Date   

Whitier Inn-NYC 1930s. More info on Sarah and grandson Tom #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

I am trying to confirm data appearing in someone's autobiography: Was
there a dance hall in NYC in the 1930s called Whitier Inn ?

To add to the data I wrote in my previous post regarding a Sara
ABRAMOWITZ and her grandson Tom: It seems that Tom's parents, Sarah's
daughter and her husband were divorced and Tom lived with his father
in Boston. Tom's mother and grandmother may have lived in the Sea Gate
area and Tom would visit his mother during the summers. Are Coney
Island and Sea Gate close to each other?

TIA

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem
p.s. If the general story sounds familiar to someone but have another
name rather than Tom I'd be happy to check it out.


JewishGen recruiting volunteer systems administrator #announcements

Karen Leon
 

JewishGen is looking to recruit a Systems Administrator volunteer, to be available up to three hours a week, working remotely.

- - Responsibilities include: managing the dozen Windows servers used by JewishGen, applying Windows Updates, updating and configuration of layered software including PHP and WordPress, some database operations for MySQL and SQL Server, research into problems such as undelivered email, failed URLs, and ultimately managing and planning Windows upgrades.

- - Recommended skills include 5 years experience with various windows Server editions, server and software troubleshooting, scripting in both batch and Powershell, and IIS administration. AWS experience a plus as JewishGen moves toward more cloud-centric services.

- - Potential volunteers, please email kleon@...

- - Thank you.

  
 


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Bob Bloomberg
 

It would be naive to think that every ship manifest was clearly readable.  And it would be naive to think that every immigration officer, translator and immigrant spent enough time and cared enough to ensure that every name was written down exactly as it should have been.  There are endless examples of name variations throughout the records, from one census to the next, from one document to the next.  That said, I don't think any names were intentionally changed


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Mikkitobi@...
 

Eva when the immigrants were called forward in turn they showed their landing card which contained their details including name, manifest page and number on page that had been copied from the original manifest on departure.   The entries were then looked up on the appropriate manifest page.  They had to confirm some details on the manifest and proceeded.  It has been estimated that each immigrant might spend just 30 seconds with the clerk.  See https://stevemorse.org/ellis/EllisMythNames.htm

It has been noted elsewhere that if you look at books about immigration published at that time or newspapers at that time (now searchable online) you will find no references to name changes.

So, we have many people repeating this story about name changes but several examples have been checked that show that those immigrants continued to use their original manifest names in subsequent census returns, marriage certificates etc and only later did they start using a different surname. I am not aware of any cases where there is documented proof that a name change took place at Ellis Island.  

Until somebody can show documented proof that this took place the evidence does not support it.  
Please supply proof if you have some. 

There are similar family tales of immigrants arriving in UK ports (Glasgow included) being told they had arrived in the USA and being duped by the crew to leave the ship.  Again there is no proof of these claims and some of the claims are simply not possible.

Michael Tobias
Glasgow, Scotland


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Jules Levin
 

Notice that your story is not about a change wrought by an official; it
was merely personal advice, to be followed, or not, as the arriver
desired.  No one is disputing that such events might have taken place. 
Perhaps the immigration officer [by the way, half the immigration
officers at our southern border have Hispanic surnames] was himself a
landsman advising a new former countryman.

Jules Levin


On 6/26/2020 4:39 AM, David Shapiro wrote:
Perhaps there was a difference between a full name change to a
spelling modification. My cousin arrived in the US in the 1930's from
Germany. His name was SCHULMANN. He told me that the immigration
officer told him that if he wanted he could drop the second 'N', and
that to do so later would be complicated. He agreed, and from then on
his name was SCHULMAN.

David Shapiro
Jerusalem


Re: What "notions" means? #general

Deanna Levinsky
 

Notions used to mean sewing supplies, craft supplies and other small items women used. At that time most clothing was made at home or by a local seamstress so trimmings for a dress or hat or yarn to knit a sweater were bought from a store that sold “notions”
Also there was a notions section in department stores
Deanna Mandel Levinsky 
Long Island New York 
--
Deanna Mandel Levinsky

--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY


Sara (ne ABRAMOWITZ) + grandson Tom b. about 1914 #usa

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Very flimsy data but will try:

Researching a European born (1880s?) New Yorker Sara (maiden name
ABRAMOWITZ who had a grandson Tom who lived and/or studied in a
university in the Boston area.

Some other data possibilities: Sara came with her widowed mother to
New Haven probably around 1880s. Sara may have been married to a Sam
Cohen. They vacationed or lived on Coney Island during the mid 1930s.

Tom was born about 1912-14. His father may not have been Jewish. He
may have lived in the Sea Gate neighborhood in New York during the mid
1930s. He was Sara's grandson through her daughter (name unknown to
me).

There are no official records for the above data and would be very
hard to extract such data with the scant info I have.

Shabbat Shalom

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


1764/1765 Revision lists #lithuania

elani.joseph@...
 

Hi all,
does anyone know where the 1764/1765 revision lists for Lithuania are available. I have seen some online for Sakiai, Yurburg and some others to name a few. I am looking for the Pasvalys revision list from this time. According to Miriam Weiner's Route to roots foundation website if you lookup Pasvalys it says that the 1765 revision list had survived and is listed with all the other Pasvalys revision lists under census . On Jewishgen however it is not there nor is it on Litvaksig . Is there another place where it could be? or is it not translated?


Thanks, Elani L. Joseph


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Jules Levin
 

For the record, there was a medical check as well, and people with
cholera were not admitted.  A significant % of passengers were not
admitted for health reasons, so passenger liners had an incentive to
check for health at ports of entry.  Your dramatic script for the
arrival scene does not comport with the known facts.  Actually, there is
a simpler theory to account for the myth:  the real weak link in the
chain was not the arrival but the departure in Europe.  By the way, all
ships' manifests still exist:  an unreadable entry would not be a
hypothetical, but a matter of record.  To quote Liza Doolittle:  show me!

Jules Levin


On 6/26/2020 6:02 AM, Eva Lawrence wrote:
This idea of a perfect bureaucracy is just not possible. No doubt it
was in the authorities' interests to present a picture of
infallibility, in order to scare people into compliance, but but you
only have to think of a ship full of excitable and exhausted
immigrants, some suffering from cholera, perhaps, many of them filthy
from the long voyage in a crowded steamship belching smoke and reliant
only on sea-water for washing,  to realise that the situation at Ellis
Island can't have been as orderly as some of you imagine it, and that
the well-trained clerks or the people they were interrogating, may
sometimes have suffered from an understandable impatience when the
clerks couldn't read the captain's bad hand-writing on the manifest or
didn't understand a particularly thick local dialect.  The clerks
wanted to get home for their supper, the passengers just wanted to
reach dry land, so shoulders were shrugged and a name change sanctioned..
I'm not saying that name-changes were the rule, or aren't sometimes
just a glib excuse for lack of research, but no-one can be positive
that they couldn't have occurred, whether willingly or unwillingly..
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Re: Name Changes on Passenger Lists #general

Susan&David
 

I made an error in the numbers- 18,000 ships.

Sorry

David

On 6/26/2020 9:37 AM, Susan&David wrote:

As a member of the Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild (ISTG)   https://www.immigrantships.net/
I have seen thousands of ship's passenger list pages.  Check marks, BSI notations, X marks, brief notations of many kinds are ubiquitous.
The ISTG requires a transcription to include every dotted i and every crossed t, with explanations of anything unusual, e.g. a name was spelled one way on the manifest but another way on the Detained Aliens list. 
ISTG members have transcribed more than 180,000  ships, hundreds of thousand of pages.  On their website is a search box.  I entered "Name change" in quotes. and came up with 28 instances.  This one is from one of my own ships, arriving Seattle from Japan in 1941 with Sugihara refugees.  It is the one and only entry in the entire database with a name change notation on the manifest, and it applies to the given name.  There are a small number within the 28 with alternate spellings, probably as clarifications,  but not actual changes. 
Almost all the ISTG transcribers will submit manifests for their own family member's arrival. They add notes to explain name changes within there own family as they took place in subsequent years, never at the time of arrival.       

 

David Rosen
Boston, MA



On 6/25/2020 10:52 PM, Roger Lustig via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
> Check marks were most of what the officials /did/ write on the > manifests, and they're generally quite large. What manifests are you > referring to? > > Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIGoger:  I agree with you. As a mw


What "notions" means? #general

Ilya Zeldes
 

In 1893-1903, in several editions of a City Directory, the occupation of a particular person was listed as "carpenter", then "grocer", and in the last listing "notions". No question about carpenter and grocer, but what the "notions" could mean in the context of occupation?


Name Changes on Passenger Lists #general

Susan&David
 


As a member of the Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild (ISTG)   https://www.immigrantships.net/
I have seen thousands of ship's passenger list pages.  Check marks, BSI notations, X marks, brief notations of many kinds are ubiquitous.
The ISTG requires a transcription to include every dotted i and every crossed t, with explanations of anything unusual, e.g. a name was spelled one way on the manifest but another way on the Detained Aliens list. 
ISTG members have transcribed more than 180,000  ships, hundreds of thousand of pages.  On their website is a search box.  I entered "Name change" in quotes. and came up with 28 instances.  This one is from one of my own ships, arriving Seattle from Japan in 1941 with Sugihara refugees.  It is the one and only entry in the entire database with a name change notation on the manifest, and it applies to the given name.  There are a small number within the 28 with alternate spellings, probably as clarifications,  but not actual changes. 
Almost all the ISTG transcribers will submit manifests for their own family member's arrival. They add notes to explain name changes within there own family as they took place in subsequent years, never at the time of arrival.       

 

David Rosen
Boston, MA



On 6/25/2020 10:52 PM, Roger Lustig via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
> Check marks were most of what the officials /did/ write on the > manifests, and they're generally quite large. What manifests are you > referring to? > > Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIGoger:  I agree with you. As a mw


what is the meaning of given name #poland #names

JOSEPH GODELNIK
 

(for girl in poland)  - Nesseha
--
Jgodelnik


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks

Bruce Drake
 

One of the most powerful Yizkor book passages I have read contains the words of Rabbi Nahum Moshele who spoke to a throng of Jews who were about to be slaughtered In Kovel (Ukraine). What he said was remembered by Ben-Zion Sher in a chapter from the Yizkor book titled “Thus the City was Destroyed.” This excerpt, subtitled “The Vast Slaughter in Brisk Square,” recounts the massacre and how Sher survived it.

Scholars have described what Moshele said as being in the tradition of “Kiddush Hashem” — religious martyrdom in a time of persecution. One writer cited Moshele’s speech in his exploration of how the Jews found the spiritual power to endure their suffering.

In a voice choked with tears, Moshele laments that “our flame is extinguished” and that “No one will come to prostrate themselves on our graves, no one will say Kaddish for us, no one will hold memories of us in his heart.” He says the people have sinned but asks the Lord what sins have been committed by the children and infants “that your wrath be spilled upon them?”

He ends with a confirmation of faith.

““Jews, we are approaching martyrdom. Let us be united as one person. Let us go to our deaths with gladdened hearts. This horrible moment shall pass, and the merciful Lord above us will give our souls repose under His wings.”

I should mention that, after more than 10 years, the Kovel book translation has now been completed.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/3143621722326628?__tn__=K-R

 

Bruce Drake

Silver Spring MD


Re: JewishGen Discussion Group re: KAMINSKY #names

Alan Tapper
 

As for the red hair, king David was a red head and every unit in the Israeli army was supposed to have at least one individual who was a red head , a descendant of Zwingli David


Re: ViewMate translation request - Russian #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

In Russian:

 

In the left corner:

 

Главнокомандующий

военно-морскими силами

Управление кадров

офицерского состава

Отдел 1-ый

22 марта 1946

#11/2203

Москва        175                        268

 

In the center:

 

Центральное бюро учета потерь Красной Армии.

г. Москва, 19, Ул. Фрунзе, 19

 

Копия:  Браво Г. Л.

Уз.ССР, Андижанская Обл.

Станция Грунч-Мазар, до востребования.

 

Препровождая письмо гражданина Браво Г.Л. о розыске Браво Льва Бенциановича, прошу проверить его по вашему учету и ответ сообщить заявительнице.

На учете в управлении кадров Офицерского состава и по учетным данным Центрального Бюро учета потерь Военно-Морских Сил Баво Л. Б. не числится.

Приложение: по тексту только одному адресату

 

Начальник отдела

Полковник  Птахин

Зав. Бюро писем   Коняева

 

Translate into English:

 

In the left corner:

 

 

Commander-in-Chief

naval forces

HR Management

officers

1st Division

March 22, 1946

# 11/2203

Moscow 175 268

 

In the center:

 

The Central Bureau of Accounting for Losses of the Red Army.

Moscow, 19, St. Frunze, 19

 

Copy: Bravo G. L.

Uz.SSR, Andijan Region.

Grunch-Mazar station, on demand.

 

Forwarding a letter from citizen Bravo G.L. about the search for Bravo Lev Bentsianovich, please check it on your account and inform the applicant about the answer.

Registered in the personnel management of the Officers and according to the credentials of the Central Bureau of Accounting for Losses of the Navy, Bavo L. B. is not listed.

Appendix: in the text to only one addressee

 

Head of Department

Colonel                                 Ptahin

Head of Bureau of Letters   Konyaeva


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Eva Lawrence
 

This idea of a perfect bureaucracy is just not possible. No doubt it was in the authorities' interests to present a picture of infallibility, in order to scare people into compliance, but but you only have to think of a ship full of excitable and exhausted immigrants, some suffering from cholera, perhaps, many of them filthy from the long voyage in a crowded steamship belching smoke and reliant only on sea-water for washing,  to realise that the situation at Ellis Island can't have been as orderly as some of you imagine it, and that the well-trained clerks or the people they were interrogating, may sometimes have suffered from an understandable impatience when the clerks couldn't read the captain's bad hand-writing on the manifest or didn't understand a particularly thick local dialect.  The clerks wanted to get home for their supper, the passengers just wanted to reach dry land, so shoulders were shrugged and a name change sanctioned.. 
I'm not saying that name-changes were the rule, or aren't sometimes just a glib excuse for lack of research, but no-one can be positive that they couldn't have occurred, whether willingly or unwillingly.. 
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Re: When was this picture taken? #photographs #germany

Bob Silverstein
 

I did some history, very briefly, and found this and now think the 1890's sounds good.

Ten years after the first International Exposition of Electricity in Paris at the Palais de l'Industrie, Germany was on the leading edge of this new technology. The world's first electric tramway, conceived by Werner von Siemens, was put into service near Berlin in 1881. In 1883, Emil Rathenau founded a company specialized in electrical equipment (light bulbs, flatirons, tea kettles, radiators, refrigerators, etc.), which soon became one of the country's most successful companies. The first electricity company was created in Berlin in 1884 and the first experiment in transporting electricity over a long distance was performed in 1891.   https://www.planete-energies.com/en/medias/saga-energies/history-energy-germany

By the way, Emil Rathenau was Jewish and founded AEG.  Though the company is long gone, the logo still appears on buildings in Berlin.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emil_Rathenau


Re: Geography mystery: Did any part of Polish Russia became German between 1880 and 1900? Specifically where? #poland #germany

Judith Singer
 

In the 18th century, most of our "Russian" Jewish ancestors lived in what is commonly referred to as Poland but was formally known as the Commonwealth of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. This Commonwealth, grown weak for many reasons including internal divisiveness, was split by agreement among the three surrounding empires, Russia, Prussia, and Austria, in a series of three partitions occurring from 1774 to 1795. In the 1795 partition, most of what is now Lithuania became part of the Russian Empire and one area which included Suwalki was allocated to Prussia. It was named "New East Prussia". You can read more about its history in Wikipedia at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_East_Prussia. That article also includes a map of the area.

In the 1807 Treaty of Tilsit, Austria ceded the eastern portion of New East Prussia to Russia, so it was under Austrian rule only for about twelve years. Nevertheless, the self-identification of Jewish residents as Austrian or German remained strong for many decades thereafter. Some of the discussions of Suwalki in JewishGen's Yizkor book for Suwalki refer to this, specifically at www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki/suwe009.html  and www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/suwalki/suw157.html

The members of one branch of my family were originally from this area. On emigrating to the United States, they identified themselves on their ship manifests, censuses, marriage documents, etc. variously as originating in Russia, Poland, Germany, or Lithuania, the changes depending in part on the changing of national boundaries but sometimes for no reason that I have been able to determine. 


Re: Registration towns in Hungary #hungary

Awesome Properties
 

Perhaps same person married two sisters? One sister may have died and her husband married the next sister. I've heard it happening few times. The two names are not the same Czili and Biri