrote:
I am trying to find someone who would be willing to visit the Shalom Memorial Park Cemetery, Skokie, in the Chicago area to take a picture of a gravestone of one of my family members.  The exact address of the cemetery is 1700 W. Rand Road, Arlington Heights, IL 60004

I can supply more details of the names of the deceased individuals and the gravestone location if you are able to help me.

I would appreciate hearing from anyone would would be able to do this for me.  I will be glad to reimburse you for any expenses involved.  Please reply to me privately.

Many thanks!

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California
r_ogus@...


Need translation of a hand-written Cyrillic birth record from Poland (VM77901). Thank you. #poland #galicia

Dennis Triglia
 

I've posted a birth record from Rudnik nad Sanem, Poland (hand-written in Cyrillic in 1868) for which I need a translation, especially the names of parents and exact date of birth but any pertinent data is appreciated as well. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...


Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much for your time and best wishes,
Dennis


Zehavit Schwartz

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to make contact with family of Zehavit, a great-granddaughter
of Pinchas Zelig HaKohen Schwartz, born in Dragamerfalva in 1901 and
perished in Auschwitz in 1944, Moreh Zedek Apahida. She was known to
live in Beit Shemesh on Rechov Ein Gedi when she posted a Yad VaShem
Page of Testimony


Re: Professional genealogist? (Russia to London migration in early 19th century)

Shelley Mitchell
 

Can you share the names of your family members?
--
Shelley Mitchell 
NYC
searching KONIGSBERG/KINIGSBERG, TERNER, MOLDAUER, SCHONFELD - Kolomyya PLATZ - DELATYN. All Galicia. 


Re: out going passenger list Phil. to Palestine

Barbara Zimmer
 

Do you mean he left from Philadelphia about 1900?
When you say you have a photo of him at the port of LA — what port are you referring to? Los Angeles?

Barbara Zimmer
Virginia


My great great grandfather left Phil, I think and went to live in Israel around a couple of years after 1900. I have a pic of him in LA maybe 1930. Are there any lists of people traveling to Israel? The pic I have of him in LA is at the harbor. I tried looking for arrival into LA, with no luck. Louis Littman Gold, of course he could have been listed by another name. He was married but he said other wise. His wife Rebecca and children were in Phil. He was born about 1840. He died in in Israel and is buried on the Mt of Olives. This pic is Louis, daughter Sara and my grandmother Kate Schlissel Keys. Thank you all. Gayle


Re: REPLY button

Marvin Lauwasser
 

I did log on to JewishGen but still saw no reply button.  Then I futzed around, officially (re)joining the discussion group and then wandering thru my account demographics and gave up in frustration.  Subsequently went back to a daily summary message and amazingly, there was a reply button!!  Now it shows up every time I click on a subject, regardless whether I'm logged in.   I wish I could reproduce the path for you that brought me success but I can't. 

BUT....just now i brought up the website.  I'm not logged in  Displayed though are 4 login IDs.  I had previously logged in using my researcher #.  There were also 2 old email addresses that forwarded emails to my 3rd currently used address.  With the account activity of a few days ago, i seem to recall adding the new address.  Of the 4 login IDs available to login, that is the only one to show "groups.jewishgen.org".  The older 3 show "from this website".

Maybe that's how i did it.  Just sharing.


Trying to get a picture of a gravestone in Shalom Memorial Park Cemetery, Chicago area #usa

Roy Ogus
 

I am trying to find someone who would be willing to visit the Shalom Memorial Park Cemetery, Skokie, in the Chicago area to take a picture of a gravestone of one of my family members.  The exact address of the cemetery is 1700 W. Rand Road, Arlington Heights, IL 60004

I can supply more details of the names of the deceased individuals and the gravestone location if you are able to help me.

I would appreciate hearing from anyone would would be able to do this for me.  I will be glad to reimburse you for any expenses involved.  Please reply to me privately.

Many thanks!

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California
r_ogus@...


Re: Professional genealogist? (Russia to London migration in early 19th century)

rv Kaplan
 

Can you tell us what CMJ stands for please.

Your question is common, as often the census just says Russia, Russian, Russian Poland etc.  Did anyone in the family naturalise (National Archives in London hold the records).  Are there any surviving family marriage documents - ketubot - which would state where in the old country a marriage took place,

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
 

On Fri, 24 Jan 2020 at 14:02, <jamehar@...> wrote:
I’ve been researching a branch of my family for some time and have hit a brick wall.

I know that my ancestors moved from ‘Russia’ to London at some point in the first half of the 1800’s, and have found UK census records confirming our family’s oral history. I’ve also identified that my ancestor sent his children to a school run by the CMJ  in Palestine Place (although the CMJ has not been forthcoming in sharing records - even though I know the folios I want access to).

I’d really like to answer the question of where in 19th-century Russia my ancestors came from and what drove them to move (particularly for my grandfather, who is 86 and has never known this), but I’ve reached a dead end.

Can anyone recommend an expert who might be able to help me?


Re: Two NYC Birth Certificates: One person or two?

bernerfolk
 

Does one have an "S" appended to the certificate number?

Sherri Venditti
The Berkshires, USA


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page

Bruce Drake
 

International Holocaust Remembrance Day is on Monday. There are many gripping accounts of that tragic time contained in Yizkor books. I wanted to find an excerpt for this week that captured those memories in a special way. There is perhaps no more eloquent expression of grief and pain and anger than what people say when they are facing death in days or hours. Such last words were written by Jews on the walls of the Great Synagogue in Kovel (Ukraine), where they had been rounded up and taken to await extermination. They wrote with pencils, pens or whatever other implements they could find. Shlomo Perlmutter, who visited the synagogue after the war, was struck by one note whose writer “had obviously spent much effort to do it with his finger nails in the hard wall… There were dried blood stains near the writing.”

The notes which follow Perlmutter’s account speak for themselves.

I have excerpted the notes and rearranged the order in which they were transcribed in the Kovel Yizkor book. 

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2777130875642383?__tn__=K-R


Bruce Drake

Silver Spring, MD


Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK

Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel