Date   

Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

eksilverman11@...
 

One thing that might help clarify the uncertainly and/or debate around name-changing at Ellis Island are clear, verifiable accounts of the document flows from ticketing agent to ship to Ellis Island (e.g., manifests, who wrote what, what was passed where, etc.) as well as the processing of individuals (and documents) upon arrival at Ellis Island. Should any of you know of verifiable sources and references (published, that stand up to scholarly rigor), please let us know. 

For what it's worth, every name change in my extended family that I've looked at was post-immigration...and, in at least one case, post-service during WWI by Harris Klinowski, born in the US, who became Harry Kline.

Thanks.


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Bob Bloomberg
 

Yale--Thank you.  Well said, well analyzed.  My objection has been to the absolute position (never ever ever happened) of the no name change at Ellis Island advocates.  You have certainly raised enough questions, I hope, that will make them at least take another look


Re: Need a translation #translation

yitschok@...
 

May 8 1960
I wish you luck and blessings, 
And Ratzil's fortune,
And Montefiore's years,
In your memory.
From your grandma Rachel 
Grandma Rose

(This is written in rhymes)


Re: "Jüdische Familien In Kreuznach" #germany

Ernst-Peter Winter
 

...   To my
surprise, however, it took me to the pre-WWI work that Yann
was originally trying to find!
I'm sure that Yann was searching for
Fink, Andrea: Jüdische Familien in Kreuznach : vom 18.
Jahrhundert bis zum Ersten Weltkrieg ; eine Dokumentation. –
Bad Kreuznach, 2001. – 132 pages!

Ernst-Peter (Winter), Münster (Hessen)


Re: SSDI claim dates #general

Robert Hanna
 

Peter Heilbrunn wrote:
[What to Claim dates refer to on SSDI forms and why can they be materially different from the date of death.]
 
I believe that SSDI refers to the date the person started to collect federal disability insurance.
 
Robert Hanna
NYC


Re: Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

Mark Halpern
 

In the Bialystok area, there are many people with surname of Bialostocki (and similar spellings). I would assume that the surname Bialy is a shortening of the Bialostocki surname. 

As for Bialy's. They are definitely not bagels. They were a staple of my and your Bialystok ancestors lives. As Glenda says, the full name of these "rolls" was Bialystoker Kuchen. In the US these days Bialys are sold in many places, but the only ones that look and taste like the originals are at Kossar's Bialys in New York's Lower East Side and other bakeries in New York City. For more about this Bialystok delicacy, read Mimi Sheraton's book "The Bialy Eaters."

BTW, there is one restaurant in Bialystok that sells Bialy's, but they are small rolls with some poppy seeds on top -- tasty, but definitely no comparison to real Bialys. 

Mark Halpern
son of a Bialystoker mother

 

On 2020-07-16 5:02 pm, Glenda Rubin wrote:

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏
 
Glenda [Rubin]
Richmond, CA, USA
 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:
I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak" (onion-bagel"). 




--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Re: MyHeritage Ask The Expert series - Jewish records #announcements

Ellen Barnett Cleary
 

sounds interesting. This link isn’t working for me. 


Recommendations for scanning photos #photographs

loren greenberg
 

Dear All,

I would appreciate your recommendations for high quality photo scanning.
Do you have a favorite smart phone app?
Do you use a physical photo scanner?
I need to produce museum quality scans of my photos.

Thank you in advance,

Loren Greenberg

Volpiansky, Rudstein - Balbieriskis, Kaunas in Lithuania
Shafir, Melamed, Vinograd, Agazin - Starokonstantinov in Ukraine
Milner - Smiltene in Latvia
Abelow - Merkine in Lithuania
Golub(ofsky), Perlow(ofsky) - Vasilishki, Belarus


Who knows Chaim Kushnir from Pavolotsh ? #ukraine

Jana.Tegel@...
 

I am searching for my relatives Kushnir from the Ukraine. My grandmother Basya (Betya) born in 1917, has spoken about her hometown Pavolotsh and sometimes about Polonnoye. Her father's name was Chaim.
Does anybody know something more?

Jana Tegel
Jana.Tegel@...


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

Bob,  You are beating a dead horse.   Names were NOT changed at Ellis Island.   Bureaucrats generate paper  -- that's how the justify their positions...If changes occurred at EI, there would be documentation.... but there is none.

If you go into Starbucks, and the barista writes Bahb on your cup, is there anything obligation on your part to use that as your name from then on?   Of course not.  So, if the  immigrant wais not given a legal binding order saying "This is you name from now on..."    

Barbara Mannlein
Tucson, AZ


Re: Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

Glenda Rubin
 

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏

Glenda [Rubin]
Richmond, CA, USA


On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:
I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak” (onion-bagel”). 


--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Re: Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

Jules Levin
 

Belarus has nothing to do with White Russians in the Revolution. The
Whites were called white to show they were not Reds.  White Russia is
was used for that area to distinguish it from Great Russia and Little
Russia, the latter being Ukaine.  It was called 'white' because it was
in the Baltic region.  The Baltic Sea means white.  Is it confusing?  No
more so than that the red states in the USA are not communists.

Jules Levin


On 7/16/2020 11:44 AM, Sally Bruckheimer via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Bialy means white, like Bialyrus, now Belarus, but they were the White
Russians in the Revolution. Bialys are like bagels with a dent instead
of a hole in the middle, usually with onions or something in the
middle, their origin, I believe, was Bailystok.
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


No More Genealogical Info on Lithuiana Family #lithuania

William Levine
 

Hi, I found the birth entry below  on the Lithuanian data base for an apparent brother of my great-grandfather, Jacob Levin who immigrated to Boston in 1888.  could find no additional records for the entry below on any Jewish Gen Lithuanian data base or on Ancestry data base search, used with the assumption that Beyle below may have immigrated to the U.S  
 
i was hoping that someone could suggest some other research vehicle  to look into for info om Brytlr
 
So michd
LEVIN, Beyle Freyde
 
Efraim, Yakov 
 
Libe, Shmuel 
 
 
3/1/1855
 
25 Tevet 
 
Bagaslaviskis 
 
Vilnius 
 
Vilnius 
 
Father was a shoemaker; maternal grandfather, a potter.
 
Bagaslaviskis 
 
1855 
 
F1 
 
2157999 / 3 
 
 
LVIA/728/1/130 
 


Re: Reading the digest is becoming more difficult.... #general

Adelle Gloger
 

I would whole heartedly agree with him. I, too, have been a very long time reader of the Jewishgen digest, and find that those who submit posts probably need to review the protocol. I would like to add that when asking for a translation, in addition to indicating the language, PLEASE somewhere in your message indicate a surname. That would help determine if that request might be of interest to others interested in that name.
 
Thanks,
Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Cleveland, Ohio USA
 
 
Alberto Guido Chester of Buenos Aires, Argentina posted:
  
Reading the digest is becoming more difficult.... #general
From: Alberto Guido Chester
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2020 18:03:35 EDT
As a long time reader of Jewishgen Digest, I have noticed that due to the increased volume of posts it is becoming more difficult every day to follow the threads.
 
I strongly suggest Jewisgenners to QUOTE part of the post they are answering (or answering privately if the answer is not of help to the community).
 
This has been mentioned a couple of days ago by another long time Jewishgenner, Mr David Lewin of London.
 
Finally, please do not forget to sign with your FULL name and LOCATION as moderators frequently remind us to do.

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina


Re: Lejcek family, Lake Placid #usa

Alexander Sharon
 

There are few folks associated with Lake Placid that are listed in JGFF database.

Look at "search" at:

https://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


SSDI claim dates #general

Peter Heilbrunn
 

What to Claim dates refer to on SSDI forms and why can they be materially different from the date of death.

 

Regards,

 

Peter

 

Peter Heilbrunn

Tel +44 (0)1494 725966

Amersham England

 


Re: Gospitalna Street in Minsk #belarus

Gerald and Margaret
 

Try the Together Plan, a Jewish charity based in Minsk and London:  They will help with all genealogical enquiries 

office@...


Courland Was It Within the Russian Empire but not in the Pale of Settlement #russia

Marilyn Levinson
 

Dear Researchers
I recently discovered ancestors from Courland.  I found an article that said Courland was part of the Russian Empire, but not part of the Pale of Settlement.  However, the article goes on to state that there were Jews living in Courland but Jews in the Pale could not move to Courland.  If this is correct were the lives of Jews in Courland
diffferent from the lives of the Jews of the Pale? Would Alexander I's statute of 1804 include the Jews of Courland, would the May Laws apply to the Jews of Courland?  Thank you for your help.
Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Sobel from Hungary #hungary

Dan Rottenberg
 

More than half a century ago, I was told (how reliably I can't say) that all Hungarian Jews with ancestors named Sobel/Szobel are related. So this is an appeal to everyone in that group.

My g-g-g-grandfather Moses Isaac Sobel (1810?-1862?) raised 10 children in the village of Luko, Saros County (now Lukov,Slovakia), about 9 miles due west of Bartfa (now Bardejov). His wife Rachel Leah Schreiber came from Stropkov in Zemplen County. Until recently, I was missing the name of one of their children. But when the 1857 census came on line about a year ago, I found that missing child: Hersko, born in 1852. Since Moses Isaac Sobel had several other descendants named Herman or some variation born in the mid-1850s, I speculate that Moses Isaac's father may have been named Herman, perhaps died about 1850. If this rings a bell with you, please let me know.

About Hersko Sobel (b. 1850) I know nothing aside from that 1857 census entry plus a hint provided in the memoirs of my great-uncle written in the mid-1950s: He said Moses Isaac Sobel had four sons, of whom one remained in Luko, one went to Romania, and two came to the U.S. Since I'm familiar with the other three brothers, by a process of elimination I've concluded that Hersko must have come to America. But I've yet to find any trace of him in any U.S. records. I've found other Herman Sobels, some of whom are also related to me. For example: Herman Sobel (1857-1942, a son of Israel and Fani Grunberger Sobel), who died in Chicago; and Herman Sobel (c 1841-1940), son of Emanuel Sobel, who also died in Chicago. And I've found Herman Sobels in the U.S. who were born in Russia or Poland.

So please— if you know of anyone named Herman Sobel or some variation of Herman (Hirsch, Zvi, etc.), born c. 1852 and died in the U.S., let me know. I'll be grateful for any lead, no matter how slender.
Dan Rottenberg
Philadelphia PA
dan@... 
     


The ADLER / ORNSTEIN families from Siedlce #general #holocaust #israel

דוד נ.א.
 

I am looking for information about the ADLER / OENSTEIN families, who
lived from Siedlce, Poland between 1900-1942.
David Adler, who was married to Feiga Handel (or Eidel) nee Orenstein,
daughter of Shepsa and Sarah.
Their children: Esther, Moses, Elijah, Chaya, Rachel.

And I am also looking for the people who left pages of testimony at Yad Vashem:
Masha Hershkovitz from Netanya, Israel, Feiga Marcus from Netanya, and
Zvi Tzachanovsky from Haifa.

Thank you
David Nesher
Israel

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