Date   

Re: Looking for Marczak ancestors from Chotin #bessarabia

hmvangils@...
 

Hello Yefim,
thanks for your reply. 
I found on Czernowitz.geneasearch.net the reference to the Cz marriage record. I never found the original. According to this site David Hersch Marczak was "aus Bojan, Hauseigenthümer Nr. 514, Sohn des Nachman von Chotin in Beßarabien u. der Gitel". That is all I know. 
Do you know whether Nachman is a surname or a given name? And if it's a surname, why has his son an other name (=Marczak)?

I'll take a look at the Family Finder!
Thanks for helping me.

Maaike




Kohn/Kahn Family refugees in USA #hungary

b_nye008@...
 

I am trying to find my great uncle and his family.  They escaped from Hungary and arrived in NY in 1956.  His name was Edward Kohn/Kahn and he came with his wife, son and daughter, whose names I don't know.  He was the youngest brother of my grandfather Herman and his brother Joseph.  My brothers said they lived with us for a short while in Brooklyn, NY, but moved out of NY around a year later.  He was probably born around 1900.
Barbara Kahn Nye


Re: ViewMate translation request - Russian #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

In Russian:

 

#12

Меер Желязо

 

Состоялось в Посаде Янов 6-го мая 1886-го года, в 10 чаов утра явились евреи Меер Файбишман 54-х лет и Лейзер Рубинштейн 34-х лет, проживающие в Посаде Янов и заявили, что 4-го мая текущего года в 8 часов утра умер еврей (не ясно) Меер Желязо, сына Герша-Мошки, 64 лет от роду, проживающего в Посаде Янов и оставил после себя овдевевшую жену (не ясно).  По сему удостоверяю о смерти Меера Желязо.  Акт сей Явившемся прочитан и ими подписан.

Свидетели    Меер Файбишман

                      Лейзер Рубинштейн

Подпись  

 

 

Translate into English:

 

#12

Meer Zhelyazo

 

Held in Posad Yanov on May 6, 1886, at 10 o’clock in the morning, came Jews Meer Faibishman, 54 years old, and Leizer Rubinstein, 34 years old, living in Posad Yanov, arrived and said that on May 4 of this year at 8 o’clock in the morning, a Jew (not clear) Meer Zhelyazo, the son of Gersh-Moshka, 64 years old, who lives in Posad Yanov, died and left behind his stiff wife (not clear). Accordingly, I certify the death of Meyer Zhelyazo. This Appeared Act has been read and signed by them.

Witnesses Meer Faibishman

                 Leiser Rubinstein

Signature


Re: Name Variations #names

Jules Levin
 

My mother born in 1909 in Chicago, 3rd child, parents still did not have
a name ready (?waiting for a relative to die? ;-) ) so she was listed as
Baby Goldstein on the birth certificate.  Some time in the 30's she had
to legally change it to Sylvia, the only name she knew.

Jules Levin


On 7/10/2020 10:03 AM, jbonline1111@... wrote:
Many families changed either the spelling or the entire name to
Americanize it.  My father and his brothers switched from Slonimsky to
Sloan sometime around 1940 or so.  However, one uncle entered the Army
as Slonimsky anyway, while Dad used Sloan.  The other brother spelled
the name Sloane.  I assume they forgot to tell him the spelling.

BTW, there is no need to make a legal name change. Anyone can use
whatever they wish as long as it is not for fraudulent purposes.
Neither Dad nor his brothers ever had a legal name change. For that
reason, when he retired, my aunt had to testify for Social Security
that she knew my father under both names. And it gets more complicated
as his first name on his birth certificate is also not the name he
used.  He didn't know why but in the 1920 census, his first name was
already changed.  We surmised that he may have had the Spanish flu and
that his mother changed his name to fool the angel of death, a
not-uncommon thing.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: Nowe Miasto to Ulanow to Vienna #austria-czech

polishancestry@...
 

Google maps shows a village named Ulanów with a Nowe Miasto about 65 km away. It appears that Nowe Miasto was absorbed into Rzeszów but it still shows up on the map. The other Nowe Miasto villages in Poland are much further away from Ulanów, so this is the most likely choice. This area was part of the Austrian partition of Poland which may have facilitated the family moving to Vienna. FamilySearch.org catalog has one film of Jewish regulations for each Ulanów and Nowe Miasto, but no Jewish metrical records. You might want to check the Polish archives to see if they have any holdings for these villages.


SIG/RD/BOF/RG Application Reminder - 5 days left! #announcements #jgs-iajgs

Nolan Altman
 

Due Date – July 15th!

 

Dear SIG, RD, BOF, RG leader,

As you are probably aware by now, this year’s IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy will be a “Virtual Conference”.  The good news is that the conference Chairs have worked out a mechanism for SIG/RD/BOF/RG groups to meet in virtual meeting rooms during the conference period.  Many of you already submitted applications but some of you notified us that you could not hold a session because you would not be able to travel to San Diego.  Since physical attendance is no longer an issue, we are doing a re-set and providing all groups the opportunity to apply for a meeting session.  Please read the rest of this letter carefully and submit the accompanying application form by July 15th.

The Virtual Conference will take place between Monday, August 10th and Thursday, August 13th between 10:00 AM and 7:30 PM, Eastern Daylight Time. In addition to SIG/RD/BOF/RG meetings, there will be live and pre-recorded sessions. Additional good news for your group is that we would like to offer the SIG/RD/BOF/RG meetings at no charge to attendees, so you could invite existing members and potential members who may not be interested in attending the full conference, but would like to meet with your group.

Attendees for any part of the conference, including the SIG/RD/BOF/RG meetings, must register for the conference.  Registration for the full conference, which will include a variety of live and recorded sessions is $325. (By the way, the $250 early bird rate expires on Sunday, July 5th in case you have not registered and want to.)

By submitting your new request, you are agreeing to the following conditions:

  1. Your meeting cuts off abruptly at one hour, so watching the clock is necessary.
  2. Your meeting will be designed as a simple networking session, not a webinar. However, PowerPoint, screensharing and chat functions are available like in a webinar. You may discuss projects that your group has accomplished or is pursuing, but you agree not to invite a special speaker or present a formal webinar that more properly belongs within the conference to paying attendees.
  3. You will submit the names and contact information for two Moderators who will be responsible for running the technical part of your session with your reply to this letter. If your group is larger than a handful of people, it is in your interest that these people should be different than the person or people who are leading the meeting. We will have a professional technician available to you in the background, but you will need to supply one or two moderators. (It is intended that the moderators will deal with screensharing, taking questions, cueing speakers, etc.  That is why it might be best for the moderator to be someone other than a speaker or leader.)
  4. You will respond to this request ASAP and before July 15th, so the conference organizers have time to schedule the sessions and reach out to your appointed moderators for any necessary training.

Applications MUST be returned by July 15th, 2020 at the to SIGandBOF@...g  (Earlier replies are very much appreciated.)  If we do not get a response by July 15th, your group will not be scheduled.

Feel free to contact me at the same email address with any questions. 

 

Nolan Altman

 


Re: parents as "cousins" on Ancestry.com #dna

sharon yampell
 

When my great aunt and her first cousin wanted to marry, they had to come into New Jersey because it was illegal for first cousins to marry in Philadelphia in the1930’s.

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, NJ USA

GenealogicalGenie@...

 

From: Lee Hover
Sent: Friday, July 10, 2020 1:45 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] parents as "cousins" on Ancestry.com #dna

 

Re my entry above:  Arlene's parents, who were first cousins, lived in New York City.  They also had to go out of state to marry.

 

 


Re: Name Variations (was: "His name was changed at Ellis Island") #names

jbonline1111@...
 

Many families changed either the spelling or the entire name to Americanize it.  My father and his brothers switched from Slonimsky to Sloan sometime around 1940 or so.  However, one uncle entered the Army as Slonimsky anyway, while Dad used Sloan.  The other brother spelled the name Sloane.  I assume they forgot to tell him the spelling. 

BTW, there is no need to make a legal name change. Anyone can use whatever they wish as long as it is not for fraudulent purposes.  Neither Dad nor his brothers ever had a legal name change. For that reason, when he retired, my aunt had to testify for Social Security that she knew my father under both names. And it gets more complicated as his first name on his birth certificate is also not the name he used.  He didn't know why but in the 1920 census, his first name was already changed.  We surmised that he may have had the Spanish flu and that his mother changed his name to fool the angel of death, a not-uncommon thing.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks #poland

Bruce Drake
 

One of the bitterest divisions among the Jews of Eastern Europe — which persists among Jews to this day — was the clash of beliefs between the Hassidim and Zionists. The very religious were concerned that secular nationalism would supplant Jewish faith and they believed that it was forbidden for the Jews to re-constitute Jewish rule in the Land of Israel before the arrival of the Messiah. There are echoes of those beliefs today in the ongoing debate in Israel over whether ultra-Orthodox Jews should be exempt from military service so they could dedicate their lives to study of Torah.
This conflict is brought to life in “The Youth and the Aging,” a section of a chapter titled “Way of Life” from the Yizkor book of Turobin, Poland. The 1917 Balfour Declaration, in which Britain announced support for a "national home for the Jewish people" in Palestine, gave added energy to the Zionist movement. As young pro-Zionists began to organize and establish a Tarbut library, older Jews became incensed. “The aging, who were usually very devout, were not neutral and almost decreed that nobody rent a room to the criminals who were forcing the End of Days and unifying in Zionist groups,” wrote Yaakov Avituv.
Some blamed hardships that befell the town on the Zionist activity. When large swamps formed in early spring after the thaw, a stench rose from them in the days before Passover that kept away the peasants who shopped there and idled the shopkeepers.
“Gentlemen!” declared R' Yerachmiel Bronshpigel at a meeting, “we see clearly that all the troubles have come upon us because of the criminals and the library. It disseminates those books among our sons and daughters, who day and night read what is forbidden and improper. Why are we still silent? We need to begin a holy war.”
The members of the Tarbut persevered and even staged the play “Joseph In Egypt” for Passover and had the tacit support of many common Jews. But pioneers hoping to make Aliyah had trouble finding work or affording the cost of doing so. Avituv laments, “It is possible that many of those who perished in the Holocaust would [have made] aliya had the rich men of the time contributed support.”


Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD


BLUMENTHAL - Minority Census #poland #general

David Selig
 

Hi Jewishgenners

I live in Paris.

Can anyone help with information re
Salomon Blumenthal  ??

Born17.07.1861 inWormditt / Braunsberg (Ostpr.) / Ostpreußen
"Race":JJJJ
Died   31.01.1940

RESIDENCE
17.05.1939
Münchener Str. 37
Schöneberg / Schöneberg
Berlin/

THIS COMES from the Minority Census, and
I do not know where the death information comes from.


Thanks for any help
Best wishes to all

David SELIG
Paris, France


Re: parents as "cousins" on Ancestry.com #dna

Lee Hover
 

Re my entry above:  Arlene's parents, who were first cousins, lived in New York City.  They also had to go out of state to marry.


Re: USA passport research #usa

jbonline1111@...
 

I don't know where to search for passport information, but I have a copy of my great grandfather's passport issued in the mid-1890s in Russia.  For that reason, I think you are correct that he would have needed a passport to enter Russia. On the other hand, 1917 is the year of the Russian revolution, so it's possible that passports were not check as carefully or that there were ways to enter without one. 
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: Brody, Ukraine - seeking a book about Brody #galicia

Bernard Flam
 

Hi from Paris,
To be sure you are aware of all possible books, Brody's Yiskor Bukh has been translated in English and printed by JewishGen YB project in June 2018.
Full title is :" An Eternal Light : Brody, in Memoriam", ISBN 978-1-939561-619; 712 pages.
Khavershaft
Bernard Flam 
Archives & history of Medem Center - Arbeter Ring (Bund) of France
Searching : FLAM around Olesko & Brody, AGID around Lemberg
ZYSMAN & KRONENBERG around Lodz


Re: Settlements in Curaçao and St. Thomas #sephardic

haakonc@...
 

Hello John,
This is indeed very interesting. My great-grandparents, Simon Lazarus Lansburgh and his wife Rebecca lived in Panama City. After he died, Rebecca came to San Francisco with her two young sons. According to family lore, the came with their best friends the Delvalles. The Delvalles are not listed in the passenger list with them ("Passengers Arrived," SF Examiner 31 Dec 1881 pg 3, col 5; Newspapers.com). However, Rebecca apparently came on her own about a year earlier, and stayed in the grand old Arlington Hotel in Santa Barbara, to recuperate from tuberculosis. An article about her imminent return also mentions that "Mr. Mrs. and Miss Del Valle of Panama" were heading directly to Santa Barbara (untitled, Morning Press (Santa Barbara CA), 29 Dec 1881, pg 3, col 3; California Digital Newspaper Collection: cdnc.com).


Re: Origin of the name LAJOUS #france

Bernard Flam
 

Hi from Paris,
According to various French genealogical web sites, "Lajous" is a rare name, only 560 persons born since 1890, mainly in South West counties near Pyrennées mountains and Spanich border.
From "La jus", name given in a mountain village to the house located below the village; as a nickname, applies to the inhabitant of this house.
Khavershaft
Bernard Flam
Archives & History of Medem Center - Arbeter Ring ( Bund) of France


Re: Immigration to US of Avram/Abraham BERCOVICI/BERKOWITZ from #romania

Mike Grossman
 

Thanks for your response, but my question was more about them traveling under the name of GROSSMAN, rather than BERKOWITZ. Under what circumstances would that happen. 
And to make it more confusing, they appear (hard to read) to be going to Philadelphia to "husb Abr Grossman", and not to Peppi's husband Abraham Berkowitz. Any thoughts?


Re: Genealogical research in Argentina #latinamerica

semion@...
 

Here is another helpful site: https://www.hebrewsurnames.com/search
Semion Sucholutsky


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

avivahpinski@verizon.net
 

To Mashiach:  Thank you for correctly summarizing the Ellis Island name
situation in your maingroups note below.   As you noted, if someone did
not want to use their name on the manifest or change their name, they
had the option of putting the name they wanted to be their legal name on
their citizenship papers.  This was a standard procedure and did not
cost anything extra. I am mentoring many refugees who have come into
Philadelphia in the last ten years, and they continue to have name
problems for a variety of reasons, including the fact that many
countries have different naming patterns and alphabets. In many of the
Mideastern and African countries husbands and wives do not have the same
last name and have a number of names. These individuals can make name
changes and choices when they get their citizenship papers.  So things
haven't changed that much!

I grew up in NYC hearing an Ellis Island joke.  I just googled it and
found the story as follows:

https://theconversation.com/jewish-americans-changed-their-names-but-not-at-ellis-island-96152
Awell-worn joke in American Jewish culture
<https://books.google.com/books/about/A_Treasury_of_American_Jewish_Folklore.html?id=pWoaAQAAIAAJ>goes
like this. A Jewish immigrant landed at Ellis Island in New York. The
procedures were confusing, and he was overwhelmed by the commotion. When
one of the officials asked him “What is your name?” he replied, “Shayn
fergessen,” which in Yiddish means “I’ve already forgotten.” The
official then recorded his name as Sean Ferguson.

The web site listed above has a full discussion of the name change
stories at Ellis Island, so I hope that this can put the whole matter to
rest on Maingroups.

Avivah Pinski
near Philadelphia

From: Mashiach L. Bjorklund
<mailto:logictheorist@...?subject=Re:%20%22His%20name%20was%20changed%20at%20Ellis%20Island%22>
Date: Thu, 09 Jul 2020 08:56:58 EDT

Sorry if someone might have alluded to this answer earlier. This is a
long thread and towards the end I just skimmed the posts. As many have
said, names did not change at Castle Garden, Ellis Island, or any of the
many other ports of entry. The name on the manifest is the name they
used - period. So where did the name changes occur? Answer: When they
bought their ticket. Tickets were purchased at ticket offices across the
continent and in the UK. Steamship lines had ticket offices located in
most major cities. At the point they bought their ticket their name had
to be translated/transliterated into the language of the country of
their destination. For the USA that was English. For people from the UK,
Italy, Germany, etc. that translation was minimal if any at all and was
often very similar to their original name. For people from Russia,
Poland, AKA the Pale that meant Cyrillic or Hebrew/Yiddish to English. A
much more difficult translation. To compound the problem many people
were illiterate, so their name was given verbally to the ticket agent.
So how did the ticket agent choose the name they got? Many had postal
directories from New York City, as well as a few other major US cities.
They thumbed through the directories until they found a name they
thought fit the bill. This is often why people like brothers, or other
close family members, ended up in the US with different surnames. They
bought their tickets at different times or different offices or from
different ticket agents. The bottom line is they got their name and then
that name on their ticket had to match the name on the ships manifest in
order for them to board for passage. The manifest was then turned over
to the port of entry (unaltered) on arrival and their name had to match
the manifest in order for them to legally enter the country. Any
discrepancy and back they went, at the steamship companies expense. Now
*after they entered the country and became residents they were free to
change their name again if they so desired. *Many did to Americanize it.
For instance Pinkowitz became Pincourt, Kvint became Quint, etc.. *Many
changed their name upon becoming US citizens. Find their citizenship
documents and you will often find two names. The one they immigrated
with and the one they now choose to be called by which from the point of
citizenship became their legal name.* I hope this clears up some of the
confusion.
--
Avivah R. Z. Pinski ,  near Philadelphia, USA


Re: USA passport research #usa

Molly Staub
 

Hi All, 

My paternal grandfather Einoch Harast arrived in New York (heading to Philadelphia) in 1907. HIAS located him as entering Great Britain in 1917, name now became Emil Harost,  because his father in Russia was dying. I know he wouldn't have needed a passport to come to the U.S., but wouldn't he have needed one to return to Russia? I've looked but can't seem to find one. Any suggestions?

Thanks, Molly Arost Staub

Researching
Harast/Arost,  Shtofman, Berenson, Groffman/Graffman


Re: ancestry look up #general

Lin Herz
 

Dear David,
I found the information you requested and sent it to you. Just wanted others to know so they needn't duplicate. Best of luck with your genealogical research. Stay safe and well.

Sincerely,
Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida