Date   

JGSLA: "Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind" Jan. 22 with Sarah Wildman #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to our
upcoming program about love lost...and found...after WWII.

"Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind"
with author, Sarah Wildman

Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 8:00PM
Skirball Cultural Center
2701 N Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Embark on a profoundly personal journey with Sarah Wildman as she
discusses her acclaimed new memoir, described as "intimate and
mesmerizing" by Publisher's Weekly: an exploration into family
identity, myth, and memory. Part detective story, part love story,
"Paper Love" recounts the author's hunt for the lost love her
grandfather left behind when he fled pre-World War II Europe.
Obsessed, Wildman began a quest that lasted years and spanned
continents.

Years after her grandfather's death, journalist Sarah Wildman stumbled
upon a cache of his letters in a file labeled "Correspondence:
Patients A-G." What she found inside weren't dry medical histories;
instead what was written opened a path into the destroyed world that
was her family's prewar Vienna. One woman's letters stood out: those
from Valy--Valerie Scheftel. Her grandfather's lover who had remained
behind when he fled Europe six months after the Nazis annexed Austria.
Obsessed with Valy's story, Wildman began a quest that lasted years
and spanned continents. She discovered, to her shock, an entire world
of other people searching for the same woman. On in the course of
discovering Valy's ultimate fate, she was forced to reexamine the
story of her grandfather's triumphant escape and how this history fit
within her own life and in the process, she rescues a life seemingly
lost to history. For her research, Wildman was the first journalist
allowed to enter the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen,
Germany, formerly the last major unopened Holocaust archives in the
world.

Book sale and signing after the presentation. Watch a BBC short video
introducing the book on our home page: http://www.jgsla.org (scroll
down)

Reservations recommended. Each JGSLA or Skirball Center member gets
two free tickets, $8.00 per guest. Open to the public. Co-sponsored by
the Skirball Cultural Center. More info:
http://www.skirball.org/programs/readings-talks/wildman-paper-love.

Plan on coming early to enjoy a light dinner >from the Skirball food
cart or BYO. The JGSLA Traveling LIbrary will be available starting
at 7:15PM. The Museum is open on Thursdays. Check the website for
gallery information: www.skirball.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair , Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles
pweisberger@gmail.com


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech JGSLA: "Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind" Jan. 22 with Sarah Wildman #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to our
upcoming program about love lost...and found...after WWII.

"Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind"
with author, Sarah Wildman

Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 8:00PM
Skirball Cultural Center
2701 N Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Embark on a profoundly personal journey with Sarah Wildman as she
discusses her acclaimed new memoir, described as "intimate and
mesmerizing" by Publisher's Weekly: an exploration into family
identity, myth, and memory. Part detective story, part love story,
"Paper Love" recounts the author's hunt for the lost love her
grandfather left behind when he fled pre-World War II Europe.
Obsessed, Wildman began a quest that lasted years and spanned
continents.

Years after her grandfather's death, journalist Sarah Wildman stumbled
upon a cache of his letters in a file labeled "Correspondence:
Patients A-G." What she found inside weren't dry medical histories;
instead what was written opened a path into the destroyed world that
was her family's prewar Vienna. One woman's letters stood out: those
from Valy--Valerie Scheftel. Her grandfather's lover who had remained
behind when he fled Europe six months after the Nazis annexed Austria.
Obsessed with Valy's story, Wildman began a quest that lasted years
and spanned continents. She discovered, to her shock, an entire world
of other people searching for the same woman. On in the course of
discovering Valy's ultimate fate, she was forced to reexamine the
story of her grandfather's triumphant escape and how this history fit
within her own life and in the process, she rescues a life seemingly
lost to history. For her research, Wildman was the first journalist
allowed to enter the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen,
Germany, formerly the last major unopened Holocaust archives in the
world.

Book sale and signing after the presentation. Watch a BBC short video
introducing the book on our home page: http://www.jgsla.org (scroll
down)

Reservations recommended. Each JGSLA or Skirball Center member gets
two free tickets, $8.00 per guest. Open to the public. Co-sponsored by
the Skirball Cultural Center. More info:
http://www.skirball.org/programs/readings-talks/wildman-paper-love.

Plan on coming early to enjoy a light dinner >from the Skirball food
cart or BYO. The JGSLA Traveling LIbrary will be available starting
at 7:15PM. The Museum is open on Thursdays. Check the website for
gallery information: www.skirball.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair , Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles
pweisberger@gmail.com


Re: LDS Microfilm Help in Former Hungary #hungary

Bob Lenk
 

The 1828 census is described quite well at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/Census1828.htm

It is a census of individuals owning taxable property - which means it
does not include all households. The only personal information listed is:

1) the name of the head of the household
2) a count of people in each household, including servants, between the
ages of 18 and 60, of either sex and whether married or not,
contributing to the financial well-being of the household
3) some category describing who the other people are (I have seen
"Subinquilini" (tenant) and "Ancillae" (maid)).

All the other fields have to do with property. This is, unfortunately,
very little of genealogical significance - especially if you already
have the name of the head of household.

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, USA


>amitna87@gmail.com wrote:
>
>I wonder if anyone is working at/has any access to LDS Microfilm
>number 623511, as I can't access it being resided in Israel. The
>record is >from Subotica, Serbia (back then, Szabadka, Bacs-Bodrog),
>>from the Hungary census of 1828. I have an entry number in case it is
>possible to search for it. I don't know what other details are there
>(if any) apart >from the name and address already digitized, but if
>there are any it could be very meaningful for me.
>
>Also, I would like to ask if any of you know - has this specific
>census recorded only household heads or full families? What was the
>criteria for recording a person in such census in the Kingdom of
>Hungary?

tomk@ecologicaltech.com wrote:
i haven't used that particular census before, but the title,
"vagyonossziras" translates as "wealth register", so it seems to only
list owners (i.e. heads of the household). but for what it's worth,
the small test that i did, showed a couple of men, and one listing
for a widow.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: LDS Microfilm Help in Former Hungary #hungary

Bob Lenk
 

The 1828 census is described quite well at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/Census1828.htm

It is a census of individuals owning taxable property - which means it
does not include all households. The only personal information listed is:

1) the name of the head of the household
2) a count of people in each household, including servants, between the
ages of 18 and 60, of either sex and whether married or not,
contributing to the financial well-being of the household
3) some category describing who the other people are (I have seen
"Subinquilini" (tenant) and "Ancillae" (maid)).

All the other fields have to do with property. This is, unfortunately,
very little of genealogical significance - especially if you already
have the name of the head of household.

Bob Lenk
Greeley, Colorado, USA


>amitna87@gmail.com wrote:
>
>I wonder if anyone is working at/has any access to LDS Microfilm
>number 623511, as I can't access it being resided in Israel. The
>record is >from Subotica, Serbia (back then, Szabadka, Bacs-Bodrog),
>>from the Hungary census of 1828. I have an entry number in case it is
>possible to search for it. I don't know what other details are there
>(if any) apart >from the name and address already digitized, but if
>there are any it could be very meaningful for me.
>
>Also, I would like to ask if any of you know - has this specific
>census recorded only household heads or full families? What was the
>criteria for recording a person in such census in the Kingdom of
>Hungary?

tomk@ecologicaltech.com wrote:
i haven't used that particular census before, but the title,
"vagyonossziras" translates as "wealth register", so it seems to only
list owners (i.e. heads of the household). but for what it's worth,
the small test that i did, showed a couple of men, and one listing
for a widow.


Access to LDS Microfilm in Israel #hungary

adler.motti@...
 

Dear All,
As mentioned yestersay, there is an acute problem that in one of the
world's main concentrations of Jewish people, there is no access to
LDS files. I have contacted The National Library of Israel in
Jerusalem and Bet Ariella in the past about hosting a center, but
nothing came out of it.

Please contact me "off-list" if you would be interested in LDS access
here in Israel.

Mordechai Adler
Petach Tikva

Researching: Adler, Popovo (Czonka-Papi), Slovakia (now part of
Ukraine); Weisz, Mezokaszony (Koson), Slovakia (now part of Ukraine);
Szender, Debrecen/HajduDorog, Hungary and afterwards Jerusalem,
Israel; Kunstlinger, Brzesko (Brigel), Galicia (now part of Poland);
Wasserzug, Warsaw, Poland; Oppenheim, Bielsk Podlaski, Poland


Hungary SIG #Hungary Access to LDS Microfilm in Israel #hungary

adler.motti@...
 

Dear All,
As mentioned yestersay, there is an acute problem that in one of the
world's main concentrations of Jewish people, there is no access to
LDS files. I have contacted The National Library of Israel in
Jerusalem and Bet Ariella in the past about hosting a center, but
nothing came out of it.

Please contact me "off-list" if you would be interested in LDS access
here in Israel.

Mordechai Adler
Petach Tikva

Researching: Adler, Popovo (Czonka-Papi), Slovakia (now part of
Ukraine); Weisz, Mezokaszony (Koson), Slovakia (now part of Ukraine);
Szender, Debrecen/HajduDorog, Hungary and afterwards Jerusalem,
Israel; Kunstlinger, Brzesko (Brigel), Galicia (now part of Poland);
Wasserzug, Warsaw, Poland; Oppenheim, Bielsk Podlaski, Poland


JGSLA: "Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind" Jan. 22 with Sarah Wildman #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to our upcoming
program about love lost...and found...after WWII.

"Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind"
with author, Sarah Wildman

Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 8:00PM
Skirball Cultural Center
2701 N Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Embark on a profoundly personal journey with Sarah Wildman as she
discusses her acclaimed new memoir, described as "intimate and
mesmerizing" by Publisher's Weekly: an exploration into family
identity, myth, and memory. Part detective story, part love story,
"Paper Love" recounts the author's hunt for the lost love her
grandfather left behind when he fled pre-World War II Europe.
Obsessed, Wildman began a quest that lasted years and spanned
continents.

Years after her grandfather's death, journalist Sarah Wildman stumbled
upon a cache of his letters in a file labeled "Correspondence:
Patients A-G." What she found inside weren't dry medical histories;
instead what was written opened a path into the destroyed world that
was her family's prewar Vienna. One woman's letters stood out: those
from Valy--Valerie Scheftel. Her grandfather's lover who had remained
behind when he fled Europe six months after the Nazis annexed Austria.
Obsessed with Valy's story, Wildman began a quest that lasted years
and spanned continents. She discovered, to her shock, an entire world
of other people searching for the same woman. On in the course of
discovering Valy's ultimate fate, she was forced to reexamine the
story of her grandfather's triumphant escape and how this history fit
within her own life and in the process, she rescues a life seemingly
lost to history. For her research, Wildman was the first journalist
allowed to enter the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen,
Germany, formerly the last major unopened Holocaust archives in the
world.

Book sale and signing after the presentation. Watch a BBC short video
introducing the book on our home page: http://www.jgsla.org (scroll
down)

Reservations recommended. Each JGSLA or Skirball Center member gets
two free tickets, $8.00 per guest. Open to the public. Co-sponsored by
the Skirball Cultural Center. More info:
http://www.skirball.org/programs/readings-talks/wildman-paper-love.

Plan on coming early to enjoy a light dinner >from the Skirball food
cart or BYO. The JGSLA Traveling LIbrary will be available starting
at 7:15PM. The Museum is open on Thursdays. Check the website for
gallery information: www.skirball.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair , Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA: "Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind" Jan. 22 with Sarah Wildman #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles invites you to our upcoming
program about love lost...and found...after WWII.

"Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind"
with author, Sarah Wildman

Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 8:00PM
Skirball Cultural Center
2701 N Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Embark on a profoundly personal journey with Sarah Wildman as she
discusses her acclaimed new memoir, described as "intimate and
mesmerizing" by Publisher's Weekly: an exploration into family
identity, myth, and memory. Part detective story, part love story,
"Paper Love" recounts the author's hunt for the lost love her
grandfather left behind when he fled pre-World War II Europe.
Obsessed, Wildman began a quest that lasted years and spanned
continents.

Years after her grandfather's death, journalist Sarah Wildman stumbled
upon a cache of his letters in a file labeled "Correspondence:
Patients A-G." What she found inside weren't dry medical histories;
instead what was written opened a path into the destroyed world that
was her family's prewar Vienna. One woman's letters stood out: those
from Valy--Valerie Scheftel. Her grandfather's lover who had remained
behind when he fled Europe six months after the Nazis annexed Austria.
Obsessed with Valy's story, Wildman began a quest that lasted years
and spanned continents. She discovered, to her shock, an entire world
of other people searching for the same woman. On in the course of
discovering Valy's ultimate fate, she was forced to reexamine the
story of her grandfather's triumphant escape and how this history fit
within her own life and in the process, she rescues a life seemingly
lost to history. For her research, Wildman was the first journalist
allowed to enter the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen,
Germany, formerly the last major unopened Holocaust archives in the
world.

Book sale and signing after the presentation. Watch a BBC short video
introducing the book on our home page: http://www.jgsla.org (scroll
down)

Reservations recommended. Each JGSLA or Skirball Center member gets
two free tickets, $8.00 per guest. Open to the public. Co-sponsored by
the Skirball Cultural Center. More info:
http://www.skirball.org/programs/readings-talks/wildman-paper-love.

Plan on coming early to enjoy a light dinner >from the Skirball food
cart or BYO. The JGSLA Traveling LIbrary will be available starting
at 7:15PM. The Museum is open on Thursdays. Check the website for
gallery information: www.skirball.org

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair , Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles
pweisberger@gmail.com


JGS Toronto Meeting Sunday, January 25, 2015 - "Making History Accessible: Illustrating and Publishing your Family Story" #general

Valerie Fox
 

JGS of Toronto

Date: Sunday, January 25th, 2015

Time: 10:30 a.m. ( Doors open at 10:00 a.m.)

Place: Temple Sinai
210 Wilson Avenue
Toronto, Ontario

Topic: Making History Accessible: Illustrating and Publishing Your Family
Story
This presentation will show you: some of the reasons for, and methods of
"publishing" (meaning sharing your story with others, effective page layout
design guidelines, and methods for illustrating your family history to help
bring the story to life.

Presenter: Gregg Loane
He has been working on his children's family tree for over 20 years. He
has recently completed a Second Edition of his family history that was 19
years in the making. His immediate and extended family are spread far and
wide, and so publishing an sharing this history has been a priority >from the
beginning.

Refreshments will be served.

$5.00 for non-members.

For further information about this program go to: www.jgstoronto.ca or
info@jgstoronto.ca. or telephone 647-247-6414.

Valerie Miller Fox
Mentoring Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Toronto Meeting Sunday, January 25, 2015 - "Making History Accessible: Illustrating and Publishing your Family Story" #general

Valerie Fox
 

JGS of Toronto

Date: Sunday, January 25th, 2015

Time: 10:30 a.m. ( Doors open at 10:00 a.m.)

Place: Temple Sinai
210 Wilson Avenue
Toronto, Ontario

Topic: Making History Accessible: Illustrating and Publishing Your Family
Story
This presentation will show you: some of the reasons for, and methods of
"publishing" (meaning sharing your story with others, effective page layout
design guidelines, and methods for illustrating your family history to help
bring the story to life.

Presenter: Gregg Loane
He has been working on his children's family tree for over 20 years. He
has recently completed a Second Edition of his family history that was 19
years in the making. His immediate and extended family are spread far and
wide, and so publishing an sharing this history has been a priority >from the
beginning.

Refreshments will be served.

$5.00 for non-members.

For further information about this program go to: www.jgstoronto.ca or
info@jgstoronto.ca. or telephone 647-247-6414.

Valerie Miller Fox
Mentoring Coordinator


International Holocaust Memorial Day--January 27, 2015 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

January 27 is International Holocaust Memorial Day as declared by the United
Nations. The United Nations and the European Union commemorate the same
anniversary with an event called International Holocaust Remembrance Day. It
started in 2005 when the United Nations marked the 60th anniversary of the
end of the Holocaust. The UN Resolution urges every member nation of the
U.N. to honor the memory of Holocaust victims. To help prevent future acts
of genocide, the resolution encourages the development of educational
programs about Holocaust history. The resolution further rejects any denial
of the Holocaust as an event.

January 27, 2015 is the 70th anniversary of Auschwitz-Birkenau, being
liberated by Soviet troops. Today, many governments have legislated January
27 as an annual Holocaust Memorial Day to mark the date as an international
day of commemoration to honor the victims of the Holocaust. The theme for
the 2015 International Holocaust Memorial Day is Keep the Memory Alive.

Some countries memorialize the Holocaust on other days, for example, Yom
Hashoah in Israel and in the United States is commemorated on the 27th day
of Nisan, the day of the Warsaw Uprising. In Hebrew, Holocaust Remembrance
Day is called Yom Hashoah. In 2015 Yom Hashoah is observed on April 16.

In commemoration of International Holocaust Memorial Day, the United States
Holocaust Memorial Museum produced a 38-minute film which is an overview of
the Holocaust to provoke reflection and discussion about the role of
everyday people, institutions, and nations between 1918 and 1945. To watch
the film go to:
http://www.ushmm.org/learn/introduction-to-the-holocaust/path-to-nazi-genocide.
The film is available in all UN official languages. In addition to
English, you can watch the film online in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian,
and Spanish. For more information go to: http://tinyurl.com/m7hgay3
Original url:
http://www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/special-focus/international-holocaust-remembrance-day

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen International Holocaust Memorial Day--January 27, 2015 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

January 27 is International Holocaust Memorial Day as declared by the United
Nations. The United Nations and the European Union commemorate the same
anniversary with an event called International Holocaust Remembrance Day. It
started in 2005 when the United Nations marked the 60th anniversary of the
end of the Holocaust. The UN Resolution urges every member nation of the
U.N. to honor the memory of Holocaust victims. To help prevent future acts
of genocide, the resolution encourages the development of educational
programs about Holocaust history. The resolution further rejects any denial
of the Holocaust as an event.

January 27, 2015 is the 70th anniversary of Auschwitz-Birkenau, being
liberated by Soviet troops. Today, many governments have legislated January
27 as an annual Holocaust Memorial Day to mark the date as an international
day of commemoration to honor the victims of the Holocaust. The theme for
the 2015 International Holocaust Memorial Day is Keep the Memory Alive.

Some countries memorialize the Holocaust on other days, for example, Yom
Hashoah in Israel and in the United States is commemorated on the 27th day
of Nisan, the day of the Warsaw Uprising. In Hebrew, Holocaust Remembrance
Day is called Yom Hashoah. In 2015 Yom Hashoah is observed on April 16.

In commemoration of International Holocaust Memorial Day, the United States
Holocaust Memorial Museum produced a 38-minute film which is an overview of
the Holocaust to provoke reflection and discussion about the role of
everyday people, institutions, and nations between 1918 and 1945. To watch
the film go to:
http://www.ushmm.org/learn/introduction-to-the-holocaust/path-to-nazi-genocide.
The film is available in all UN official languages. In addition to
English, you can watch the film online in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian,
and Spanish. For more information go to: http://tinyurl.com/m7hgay3
Original url:
http://www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/special-focus/international-holocaust-remembrance-day

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


ViewMate 37533 and 37535 translation request of two similar birth records - Polish #general

Michael Herzlich
 

I've posted two vital records for the births of Jente and Samuel Leon in
Bilina Wielka (near Sambor) on viewmate. The record for Jente appears as
entry 233 on the page. Samuel Leon is entry 122 on his page. The language
is most likely Polish based upon the dates of entry, but I am not sure.
Requesting translation of the columns for these two records which should
be similar as the parents are the same. The records appear to have been
updated in 1935, perhaps to reflect a civil marriage.

Surnames I see in the image are HERZLICH, TREIBER, KAMERMAN and GRAD

Responses can be directly added to the viewmate or reply to mherzlich@yahoo.com
The direct link for the viewmate images are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37533

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37535

Thank you,
Michael Herzlich


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate 37533 and 37535 translation request of two similar birth records - Polish #general

Michael Herzlich
 

I've posted two vital records for the births of Jente and Samuel Leon in
Bilina Wielka (near Sambor) on viewmate. The record for Jente appears as
entry 233 on the page. Samuel Leon is entry 122 on his page. The language
is most likely Polish based upon the dates of entry, but I am not sure.
Requesting translation of the columns for these two records which should
be similar as the parents are the same. The records appear to have been
updated in 1935, perhaps to reflect a civil marriage.

Surnames I see in the image are HERZLICH, TREIBER, KAMERMAN and GRAD

Responses can be directly added to the viewmate or reply to mherzlich@yahoo.com
The direct link for the viewmate images are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37533

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37535

Thank you,
Michael Herzlich


ViewMate Translation Request - Polish, For Hersch HASS #galicia

Alan Seid
 

Hi,

This is a birth record for Hersch HASS born 12 Sep 1905 in Nadworna.
Please help with providing a word-for-word translation >from Polish to
English for columns 10, 11, and 12. Please also provide the Polish text.

I've posted the images on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=37536

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you

Alan Seid


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia ViewMate Translation Request - Polish, For Hersch HASS #galicia

Alan Seid
 

Hi,

This is a birth record for Hersch HASS born 12 Sep 1905 in Nadworna.
Please help with providing a word-for-word translation >from Polish to
English for columns 10, 11, and 12. Please also provide the Polish text.

I've posted the images on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=37536

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you

Alan Seid


ViewMate Translation Request - German, For Dwora HASS #galicia

Alan Seid
 

Hi,

This is a birth record for Dwora HASS born 01 Jun 1893 in Nadworna.
Please help with providing a word for word translation >from German to
English. Please also provide the German text. I only need the column 7.

I've posted the images on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=37507

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you

Alan Seid


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia ViewMate Translation Request - German, For Dwora HASS #galicia

Alan Seid
 

Hi,

This is a birth record for Dwora HASS born 01 Jun 1893 in Nadworna.
Please help with providing a word for word translation >from German to
English. Please also provide the German text. I only need the column 7.

I've posted the images on ViewMate at the following address

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=37507

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you

Alan Seid


Re: Back dating recording in 1883 for births occuring 1848-1863? #galicia

Mark Jacobson
 

Dave,

This is actually a common situation for towns in Galicia. Many Jews in
Galicia did not have civil marriages (especially before 1900), and when
they did it was often later in life. The 1883 civil marriage registration
is not back dated, it is when it actually occurred. There was a religious
marriage years before, but that was not accepted as legal by the
Austrian authorities - the civil marriage had to occur with the
government recognized Rabbi and be recorded in the register. The
civil marriage would trigger a legitimization of all children previously
born to the couple, regardless of their current age. In many towns the
clerks would go back to old birth records and mark the children
legitimate. They would also create records for children who were born,
or died, often many years previously but were never registered. This
process to make the children legitimate through civil marriage allowed
the children to use their father's surname in legal situations like for
travel documents or business and to seek higher education.

Mark Jacobson
Past President, JGSPBCI
Boca Raton, FL

DOGULOV/DOVGALEVSKY - Belaya Tserkov/Kiev Ukraine;
COHEN/KANA/KAHAN - Tripolye, Ukraine;
JACOBSON - Polotsk/Lepel, Belarus; KOBLENTZ - Polotsk, Belarus;
KAMERMAN/KAMMERMANN, WEGNER - Drohobycz, Galicia;
KOPPEL - Stebnik/Drohobycz, Galicia;
JACOBI - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia; ROTHLEIN - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia;
TUCHFELD - Rzeszow/Stryj/Lvov, Galicia; GOLDSTEIN - Ranizow, Galicia

Dave Lewak <dave@krozeja.net> wrote:

... I'm trying to make sense of some odd records found for my
great-great-grandfather's, Simcha Winzelberg's, family, who lived in
Czchow near Brzesko in the 1800s. It looks like the records were made
in 1883, for births that occurred much earlier....

... I also have a marriage record for Kalman Winzelberg and Mindl
Silberstein, dated in 1883, where their ages are listed as 58 and 56,
respectively. This also looks like a back dating recording....

... Why were the birth dates recorded 20 years or later, all at once?
Why was the marriage of Kalman and Mindl recorded at the same time?....

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Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Back dating recording in 1883 for births occuring 1848-1863? #galicia

Mark Jacobson
 

Dave,

This is actually a common situation for towns in Galicia. Many Jews in
Galicia did not have civil marriages (especially before 1900), and when
they did it was often later in life. The 1883 civil marriage registration
is not back dated, it is when it actually occurred. There was a religious
marriage years before, but that was not accepted as legal by the
Austrian authorities - the civil marriage had to occur with the
government recognized Rabbi and be recorded in the register. The
civil marriage would trigger a legitimization of all children previously
born to the couple, regardless of their current age. In many towns the
clerks would go back to old birth records and mark the children
legitimate. They would also create records for children who were born,
or died, often many years previously but were never registered. This
process to make the children legitimate through civil marriage allowed
the children to use their father's surname in legal situations like for
travel documents or business and to seek higher education.

Mark Jacobson
Past President, JGSPBCI
Boca Raton, FL

DOGULOV/DOVGALEVSKY - Belaya Tserkov/Kiev Ukraine;
COHEN/KANA/KAHAN - Tripolye, Ukraine;
JACOBSON - Polotsk/Lepel, Belarus; KOBLENTZ - Polotsk, Belarus;
KAMERMAN/KAMMERMANN, WEGNER - Drohobycz, Galicia;
KOPPEL - Stebnik/Drohobycz, Galicia;
JACOBI - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia; ROTHLEIN - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia;
TUCHFELD - Rzeszow/Stryj/Lvov, Galicia; GOLDSTEIN - Ranizow, Galicia

Dave Lewak <dave@krozeja.net> wrote:

... I'm trying to make sense of some odd records found for my
great-great-grandfather's, Simcha Winzelberg's, family, who lived in
Czchow near Brzesko in the 1800s. It looks like the records were made
in 1883, for births that occurred much earlier....

... I also have a marriage record for Kalman Winzelberg and Mindl
Silberstein, dated in 1883, where their ages are listed as 58 and 56,
respectively. This also looks like a back dating recording....

... Why were the birth dates recorded 20 years or later, all at once?
Why was the marriage of Kalman and Mindl recorded at the same time?....

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