Date   

photos of the business of my paternal grandparents - Clichy la Garenne

Lemberski Evelyne
 

Photos of the business of my paternal grandparents - Clichy la Garenne 

 Ladies and gentlemen,

I am looking for photos of the business of my paternal grandparents (Reizea GURFINCHELI AND CHUMA LEMBERSKI) dating from 1933 to 1950 which was a kosher and normal grocery store. It was located at 38 rue de Paris in Clichy la Garenne.

If not please do you know a place where I can find these photos?

Thanking you very much for your help,



Evelyne LEMBERSKI
evelynelemberski@...
saint Maurice
France


Hans (Harry) Loew (1915-1999) born in Kaiserslautern, emigrated in 1938 to New York and passed away in 1999 in San Juan, Puerto Rico #germany

GIDON LEV
 

I am looking for people who know anything about Hans Loew, born on June 3, 1915 in Kaiserslautern, son of Hugo and Tony Loew-Mandel. In 1938 all of them were living in Ludwigshafen am Rhein. Hans emigrated to New York in 1938 while his parents dind't survive the Holocaust. Hans stated his grandaunt Caxline (Caroline?) Mayer as contact person in the USA while arriving in New York. He later changed his first name to Harry. He died on December 22, 1999 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Gidon Lev
Israel


Re: NYC (Esp. Brooklyn) Property Records

Bob Friedman
 

https://rerecord.library.columbia.edu/index.php

The Real Estate Record is a weekly report of building activity in New York City and its environs. This website contains fully digitized volumes, ranging from Volume 1 (published in 1868) to Volume 110 (published in 1922).  The Real Estate Record provides sales, mortgage, conveyance, and other data about buildings in and around New York City.
  • If you are looking for information about a particular topic or address, try Find by Keyword.
  • If you know a particular volume or issue, use Browse by volume & issue.
  • For search combinations such as date or section, use Advanced Search
-----
Bob Friedman
Brooklyn, NY


Translation of Handwritten German Text needed #translations #Minden Germany

Elizabeth Jackson
 

Hello,
In my continued efforts to research my INGBERG family history, I am asking for help in translating the attached handwritten documents.  I would like a complete translation, but any help will be most appreciated.
These are in reference to my Ingberg family (from Warsaw Poland) who resided in Minden Germany.
Thank you!
Elizabeth Jackson, Michigan USA
Researching:  INGBERG, KLEPFISZ, GOLDFLAM, RUDA, MANDEL


Re: General question about Relations for our Town

Tony Hausner
 

Thanks for a very helpful response


Re: Motchi married Heshi...so who's Heshi #lithuania

sharon yampell
 

Heshi may have actually been Chashe if you are using the scenario that Motchi was a male relative….

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, NJ USA

GenealogicalGenie@...

 

From: David Gordon
Sent: Saturday, February 15, 2020 9:16 AM
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Motchi married Heshi...so who's Heshi #givenname #lithuania #names

 

I posted recently asking for help with the name Motchi; many thanks to everyone who responded both publicly and privately.  Everyone agreed that Motchi is Mordechai (or a related name).  Which means Motchi is a man.  And which presents our next problem.  Both my cousin and I have oral stories (from completely separate sources) in which Motchi is married to Heshi.  We had previously both operated on the assumption that Heshi was short for Hirsh/Girsh and that Motchi must be a woman.  However, with this new complete agreement that Motchi is a man, that puts us back a step with regard to Heshi.  I have once again consulted all the sources I can find and come up with little certainty.  What is Heshi likely to be a "nickname" for if Heshi is a woman?  Again, thanks very much in advance for everyone's help.

David Gordon

tiganeasca/at/ gmail.com

Evanston, Illinois

Searching: 

GORDON: Butrimantz; Eisiskes, Daukniunai; HORWITZ: Smolevichi, Lapichi;

GEBALOVITCH: Borisov, DRAZIN: Bobruisk; BENENSON: Borisov;

HURWITZ: Gomel

 


Motchi married Heshi...so who's Heshi #lithuania

David Gordon
 

I posted recently asking for help with the name Motchi; many thanks to everyone who responded both publicly and privately.  Everyone agreed that Motchi is Mordechai (or a related name).  Which means Motchi is a man.  And which presents our next problem.  Both my cousin and I have oral stories (from completely separate sources) in which Motchi is married to Heshi.  We had previously both operated on the assumption that Heshi was short for Hirsh/Girsh and that Motchi must be a woman.  However, with this new complete agreement that Motchi is a man, that puts us back a step with regard to Heshi.  I have once again consulted all the sources I can find and come up with little certainty.  What is Heshi likely to be a "nickname" for if Heshi is a woman?  Again, thanks very much in advance for everyone's help.

David Gordon

tiganeasca/at/ gmail.com

Evanston, Illinois

Searching: 

GORDON: Butrimantz; Eisiskes, Daukniunai; HORWITZ: Smolevichi, Lapichi;

GEBALOVITCH: Borisov, DRAZIN: Bobruisk; BENENSON: Borisov;

HURWITZ: Gomel


Re: Was Riga in the Pale of Settlement 1874? #latvia #lithuania

Marion Werle
 

Uh, that would be Vitebsk gubernia - typo or autocorrect.  Sorry about that!



Marion Werle
<canadagenes@...>


Look up in Beider surname book

Shelly Crane
 

Hello, 

does anyone have the Alexander Beider books who can look up a surname?The name is BYMEL. Would love to know what he says.

They lived in modern day Czechoslovakia (UnterJamny)

Thank you!
Shelly Levin
crzprncess@...
Northern California


(US) Museum of Southern Jewish Experience to Open in New Orleans in Fall of 2020

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

The Museum of Southern Jewish Experience will open in New Orleans, Louisiana in the fall of 2020 with over 7,000 artifacts in 9,000 square feet. It will cover the 13 states of the 11 Confederate ones plus Kentucky and Oklahoma.  As Maryland already has a Jewish museum they are not including Maryland.  The Confederate states are: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia.

 

The story of Jews in the South begins in colonial times –Spanish and French colonies not British ones. Jews who moved to the early South from abroad largely found their niche as merchants, having little experience with agriculture.

 

The Museum is looking for broader assistance from the Jewish and non-Jewish community to provide artifacts and stories. According to the executive director of the Museum, Kenneth Hoffman, “While states bordering Louisiana are well represented in the collection, the Carolinas, Eastern Tennessee and Kentucky need beefing up. Hoffman says the museum is also hoping to accrue items from the Civil War and even the Revolutionary War.”

 

Previously and for 26 years the museum operated on the grounds of a reform summer camp in Utica, Mississippi.

 

To read more see:

https://forward.com/culture/439930/americas-only-museum-of-southern-jewish-culture-will-open-in-fall-of-2020

 

To contact the Museum them contact: info@...

 

Their website may be accessed at:  https://msje.org/

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: Given name "Motchi" #lithuania

Rose Blitzstein Elbaum
 

Sounds like a nickname for the man's name Mordechai. Other versions are Motti, Mottel, Mottke.



Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device


-------- Original message --------
From: David Gordon <tiganeasca@...>
Date: 2/11/20 1:52 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Given name "Motchi" #lithuania #names #givenname

For years, I have dutifully included in my family tree an individual with the given name "Motchi."  That was how it was provided to me by a great-aunt, now long dead.  When pushed for more information, either about the name, the person, or the person's history, she knew nothing.  She knew (from stories) only of a given name that sounded like Motchi.  I've never made any headway at all discovering who this person was. 

Recently, I made contact with another family member who also had the name Motchi in his tree, backed by a similar oral tradition.  To make things even more complicated, in my version, the name belonged to a woman.  In his tradition, it was a man's name.  The only thing both traditions agree on is that this person, whoever he or she was, lived in Lithuania in the early to mid-19th century.  Even the last name is uncertain. 

Despite valiant efforts to discover a more "formal" name that this might be a nickname or other version of, we have both come up empty-handed.  Can anyone help us decipher the name?  Or even the right gender?  Thanks in advance.

 

David Gordon
tiganeasca /at/ gmail
Chicago, Illinois (USA)
S
earching: 

GORDON: Butrimonys, Eisiskes, Daukniunai; HORWITZ: Smolevichi, Lapichi
GEBALOVITCH: Borisov; DRAZIN: Bobruisk

BENENSON: Borisov; HURWITZ: Gomel

 

 

 


--


Rose Blitzstein Elbaum
Potomac, MD



Re: (Philippines) Jewish Soldiers Buried Under a Cross Mistake Fixed after 75 Years

Ken A. Drabinsky <kenJDgen@...>
 

Thanks to the Operation Benjamin article (Jan Allen) for this important string of messages. To follow up on Eric Feinstein, I appreciate your links because I have also found a cousin who was killed in action as a French Nationalist in the town of Arthonnay, France. This was the 42nd Infantry Regiment and included a number of Senegalese soldiers. He was initially buried in a soldiers trench near that town in June 1940. His remains were later moved to Necropole nationale La Ferme de Suippes, a military cemetery near Paris.

I googled his name—Moisek Boguslawski—and found a picture in a small church in Arthonnay of a plaque with over 100 soldiers names listed. They were killed in that skirmish (a massacre). I contacted the wonderful photographer of that photo in France who graciously went to the cemetery and recorded all documents including pictures of the cross and accurate birthdate/location. After several attempts to contact the French government departments, changing the headstone appeared to be an impossible task.

I will definitely contact your links (& those of Tom Klein), much appreciated.

--
Ken A. Drabinsky
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
kenjdgen@...

Paternal:
DRABINSKY, ZURAWSKI, JAKUBOWSKI, ZELINSKI, HENIG [Chodecz, Przedecz POLAND]
BOGUSLAWSKI, FRYDLANDER [Chodecz, POLAND; Paris, FRANCE, Auschwitz]
RISEMAN, CUTLER, LURIE [UKR, Malden/Boston, Mass.USA]
ROIZMEN/SEGAL [Havana CUBA]
Maternal:
MINOVITCH, MINOV(W)ITZ, MINEVICH, FRIEDMAN, RAICHMAN,  [Kalinkovichi, Mozyr, Choiniki, Brahin, BELARUS, Lipton, Sk.CAN]


Re: General question about Relations for our Town

sjgwed@...
 

I, too, visited some of my ancestral towns in eastern Galicia, including Zbaraz, in late fall, 2006. By then, the dark years of the Holocaust had come and gone like a giant tsunami, its colossal waves bringing death to millions, wiping out everything, and then receding as if it never happened.

The Jewish cemetery was still shabby and untended, although I have heard that since then, it's been cleaned up, which is good. I commend the efforts of those today who hope to meet with current residents, but I could not look at any old person without thinking... did he/she play a part, or know someone who did? I have also read that the Soviets relocated many people to Zbaraz after the war, so their memories don't go all the way back. 

I was driven, in part, by an online image I had seen of a 10-feet tall cenotaph erected in 1947 "in memory of the terrible destruction which was wrought by the German and Ukraine mass-murdered, in our town of Zbaraz." I assumed that the cenotaph was in Zbaraz, because carved near the top were the words, "Here Lies Soap." Eventually, I found the cenotaph in Beth David Cemetery, in Elmont NY, after I returned to the US. Even so, my visit to Zbaraz was powerful, and sad.

Susan J. Gordon
New York  sjgwed@...      BIALAZURKER, LEMPERT, SCHOENHAUT, GEIST

























































































































































Re: (Netherlands) Passenger List of the Holland America Line 1900-1920 Online on Open Archives

Sheila Toffell
 

I did eventually get a list with info. Best not to try this on an iPad, bc the screen isn't big enough to see it all! Once you have found the name on the list scroll down to the scan image and click on it. Another list pops up with drop down icons for each passenger.


Re: (Philippines) Jewish Soldiers Buried Under a Cross Mistake Fixed after 75 Years

tom
 

the commonwealth war graves commission maintains graves for fallen soldiers of britain and the commonwealth countries (canada, australia, new zealand, india, etc.) all over the world. they replace lost or damaged stones, and have also fixed mistakes, such as jewish service personnel buried with the wrong kind of marker. unfortunately, i know of at least one case where the jewish graves were vandalized in a small military cemetery in the aegean.

if you know the location, you should be able to contact the organization which maintains that cemetery, and hopefully they will cooperate in having the stone changed.

....... tom klein, toronto


Nicole Heymans wrote:

Thank you Jan for your post and the link to the JPOST article about Operation Benjamin. This has given me ideas.

My maternal grandmother's brother was an auxiliary doctor in the German army in WWI and was killed in July 1918 in Northern France and buried there under a cross. The story goes that my ggfather, a very devout Jew, told the family his son had been killed somewhere on the Eastern front and his burial place was unknown. My ggfather had a memorial stone set up on the family grave in Weissensee cemetary, with an epitaph describing his son as an "unerschütterlich treue Deutscher" (an adamantly faithful German) whose heart was in Israel.

Is Operation Benjamin restricted to American soldiers killed in WWII? Does anything similar exist for WWI and for participants in other armies?


Re: (Netherlands) Passenger List of the Holland America Line 1900-1920 Online on Open Archives

Sheila Toffell
 

On Thu, Feb 13, 2020 at 05:05 PM, Jan Meisels Allen wrote:

Open Archives which is a Dutch genealogical website announced they have placed the passenger lists of the Holland-America Line 1900-1920 online.  Go to: https://www.openarch.nl/indexen/27/passagierslijsten-holland-amerika-lijn

Type in the name you are researching in the search box. You may not get the actual manifest but a listing of what is on the manifest. When you click on the manifest a list of passengers names appears. Click on the name you are searching then a new window appears with the source listed a passenger registers.

 

The Holland America Line (HAL) transported about one million Eastern Europeans t America from Rotterdam between 1880 and 1920.  The HAL had offices in Bulgaria, Latvia and Russia where tickets could be purchased for the train to Rotterdam, the boat to America.

 

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

 


 Hi Jan,
Is there an English option in the actual archives site?  Somewhere down the bottom there is a link to the archives site, but before I start with the online translations  megillah I thought I would ask. I found names, clicked on them and got the list, clicked on the name and got the basic info, which is great, but how do I know if a manifest is available?


Newspapers.com Free Access Through Valentines' Day Weekend

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

Newspapsers.com, part of the Ancestry family of companies is offering FREE access on all newspapers through February 17, 2020 p.m. Mountain Time.  Registration is required. No credit card information is required, just name, email address and password. If you are an Ancestry subscriber you can use your Ancestry sign-in on Newspapers.com for this access. Fill in a keyword or name in the search field. If what or whom you are searching appears a new window opens with the links to that article. Click on the newspaper name/link.  When the newspaper article opens, on the top right there is a box “print/save”. You can save it to your computer.

 

To access the free site go to: https://go.newspapers.com/freeaccess

 

Following the free access period you will be able to view newspapers using a paid Newspapers.om subscription.

 

I have no affiliation with Newspapers.com nor Ancestry and am posting this solely for the information of the reader.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: (Philippines) Jewish Soldiers Buried Under a Cross Mistake Fixed after 75 Years

E Feinstein
 

There are other organizations in the world that are changing the monuments of Jewish soldiers that fell in battle.  Believe it or not the Volksbund or German War Graves commission has been active in doing just that.
Here is a link to an article about one such soldier.  The Berlin Football Club Hertha was honoring its football / soccer players that fell in the Great War 1914-1918 when their preliminary field research--before their delegation visited the cemetery in France, they found out that one of their Jewish players Georg Löwenthal, had been buried under a Latin cross instead of the Jewish monument and yes they had it changed!

https://www.moz.de/nachrichten/brandenburg/artikel-ansicht/dg/0/1/1570143/

In France, the Rabbi Emeritus of Bordeaux, Rabbi Claude Maman has been active in the same cause, researching Jewish soldiers buried under crosses and having them replaced by Jewish grave markers.

https://www.chiourim.com/a-la-recherche-des-soldats-juifs-oublies-html/

If anyone is interested in Jewish soldiers they can please contact me.

All the best

Eric FEINSTEIN
New Jersey


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page

Bruce Drake
 

Keila Yevreyski-Kremer is in a suffocating, overcrowded railroad car packed with Jews who are starving and in near-panic as the train heads to Treblinka. She stands up on tip-toe to look out a little narrow window to see the world she would soon have to leave forever. “The earth is covered with a thick layer of snow, shining against the light of the moon. In the wide white field stand little trees, set in rows, standing motionless in the stillness of the evening,” she writes. “The air is pure, transparent. A great wide world is around us; no one can be seen anywhere. And here in the car – what a contrast! Hundreds of people lie tossed about, without air, and are being led to the slaughter. “

“On the Road to Treblinka” is a chapter from the Yizkor book of Goniadz, Poland. It is a wrenching account of that train trip. But some of the doomed decide to try to jump from the train, one crying out: “Let's not lose courage. We'll never be too late for death. Let's go on running; when the train is moving let's jump through the window. I'll jump; who will come with me?”

Kremer was one of those who did: “And by jumping to my death I chanced to remain alive.”



Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK


(Philippines) Jewish Soldiers Buried Under a Cross Mistake Fixed after 75 Years

Joseph Hirschfield
 

This is from the Operation Benjamin website:


"The aim of Operation Benjamin is to locate Jewish personnel at American military cemeteries all over the world who, for various reasons, were buried under markers incorrectly representing their religion and heritage. Our mission is to correct these mistakes and provide, these many decades later, comfort to the families of the fallen. We work quietly and with dignity, without any cost to the families involved." 


Joe Hirschfield
Portage MI  USA
HIRSHFELD, BUXBAUM, LINDENBAUM, KARPEL-Glinyany, Skwarzawa, Selets, Novvy Yarychiv-GALICIA
MINOWITZKI, MINOWICKI, MINOFF-Brest Litovsk, Wysokoe-Litovsk-BELARUS