Date   

Re: Institutionalized relative - death date and burial location #general

erikagottfried53@...
 

While looking for information about a troubled relative--I'll call him Max--in my husband's family, I did a broad search this man's first and last name in Ancestry.com and stumbled on an index entry referring to a hearing to commit this man, linked to the original index record.  Max also was committed to Pilgrim State (this was in 1951) and also had lived in the Bronx, as did Ida Levy.  I'm pasting in the Ancestry description of this record below (while redacting the Max's real name).  It appears that Ida Levy also lived in the Bronx.  Perhaps you will have some luck with looking for her in this same database, and should you be lucky enough to find a reference to her there, will be able to follow the reference in the index to the original record(s) of a hearing and related documents--maybe including a record of her death if she died at Pilgrim State.

Good luck with your search.  I hope you'll let this discussion group know if you're successful, and if so, how you were able to prevail. 


Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


[First name, Last name]

 
 
Name: [xxx]
Plaintiff or Defendant: Plaintiff
Date of Action: 26 Sep 1951
Place of Action: Bronx, New York
Other Party: Appt of cmt
Volume Number: 3
Location: The Office of the Bronx County Clerk
Save  Cancel
 



--


Re: "Osterbücher" in 1832 Hessen-Nassau #germany

Deanna Levinsky
 

Concerning children’s books-1744 was the first children’s/picture book 
I was born in the late 1930’s and had plenty of picture and story books 
The depression and war years put a crimp on the availability of books in general and during and right after WWII paper might have been scarce 
That said, books were shared from one family to another
Deanna Levinsky
Long Island, New York
--
Deanna Mandel Levinsky

--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY


Re: Meaning of 'Occupation' in Lodz Ghetto #general #poland

Norma Klein
 

As I know from my late mother, this meant the ‘black shirts’ - auxiliar forces from Lithuania.

Norma


Re: Florence MARMOR burial records of the New York Mokkom Sholom, Bayside and Acacia cemeteries #usa

David Lewin
 

I commiserate and attach the file

David


At 18:54 01/07/2020, Barbara Mannlein wrote:
David,

I am not tech savvy…. and nnow that I am alone there is no one to help me. 


This is the message I get when I tried to download the info via    torrent:

    "  Safari can’t open the file “mokom-sholom-bayside-acacia-burials-florence-marmor-records_202007_archive.torrentâ€� because no available application can open it.   "

Barbara





On Jul 1, 2020, at 10:20 AM, David Lewin < david@...> wrote:

Several people have reported that they had failed to reach the
file. I have therefore again uploaded the 31,891 records of Florence
MARMOR's burial records of the New York Mokkom Sholom, Bayside and
Acacia cemeteries to

https://archive.org/details/mokom-sholom-bayside-acacia-burials-florence-marmor-records_202007

I hope it works this time

David Lewin
London


Fold3 Free Access July 1-15, 2020 #announcements #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

Fold3.com, a member of the Ancestry family of companies, is offering free access to their Revolutionary War records July 1- July 15, 2020 11:59PM ET.  You do have register with your name, email and password.  Go to:  https://go.fold3.com/revolutionary-war

Fill in the name you are searching in the search bar at the top of the page. You can browse without registering, however, if you wish to save, print or download the photo you must register with your name, email address and password.

 

If you try to click on a record without registering you will be invited for the 7-day free trial which is NOT the same as the free access through July 15.  If you try to access the records past the free offer deadline of July 15 you will be invited to subscribe.

 

In the search bar type in the name you are searching.  On the left side of the screen various wars appear with the revolutionary war coming up first click on that and the records with the name you are searching will appear.

If you wish to download or print the image  go to the tool icon in upper right side and follow the instructions. If you wish to save the image right click your mouse on the image and save it to your computer/tablet etc.

 

Records from the Revolutionary War include: Revolutionary War Pensions, Revolutionary War Rolls, Revolutionary War Service Records, revolutionary War Prize Cases-Captured Vessels, and  Revolutionary War Service Records -Navy.

 

I have no affiliation with Fold3 or Ancestry and am posting this solely for the information of the reader.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: Florence MARMOR burial records of the New York Mokkom Sholom, Bayside and Acacia cemeteries #usa

Risa Heywood
 

Thank you for posting this! It seems to be a combination of cemetery info and death certificate info. A record for my 3x great-grandfather, Pesach Novinsky, is in the file with information from his death cert. but there is no burial information such as plot or association. My copy of his death certificate says that he was buried in Bayside. It would be helpful to understand how the file was created and what the sources were? Were the death certificates part of the cemetery records? Do you know what the red text in the file signifies? I understand that you may not have any additional information.
--
Risa Daitzman Heywood
Arizona


Re: Florence MARMOR burial records of the New York Mokkom Sholom, Bayside and Acacia cemeteries #usa

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

David, 

I am not tech savvy…. and now that I am alone there is no one to help me.  


This is the message I get when I tried to download the info via    torrent:

    "  Safari can’t open the file “mokom-sholom-bayside-acacia-burials-florence-marmor-records_202007_archive.torrent” because no available application can open it.   "

Barbara





On Jul 1, 2020, at 10:20 AM, David Lewin <david@...> wrote:

Several people have reported that they had failed to reach the
file. I have therefore again uploaded the 31,891 records of Florence
MARMOR's burial records of the New York Mokkom Sholom, Bayside and
Acacia cemeteries to

https://archive.org/details/mokom-sholom-bayside-acacia-burials-florence-marmor-records_202007

I hope it works this time

David Lewin
London


Re: Searching for my great aunt Rakel GOLUB b.1884 Minsk #belarus #holocaust

David Lewin
 

I am afraid not.   It happened to be one record in nearly 32,000 of burials data in New York

David


At 17:52 01/07/2020, Angela Lehrer wrote:
In order for me to find a connection if it exists with this Rachel GOLUB it would be helpful to find out where in Russia her parents Chaim and Bettie GOLUB they came from. Do you have any further information about them ?

Angela Lehrer
Jerusalem


Re: Meaning of 'Occupation' in Lodz Ghetto #general #poland

aburenbo@...
 

The word 'feuerwehrkommando' is German for Fire Department.


Re: Meaning of 'Occupation' in Lodz Ghetto #general #poland

aburenbo@...
 

From English dictionary. Relative probably worked making clothing.

1.   clipper - an instrument for cutting or trimming small pieces off things.

 

2.

shearer - a workman who uses shears to cut leather or metal or textiles

working man, working person, workingman, workman - an employee who performs manual or industrial labor


Re: "Osterbücher" in 1832 Hessen-Nassau #germany

ELAINE KIRSH
 

I was born in 1944 in NJ to a family that valued education yet I had few books. I understand that this was true for most people. I can’t believe there were children’s books in the 1800’s!
Elaine Kirsh


Florence MARMOR burial records of the New York Mokkom Sholom, Bayside and Acacia cemeteries #usa

David Lewin
 

Several people have reported that they had failed to reach the
file. I have therefore again uploaded the 31,891 records of Florence
MARMOR's burial records of the New York Mokkom Sholom, Bayside and
Acacia cemeteries to

https://archive.org/details/mokom-sholom-bayside-acacia-burials-florence-marmor-records_202007

I hope it works this time

David Lewin
London


More Przemysl and Sieniawa vital record images online. - And now even more good news! #poland #galicia

Stanley Diamond
 

I want to thank Logan Kleinwaks for announcing the availability of additional scans 
of Przemysl and Sieniawa records now online.  In fact, it was one of the items on my
long to do list for today.

I have additional good news for researchers interested in Przemysl and Sieniawa!

JRI-Poland has already extracted these records so you won't need to go through
image by image to locate records for your family.  For details on how to access this
information, write to przemysl@... or sieniawa@...

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.
Executive Director, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.

Logan Kleinwaks wrote:
"More scans of Przemysl Jewish vital records 1790-1933 and Sieniawa Jewish vital records 1869-1912 were recently added to the website of the Przemysl Branch of the Polish State Archives. These are only images, there is no search interface, however some (but not all) of the records are searchable at https://jri-poland.org."



Re: Searching for my great aunt Rakel GOLUB b.1884 Minsk #belarus #holocaust

Angela Lehrer
 

In order for me to find a connection if it exists with this Rachel GOLUB it would be helpful to find out where in Russia her parents Chaim and Bettie GOLUB they came from. Do you have any further information about them ?

Angela Lehrer
Jerusalem


Re: Offer from Boris M in Ukraine to translate Zhitomir documents #ukraine #translation

scottheskes@...
 

I hired Boris recently and found him to be a credible resource who produced tangible results. My interaction with Boris in the past two months has been positive and professional.  He charged for his services by records retrieved and translated.  Payments were made to him through Zelle.  My experience has been good.  


Re: "adoption" to avoid the czar's army #general #lithuania

Emily Garber
 

Ettie, etal.:

The changed-surname-to-avoid-the-Tzar’s-Army story was common among eastern European Jewish immigrants. As with any story heard from our relatives and/or ancestors it’s always important to remember that genealogy/family history is a research discipline. Our job is not to accept the story as told, but to use it as a jumping off point for further research. Does the story make sense in terms of what we know about our family, the time period and place of the activity, and what we have been able to determine through research?

 

From 1804 through 1893, several Russian government edicts were explicit that Jews were to adopt hereditary surnames and keep them in perpetuity – no exceptions, except (sometimes) for those who were baptized and/or in the military. It is clear that many Jews early in the century reacted with indifference to adoption of permanent surnames. The Russians seemed to reissue variations of the edict several times in the 19th century. By the second half of the century these rules were enforced.

 

In terms of historical context of the adoption/conscription story, adoption, as we understand it today, did not exist for Jews in the Russian Empire. Jewish children taken in by others could not be formally adopted and their names, under the vast majority of circumstances, could not be changed from what they had been at birth (see: Paull and Briskman, www.surnamedna.com/?articles=history-adoption-and-regulation-of-jewish-surnames-in-the-russian-empire ).

 

With regard to Jewish attitudes and actions towards conscription, it does depend on the time period. But Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern’s research into archival records [Jews in the Russian Army, 1827-1917 (2009)] shows that by the 1880s Jews responded positively to the draft.

 

All this being noted, I do not doubt that some Russian Jewish people at some times and places tried to find a way around conscription. If the story about adoption/conscription was true, one would expect to see some court records of Jews caught in the act. I hope that those who have the skills to access eastern European archives look for such records. Thus far, I have not seen any reports of them.

 

I have a similar story adoption/conscription story in my family from Volhynia Gubernia. Four brothers. The original name was Utchenik. The others took Garber, Reznick and Lehman (or, more likely, Lederman).  I did not think much of this story until I figured out, via analyses of the paper trail and DNA test results (Y and autosomal), my great grandfather Avraham Abba Garber (born ca. 1864) had a full brother named Levi Yitzkhak Liderman (b. ca. 1850s). (I hasten to add that I have DNA tested two members of an Utchenik family and found no relations thus far.) I reported on this research in Avotaynu 31:2 (Summer 2015). I will also be presenting a live talk in the virtual 2020 IAJGS Conference that includes this case as an example (“Memory and Mystery: Breaking Down Family Lore”). At this point, I cannot say why the name change occurred - only that it did. I resist adopting the explanatory story lest I succumb to confirmation bias.

 

There is no doubt it became more and more difficult for Jewish people to change surnames in the Russian Empire as the 19th century progressed. If we do find a name change, it is critical that we do not jump to explanations that may defy history, context and logic. I implore those who find interesting cases to do the hard work of dis/proving them before adopting what may be apocryphal explanations.

 

Emily Garber

Phoenix, Arizona


Re: "Osterbücher" in 1832 Hessen-Nassau #germany

David Lewin
 

At 15:00 01/07/2020, Michael Rubin via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I have the estate inventory of an ancestor who died in 1832 in a small village in Hessen-Nassau. The inventory lists several obviously Jewish books (eg. "ein Judisches Gesetzbuch").  It also lists "2 Osterbücher."  I know that this term today means springtime children's books and/or secular books somewhat related to Easter themes such as bunnies and generally neutral in terms of religious content.  My question is what this term might have meant in 1832. I have a hard time believing it refers to today's version especially since this person was elderly and children were out of the house.  And, there were only two such books.  There were only one or two of any of the books in the house.
Could Osterbücher have meant haggadah for Passover?  Any other ideas?

Thanks,
Michael Rubin
Boston, MA USA
_._,_._,_




Surely Osterbücher are the Haggdot for Passover?

David Lewin
London



Re: Launch of Online Resource of Jewish Cemeteries in Turkey With Over 61,000 Gravestones #sephardic #announcements

Mikkitobi@...
 

This database is described as the “largest tombstone database in the world“ which is simply not true. 

 


The search interface relegates NAMES to one of the last search parameters and the names do not appear in the results tables!  You cannot see the names unless you click on each individual link. Most of the search parameters are not needed by the vast majority of researchers.

 

They do not offer any kind of soundex, phonetic, fuzzy etc searches – only exact spelling (but I think wildcards work). 

 

 

There appear to be only 353 records in the database, not 61,000 (it IS a beta system).


Hopefully they will enhance and improve this.

 

Michael Tobias
Glasgow, Scotland


Re: Viewmate Translation Request - Russian #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

#5

 

In Rissin:

 

196

 

Состоялось в городе Люблин 30-го мая (11-го июня) 1897 года в 6 часов вечера, явились евреи Берех Тухман, домовладелец, 34-х лет и Шлема Монк, служащий, 57-и лет, жители города Люблин, и объявили, что сего дня, в 5 часов по полудни, в городе Люблин, в доме #638 умерла Райса-Маша Вайсблех, восьми дней от роду, дочь Мордки и Хаи, жителей города Люблин. Настоящим удостоверяю о кончине Райсы-Маши Вайсблех. Сей акт объявляющим прочитан и ими подписан.

Подпись Подпись Подпись Подпись

 

Translate into English:

 

Held in the city of Lublin on May 30 (June 11), 1897 at 6 p.m., Jews Berech Tukhman, a 34-year-old landlord, and Shlema Monk, an employee, 57 years old, residents of the city of Lublin, appeared and announced that today, at 5 o’clock in the afternoon, in the city of Lublin, in house # 638, Rice-Masha Weissblech died, eight days old, the daughter of Mordka and Hai, residents of the city of Lublin. I hereby certify the demise of Rice-Masha Weissblech. This declaration declaring read and signed by them.

Signature Signature Signature Signature


Re: "adoption" to avoid the czar's army #general #lithuania

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

-----Original Message-----
From: חיה שה-לבן שוורץ [mailto:idayosef@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2020 6:10 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: "adoption" to avoid the czar's army

Yes. My late husband's grandfather, whose surname was Cohen was "adopted" by
a widow (his parents were well to do and she was poor) and received the name
Selavan (or Selavoy or Selaveitchik) and the rest of his siblings and
cousins took the name too. When his son made Aliya in 1923 he became a
student in the David Yellin Teachers' School whose principal wanted his
students to have Hebrew names, so he became Yosef Seh-Lavan. It is a unique
surname and as far as I know only his family is Seh-Lavan.
In the US it became Selavan.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz