Date   

Re: Jewish name Dove #names

Peter Cohen
 

As others have said, the name is Dov, frequently Dov Ber. Look for Berko in Russian Revision Lists. In Yiddish, Berel. Americanized to Bernard, Barnet, Barney.


Re: polite, correct word for genealogy purposes? #general

jel
 

Unless it is simply a platonic, roomate or flat sharing relationship, I term the unmarried couples as Domestic Partners. If they're married, I term as Married and have created, in TMG, a special marriage tag to designate their same sex status. What you do depends on the fllexibility of the software you use to enter your genealogy data.
Judith
Smyrna, Delaware


Re: polite, correct word for genealogy purposes? #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

2 males = Husbands
2 females = Wives
As for unmarried heterosexual couple, last time I looked it Partners
--
Shelley Mitchell, NYC    shemit@...
Searching for TERNER, GOLDSCHEIN, KONIGSBERG, SCHONFELD, in Kolomyya; PLATZ, in Delaytn; and TOPF, in Radautz and Kolomea.


US Naturalization Papers from the Supreme Court #usa #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

After 1906, records of naturalizations in federal courts, including the Supreme Ciurt of Washington, DC, should be in USCIS (US Citizenship and Immigration Services) inventory. Also try Familysearch.org.


--
Shelley Mitchell, NYC    shemit@...
Searching for TERNER, GOLDSCHEIN, KONIGSBERG, SCHONFELD, in Kolomyya; PLATZ, in Delaytn; and TOPF, in Radautz and Kolomea.


Re: Fairy Tales my Father Told Me #belarus

Stephen Weinstein
 

Yes.

I had one great-grandfather who was supposedly brought over by HIAS, even though HIAS insists that they didn't bring over anyone in those days, and that they helped immigrants only after (or when) their ship reached the U.S.

I had another great-grandfather who supposedly entered using the name of the person ahead of him on line, after hearing that person be admitted.  The story is that he didn't think he'd be allowed in if he used his real name, so once he repeated the name of the person ahead of him, because he knew that name worked for that person, so it would work for him too.  This is impossible for several reasons.  First, you gave the name you were using (whether it was yours or not) before you knew whether the person ahead of you in line would be admitted or not.  Second, there would be a record of two individuals who arrived on the same day and ship who both used the name that he supposedly used, and I haven't found one.  Third, the decision about who to admit or reject weren't based on their names,; the inspectors didn't have access to records of their previous times in the U.S. (the supposed reason he feared rejection under his real name).  Finally, the inspector would have been suspicious about hearing the same name twice in a row and checked the manifest to see how many passengers had that name, seen that only one did, and caught him in a lie.

Stephen Weinstein,
Camarillo, CA, USA


Re: polite, correct word for genealogy purposes? #general

Stephen Weinstein
 

Since the word partner has appeared in some of the other answers, something to be aware of is that civil unions were called "registered domestic partnerships" in California law, and the two individuals were called "registered domestic partners".  This applied both to same sex relationships and to elderly heterosexuals (opposite sex relationships) who wanted to be treated as married under California law but as single under federal law (typically so that if one of them ever needed to go into a nursing home, they would not need to spend down the assets of the other in order to qualify for medicaid).  So if you use the word "partner", make clear whether you are using it as a generic term or that you are using it to say that the relationship was a union that was legally registered in California.  Keep in mind that it's not enough for YOU to know what you mean; you also have to make it clear in your notes and tree to anyone who might use your notes or tree for their own research after you're dead; we've all experienced reading something that was clear to whomever wrote it in the 1800s, but isn't clear to us now.

"Fiances" if they are engaged but not married.

"Husband" for any married male and "wife" for any married female.

If they are not married and are not engaged, and you are brave, then boyfriends for (A) and boyfriend and girlfriend for (C).  However, the meaning of girlfriends would not be clear if used for (B) because "girlfriends" in the plural form or a same-sex context normally implies a platonic friendship.  (Unlike "boyfriend", which normally implies a romantic relationship regardless of whether used in a same-sex or opposite-sex context, as does "girlfriend" in a clearly opposite-sex context.  An exception is that I have heard Suze Orman's address callers to her financial advice show as "boyfriend" or "girlfriend".)  Also, it invites an argument about whether boyfriends and girlfriends should be included at all, so if you want to avoid that discussion, it may be better to avoid words that clearly indicate unmarried.

A, B, or C)
"Partners" works for any relationship.  It's simple.  Unlike husband, wife, boyfriend, or girlfriend, it doesn't indicate gender or marital status, so you don't get into a fight with anyone about the validity of a marriage.  It can be safely used around children without concern as to whether they are ready to learn about sex or relationships, because if they don't already know, then they'll just assume you are talking about business partners.  The only problem, as I mentioned at the start, is the possible confusion with the more specific California term.

Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA


Re: Fairy Tales my Father Told Me #belarus

Lee Hover
 

I was told that my GF, Jacob Messing, was a nihilist and left Warsaw after a Cossack cat o' nine tails blinded him in one eye.  About a year after arriving here, his wife, Zipporah (Sophie) arrived w/ my infant father, Herman.  About 6 weeks later, he took them on a picnic to Central Park.  He excused himself to get a drink of water and shot himself to death.  As to the nihilist story, I have no idea as to any truth in it.  The suicide itself is documented on his death certificate and I have newspaper articles about it.  Also in the mix: "he married beneath himself (!)", they never married.  I found his tombstone, which said brother, but no mention of wife.  Since everyone is long gone, I'll never know.

Lee MESSING Hover
Lacey, WA

 LAP(P)IN Lithuania; KLEIN Hungary; MESSING Warsaw, Ger, Poland; ALTSCHULER ALTSZULER Warsaw


Re: New Ukraine records #ukraine #russia

Emily Garber
 

Alizah:

These records, of course, will be a huge help to anyone doing research in the records of the Ukrainian portion of the former Russian and Austrian Empires. We are all looking forward to seeing them. But, unless you have some idea of the town your people came from in the old country, trying to find records for your family will be like looking for needles in the proverbial hay stack (Weinstein is not exactly a rare surname).

It will be several years before these records are online and, most importantly, indexed. Better to spend your time researching through the records in the country to which your ancestors immigrated. US records should provide evidence of where your relatives were from originally. It may also provide information on other family members' names and places of origin (they may not all be the same). You will need as much information as possible to be able to recognize the correct people in old country records once they become available.

The borders of today's Ukraine includes land that was once in several different Empires at different times. If your people were from the Austrian province of Galicia, you will find that many record images are already available online via JRI-Poland and the Polish archives. Some record images from towns in today's Ukraine are already available on FamilySearch and are currently being indexed. As some people have noted, some Russian Empire records are available now (thanks to Alex Krakovsky's work), but they have not been fully indexed.

If you are not experienced with family history research, I suggest you sign up for a JewishGen online course <https://www.jewishgen.org/Education/>. That will provide the skills you will need to carry out preliminary research and get ready for the promised records from Ukrainian archives.

Good luck with your research!

Emily Garber
Phoenix, AZ


Re: Help locating town from Poznan area census #translation #poland

Ellen Caplan
 

Hello Moses,
You asked for assistance in finding the towns mentioned in a German census card.

It looks to me like the first (and third) name is Karlsruhe, Germany, also spelled Carlsruhe in the JewishGen Town Finder. It is in SW Germany, in Baden-Wurtemberg, near the French-German boarder.

The other town looks to me like Milituh, but I cannot find any place with that spelling.

Ellen Caplan
Ottawa, Canada
Researching:
EISENBERG, NAGLER, GINIGER, KLINGER: Mielnica & Ustye Biscupie, Galicia
BREGER, LIEBMAN: Gomel/Homel & area, Belarus
SOLOMON, PARADISGARTEN: Tukums & Mitau, Latvia
--
Ellen Caplan
Ottawa, Canada
Researching: EISENBERG, NAGLER, GINIGER, KLINGER (Mielnica, Ustye Biscupie & Zalescie, Galicia); BREGER (Gomel, Belarus; Novozybkov, Russia), LIEBMAN/LEBMAN (Gomel, Belarus); SOLOMON, PARADISGARTEN (Tukums & Mitau, Latvia)


Re: Y DNA question #dna

Vivs
 

Hello

  Autosomal DNA is the way to go in this case.  You inherit 50% from
mom and 50% from dad.   You will match people on both sides. Jewish
autosomal DNA tends to be fairly challenging.  But top matches down to
about 2nd cousin level should still all be fairly accurate.  Beyond that
it gets very challenging to work with.

If you want to explore deep ancestry, YDNA can be helpful, but you would
need a male direct line descendant of your father's line. If he had no
daughters, you could look to his brothers, or their sons.  Or his
father's brothers and their sons, etc.

If you wish to explore YDNA, there are 2 free webinars by UGA that I am
teaching. One was the end of last month, and should be posted any day
and be free for a week, the 2nd is the 4th Tue this month and is free
live (and hopefully for a week after it is posted. )

  I admin a Jewish YDNA haplogroup project. If you wish more help in
that arena feel free to ask questions!

Vivs Laliberte



--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Fairy Tales my Father Told Me (Gottfried) #general

Judy Floam
 

Just as a point of interest, someone I knew in high school had the last name ‘Godfrey’ and the story was that it had  been changed from ‘Gottfried’.


Re: "Mother" (But Not "Husband") On a Married Woman's Grave #general

Meron Lavie
 

Hi Rhonda,

I can't believe I actually wrote "beloved husband". Of course I meant "beloved wife".

The husband in question was very much alive. He subsequently married another woman and then deserted her when she fell ill. His brother had a similar track record. They were my paternal grandfather's first cousins, and he hid their very existence from my father and aunt - apparently with very good reason...

Meron LAVIE


Re: Can someone please translate this tombstone from Hebrew to English? #translation

dasw5@...
 

Translation of word after woman

a Woman of Importance (chashuvah)


Re: polite, correct word for genealogy purposes? #general

Robert Hanna
 

 

Trudy Barch asks:

 

What is the correct term nowadays for…

A)     2 males living together as an unmarried couple?   Married couple?

B)     2 females as an unmarried couple?     Married couple?

C)    Male and female as an unmarried couple?

 

 

I would call them, respectively:
 
A) partners (unmarried men)  and  husbands (married men)
 
B) partners (unmarried women)  and  wives (married women)
 
C) partners (unmarried opposite gender)
 
Others may feel differently.
 
Robert Hanna
NYC
 
Researching:  Chanan, Blumenblat, Karasik, Thomashow, Cohen, Rubinstein, Bunderoff, Pastilnik, Nemoyten, Diskin, and variations of all.

 


An Old Song - Possibly Russian, possibly Yiddish #general

de.cantor@...
 

I have a very old and distant memory of my grandfather singing a song with a title that sounded like Toni Godl.  The o in Toni is short and I have failed to find any reference.

He was allegedly from Kiev, Ukraine

This has been nagging away for ages, can anyone enlighten me?

Thanks


Re: US Naturalization Papers from the Supreme Court #usa #general

Marian
 

Okay I don't know why I didn't find this when I looked before, but it would appear the records are at NARA in DC, included within RG 21.  From their catalog (ONLY items that would cover 1922):

NAID 7691865  - “Naturalization Certificate stub index” dating 1906-1926
 
NAID 7692316 - Declarations of Intention to become US citizens 1818-1926
 
NAID 6051624 - Naturalization petitions, 1906-1926
 
NAID 6051621 - Military Petitions for Naturalization, 1918-1924
 
NAID 6051623 - Military naturalization stubs, 1918-1924


Family Legends (Was Re: Fairy Tales my Father Told Me) #general

Shlomo Katz
 

There is a legend in my family, which I first heard from a distant cousin when I was in my 40s, that our ancestors fled Galicia for Maramures (then, Hungary; now Romania) because their non-Jewish maid tipped them off that there was a plot to murder them or involve them in a blood libel. The implication was that the family was wealthy; why else would the gentiles care to bother them?

My 3x great-grandfather, who was the ancestor who made the journey, is listed on his death record in Felsoviso, Hungary (Viseul de Sus, Romania) as having been born in Nadworna, Galicia in 1828. I have searched the available Nadworna Cadastral maps and not found any hint that my ancestors owned land there. Not a proof that the story is false, but makes me wonder. Then again, maybe he made up being born in Nadworna.

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, MD


Re: polite, correct word for genealogy purposes? #general

Alyssa Freeman
 

As far as I know, a couple is a couple, regardless of the genders involved. People sometimes talk about same-sex couples/marriage, but they're still a couple.
 
Alyssa Freeman
Richmond, VA


Re: Fairy Tales my Father Told Me #belarus

erikagottfried53@...
 

I think a kinder (and actually more accurate) way of describing these stories is "family legends" or "family stories".  My sense is that a good many of these stories aren't made up from a whole cloth and will often contain a kernel of truth.  Here's my family legend:  The first Gottfried that came to Hungary (where my father’s family is from) was from Germany—a Catholic priest who got mixed up with the Reformation and then had to run for his life.  Somewhere between Germany and Hungary he fell in love with a Jewish woman and converted to Judaism. (That’s a lot of religions in one lifetime.)  And since that time all Gottfrieds in Central and Eastern Europe are Jewish.  My grandfather told my father this story. I asked my father if he thought it was true and he said, “I don’t know; but I do  know that your grandfather didn't have enough imagination to make it up." Of course, that hardly rules out earlier ancestors making up the story and passing it down to my grandfather.  And I've also heard that apocryphal stories of a gentile connection are quite common (not sure why).  Still ... while I know that there are gentile Gottfrieds from Central and Eastern Europe, nearly all Gottfrieds that I’ve encountered (via records and documents and in person) from that part of the world are in fact Jewish.  Even those who aren’t Jewish often turn out to be converts to Christianity.  So perhaps there’s a kernel of truth in this story there somewhere. It's been a goal of mine ever since I heard the story, at age 8 or 9, to see if I can track down the kernel--kind of my "white whale" you might say.  In my imagination I refer to this supposed ancestor as "The Priest."                                                                                                                                                                                            Erika Gottfried -  Teaneck, New Jersey


Re: Szasz family from Hungary #hungary

Margarita Lacko
 

Just for the record, the name of the book is "Wine and Thorns in Tokay Valley: Jewish Life in Hungary; The History of Abaújszántó" by Zahava Száz Stessel.

 

Most of my BLAU family is mentioned in this book. A treasure for me!

 

Margarita Lackó

genealogy: © mishpologia@...

 

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of paveanyu@...
Sent: Sunday, 07 June, 2020 6:56 AM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Szasz family from Hungary #hungary

 

I wonder, are you looking for the 'Szasz family--Zahava Szasz-----  famous book 'Thorns in the Tokaj Valley?--From Abaujszanto Hungary?

She lives in New York and her sister is in Israel

Zahava --I had the honour to meet her personally --is an exceptionally fine, superb Lady--her books are 'treasured'--

She/her family lived in the same street in Abaujszanto -Hungary--as my Grandparents---Biederman ( Grunwald)

Best wishes to you and to Everybody at JewishGen.

Veronika Pachtinger---paveanyu@...