Date   

Re: Archives of Ukraine records #ukraine

Chuck Weinstein
 

The sheer number of Russian language documents being posted on Alex Krakovski's Ukraine wiki will take several years to index and transcribe, based on the number of volunteers Ukraine Research Division has that can do the work.  While we are experimenting with an Artificial Intelligence (AI) solution, we are not satisfied yet that it can do the job.  If you can help, please let us know.  

Chuck Weinstein
Towns Director, JewishGen Ukraine Research Division
chuck1@...


Re: Yiddish or Hebrew name for IDA #belarus #names

marlenedunham@...
 

My great grandmother's name was Rose/Rozie/Rosia.  I had never heard the name Ida until I saw her tombstone which read Ida Rose.

Marlene Dunham
Researching:
Halper, Galper, Odessa, Kherson, Ukraine
Bernstein - Lomza Poland
Garfinkle - Austria
Kanowitz - Poland


Re: When was this picture taken? #photographs #germany

Sally Bruckheimer
 

1890s. Leg o' Mutton sleeves


Translation needed - Russian #russia #translation

lfrydl@...
 

Hello: Would someone be able to translate this Census for me?  At least the names in the first column?  Thank you! Linda M.


Seeking information on a village named Horodok, Vilna #lithuania

bgreenfield7@...
 

My family came from Horodok, Vilna Gubernya.  It is near Minsk and this letter is from Jewish Members who live in Minsk and  who are trying to gather information for a Museum.

I think this should be posted on the Discussion Group but I don’t know how to do it.

 

Bette Greenfield  

 

 

 

 

Dear Bette Greenfield,

               We are volunteers-local historians group. We look forward to your help in collecting information about the former village Horodok.

Historical information:  -since the second half of the NINETEENTH century Horodok belonged to the Vileika County Vilnius province;

-from 1921 to 1939 this village was part of Poland;
-since September 20, 1944 – in the Molodechno region, and from January 1960 – Molodechno district, Minsk region.

               Our immediate plans are to continue studying local history through the history of individual families whose roots go back to the Horodok.

                We will be grateful for any materials: photos and films, memories, documents, correspondence, your stories about family members, etc. We are ready to use materials in Russian, Belarusian, Polish, English, Yiddish, Hebrew and other languages. The information you provide will be used to prepare local history publications on the site of the Horodok (http://horodok.by/) in the mass media, creating a full and multi-faceted chronicle of the town, perpetuating the memory of those who died during the Second World War, forming a culture of memory for new generations.

               The history of the country is formed from the stories of individual families.     Therefore, it is very important for us to establish the history of people who are connected with the history of the town of Gorodok.

The past is the starting point for the future, so the goal of our work is to create a cultural and historical area "Museum of the Jewish, Belarusian, Polish, Tatar community" on the basis of the SEI "Gorodok educational and pedagogical complex kindergarten-basic school of the Molodechno district".

This platform will become a place for collecting not only information, but also a place for communication and dialogue of cultures. That is why we, the older generation, should be interested in history, to tell, teach, and discuss important milestones in the history of the town. After all, the young will soon become the older generation, and it will be their turn to pass the baton.

               We believe very much in what we do.

                Thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Lina Tsivina-moderator of the cultural project: "Horodok and its Jewish history".

Alexey Zhakhovets - creator of the Horodok website.by (site about the Horodok of Molodechno district).

Tatyana Shumel - teacher of history and social studies of the SEI «Horodok educational and pedagogical complex kindergarten-basic school of the Molodechno district».

 

 


Re: Yiddish or Hebrew name for IDA #belarus #names

Mikhoyel Basherives
 

It could be almost anything as people have responded. My grandmother's aunt was Ida in English but her Yiddish name was Hotke/Hotka which is how we call her, which I believe is a diminutive for Hodes (Haddas).


Re: Geography mystery: Did any part of Polish Russia became German between 1880 and 1900? Specifically where? #poland #germany

adrian.707@btinternet.com
 

I believe the area west of Poznan was Germany for a while. In that area of Europe the borders changed frequently.


Re: Geni and Family Search #general

Max Heffler
 

I enjoy using geni/MyHeritage and Ancestry to bounce back and forth, filling in many records and blanks, but it does consume a significant amount of time. I have over 21500 hints on outstanding on Ancestry. More blanks filled in present more record hints. I have less than 1300 record and tree matches left on MyHeritage.


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Alyssa Freeman via groups.jewishgen.org <tsiporah.shani=gmail.com@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2020 10:59 AM
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Geni and Family Search #general
 
      I take issue with the majority of sources on My Heritage and Geni being from trees. Both sides have Social Security, Census, birth, death, and marriage records and public records, among others. They're not perfect and it's harder to find evidence for ancestors who lived their entire lives outside an English speaking country, but that's where Jewish Gen and Family Search can be helpful.  My main tree is on MH. I don't have record matches for every single person, but I do have them for a lot of them. With Geni, even though Geni is linked to My Heritage, I find a lot of errors, since their goal is to make one giant family tree of the Jewish people and you can edit someone else's tree. However, I've gotten a lot of relatives from other people's trees there that have had record matches come up once I add them to My Heritage. I have found some famous people in my tree - no kings or queens but a couple of artists, musicians, and writers - and I've verified all them. Only one of them had I ever heard of before. Only once did one turn out to be wrong, and it was someone I got from a tree in Geni. 
     My mom uses Ancestry. She finds things that I haven't and I find things that she hasn't and we sometimes correct each other, so I'd say those two are about equal. Family Search tends not to have as many living relatives in their records from foreign countries but they do have records from many other countries - except Israel. My guess as to why is because FS is run by the Mormons.
 
Alyssa Freeman
Henrico, VA
FAVILYUKIS, BOTNIK, DIKERMAN, SUSSMAN, KALLNER, FRIEMAN, FREIMAN, KAPLINSKY, LEVANISKY, GORDON, MARKEL, SHACHAR, SHAPIRO

--

Web sites I manage - Personal home page, Greater Houston Jewish Genealogical Society, Woodside Civic Club, Skala, Ukraine KehilalLink, Joniskelis, Lithuania KehilaLink, and pet volunteer project - Yizkor book project: www.texsys.com/websites.html


tombstone translation #translation

Leya Aronson
 

Hello,
I cannot figure out how to answer the tombstone request by Mary Ellen.
However all the guesses as to what the Bet Shin Tet before the date of death stands for 
BESAIVA TOVA...in old age [literally with good wisdom]
Sorry but I cannot type in Hebrew on this computer.
 
Leya Aronson
Toronto


June 29: Zoom genealogy webinar from Center for Jewish History #events

Moriah Amit
 

Family History Today: Jewish Refugees & the U.S.-Mexico Border
Watch Live on Zoom - Monday, June 29, 6 PM ET


Between the world wars, more than 200,000 Jewish refugees fleeing Europe and the Middle East found a safe haven in Latin America, where immigration restrictions were less stringent and more easily circumvented than in the U.S. and British-controlled Palestine. While some of these refugees permanently settled in Latin America, many more emigrated again, primarily to the U.S. and Israel. In this presentation, Moriah Amit, the Center for Jewish History’s senior genealogy librarian, will explore the lesser-known history of Jewish refugee immigration to the U.S. via Latin America. Additionally, for those whose ancestors came to America through this route, Moriah will explain how to locate records that will shed light on their journey.


Ticket Info: Pay what you wish at jewishrefugees.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom program.

This program is sponsored by the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute; it is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.


Moriah Amit
Center for Jewish History
New York, NY


Re: Archives of Ukraine records #ukraine

darren.lubotsky@...
 

Thanks for posting this. 
My understanding is that not all of these original documents are currently translated and indexed in Jewishgen. Is that correct? 
What would be the best way to have them translated?

Thanks,
Darren Lubotsky


Re: Geni and Family Search #general

Alyssa Freeman
 

      I take issue with the majority of sources on My Heritage and Geni being from trees. Both sides have Social Security, Census, birth, death, and marriage records and public records, among others. They're not perfect and it's harder to find evidence for ancestors who lived their entire lives outside an English speaking country, but that's where Jewish Gen and Family Search can be helpful.  My main tree is on MH. I don't have record matches for every single person, but I do have them for a lot of them. With Geni, even though Geni is linked to My Heritage, I find a lot of errors, since their goal is to make one giant family tree of the Jewish people and you can edit someone else's tree. However, I've gotten a lot of relatives from other people's trees there that have had record matches come up once I add them to My Heritage. I have found some famous people in my tree - no kings or queens but a couple of artists, musicians, and writers - and I've verified all them. Only one of them had I ever heard of before. Only once did one turn out to be wrong, and it was someone I got from a tree in Geni. 
     My mom uses Ancestry. She finds things that I haven't and I find things that she hasn't and we sometimes correct each other, so I'd say those two are about equal. Family Search tends not to have as many living relatives in their records from foreign countries but they do have records from many other countries - except Israel. My guess as to why is because FS is run by the Mormons.
 
Alyssa Freeman
Henrico, VA
FAVILYUKIS, BOTNIK, DIKERMAN, SUSSMAN, KALLNER, FRIEMAN, FREIMAN, KAPLINSKY, LEVANISKY, GORDON, MARKEL, SHACHAR, SHAPIRO


Holocaust Survivors located in Holland #holocaust

Lande
 

The USHMM has linked digitized documents with 24,133 names in the existing collection Dutch Survivor Lists in the Holocaust Survivors and Victims database.  This collection, indexed by Jewishgen volunteers in 2011,  includes a number of lists obtained from the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam.  It consists of lists of survivors located in various parts of Holland.  While most were Dutch, the collection includes a  large numbers of German Jews,  who emigrated to Holland both before and after the war.
 
The names can be searched and viewed in the combined collection, Dutch Survivor Lists (https://www.ushmm.org/online/hsv_view.php?Sourceid=27995) and also under each individual town list.  You may request the associated PDF documents by submitting a request through each name record and receive the document immediately in your email.
 
Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


Re: Tombstone Translation #photographs #translation

fredelfruhman
 

I am standing “on the shoulders” of the above replies in composing my response.

 

Here lies

 

Our dear mother

 

A modest and honest woman

 

Beloved to all those who knew her

 

Mrs. CHANNAH FREEDA/FRAYDA

 

daughter of our teacher the rabbi Yaakov

 

died

 

with a good reputation [on the] 13th of Kislev 5673

 

May her soul be bound up in the bond of life.

 

=========================================================

 

The Hebrew spelling of her middle name (with one ‘Yud’) makes me lean towards the pronunciation “Freeda”; Frayda would more commonly be spelled with two Yuds.  However, either is possible.

 

The abbreviation before her father’s name definitely indicates that he was a rabbi (having rabbinical ordination; not necessarily being a pulpit rabbi).  Occasionally, this abbreviation is included in error.  In this case, with the excellent Hebrew on the stone, I feel that the composers of the text were knowledgeable. 

 

It is common to see the abbreviation Bet-Shin-Tet on a gravestone.  Hebrew abbreviations can have multiple readings; this depends upon the context.  The abbreviation “b’shaah tovah”, which means “in a good time” is used for happy occasions (for example, upon hearing that a woman is expecting, one might say “b’shaah tovah”, in a good time, expressing the wish that baby be born at a favorable hour).  I cannot see anyone feeling that someone had died “at a good time”.  Thus the reading here would be “b’shem tov”, with a good name.  As I mentioned in my earlier reply, gravestones have no punctuation; they are full of run-on sentences, with phrases often being broken up by the engraver according to how they best fit on each line.  The phrase ‘died with a good name on such-and-such a date’ often appears on gravestones, no matter the day of the week upon which the death occurred.

 

==============================================

 

I’d like to repeat what I’ve written several times in the past.  The ViewMate feature of jewishgen is an excellent place to post images of gravestones, which have their own category among the many types of images that can be placed there.  If you want to make readers of the daily digest aware that you have a gravestone to translate, you can simply post that you’ve uploaded a gravestone image, and include the direct link to the ViewMate item.  Replies are automatically sent to the poster.-- 

Fredel Fruhman,  Brooklyn, New York, USA


Re: Geography mystery: Did any part of Polish Russia became German between 1880 and 1900? Specifically where? #poland #germany

avivahpinski@verizon.net
 

Do you have the Polish passport? I would be very surprised to see a
Polish passport issued in 1914. Before the end of WWI, Poland was
divided up between the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the Russian Empire. 
The area around Gdansk/Danzig was under Prussia & Germany.
Poland was not a political entity, as a country, until after the First
World War!

My father's Polish passport, which I have, from 1920, and was issued to
him by the Polish Embassy in Paris, where he was living at the time.

Avivah R. Z. Pinski ,  near Philadelphia, USA


Re: Historic Synagogues of Europe #general #unitedkingdom

Efraim
 

I love to go to and to photograph synagogues in every city I visit. Here is the link to my photo galleries of synagogues of Europe:
Synagogues-of-Europe


When was this picture taken? #photographs #germany

Susan Lubow
 

This picture was taken in Germany, but can anyone identify at least the decade?

 

 

Susan Lubow

Researching: SCHWARZ, HIRSCHINGER, AMSEL

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Tombstone Translation #photographs #translation

fredelfruhman
 

There are a number of discrepancies among the replies that were given.  I hope to come back with a full reading later.

Meanwhile, I would like to point out:

1.  Her middle name might have been pronounced Freeda, rather than Fraydah.

2.  There is an abbreviation in front of her father's name that indicates that he was a rabbi, as at least one person pointed out.

3.  As to the abbreviation immediately preceding the date of death:  Gravestones have no punctuation and are full of run-on sentences.  This abbreviation -- despite its location -- means "with a good name/reputation".  It does not mean "at a good time",  even if the date of death might have been a Sabbath. 
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


Re: Yiddish or Hebrew name for IDA #belarus #names

susan.wolman
 

Sometimes Chaya becomes Ida.   
Also Ida is sometimes from Eidel - sweet/gentle - in Yiddish
 
Susan WOLMAN 
researching
WOLMAN - Minsk, Minsk, Belarus, Brooklyn, Albany, NY
PALEY - Shatsk, Minsk, Belarus, New York, Albany, NY Sharon, Fairfield, CT
COHEN/KAGAN - Gudel, Lithuania, Corona, NY
POLIANSKY - Lithuania, Camden, NJ, Corona, NY
 


Re: Photographs of Lodz Cemetery #poland

Robert Murowchick
 

Although they are not organized at all, you can find some 560 images of tombstones in the Lodz New Jewish cemetery in this Wikimedia collection
Wikimedia Commons collection of Lodz cemetery photos
The quality of the photos is terrific, but unfortunately none of the names have been transcribed, so there is no way to search the collection. As a crowd-sourced Wiki site, though, users can log in (by setting up a free Wiki account) and can then edit or add to each image's caption, so those of you who are talented transcribers could make a huge contribution here. 

A map and burial lists of the Lodz Ghetto Cemetery can be found at the following link, but there are no photos
http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/ce/ghetto/lodz-ghetto-cemetery.htm
--

Robert Murowchick    <robertmurowchick AT gmail.com>
Needham, Massachusetts USA

Researching these family links:
MUROWCHICK/MURAWCHICK/MURAWCZYK etc (David-Gorodok, Belarus, New Jersey, Chicago)
KUNECK/KONIK/KYONIK (Kozhan-Gorodok, Belarus)
EPSTEIN/EPSTINE (Gavish/Gavieze, Liepaja, Latvia)
SEGAL/SIEGEL (Tilsit, Koenigsburg, Germany; Baltimore; Chicago)