Date   

Re: Research individuals in France #france

royer-mars@...
 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 01:31 PM, Judi Gyory Missel wrote:
Hirschfeld
Hello Judi
The children of the Anton Hirschfeld / Katarina Sessler or Katalina Szessler were also born in Hungary. For those I could check:

Léopold HIRSCHFELD *23/8/1874, Frastack,  naturalisé français Le 22/4/1930
Charles HIRSCHFELD *6/6/1885, Galgocz, naturalisé français le 21/12/1927
Oscar HIRSCHFELD  *16/4/1890, Hlohovec, naturalisé français le 21/12/1927

there is a lot of information on this link
https://gw.geneanet.org/clmarxgmailcom?lang=fr&pz=isabelle&nz=marx&p=anton&n=hirschfeld

Best regards
Yann


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Dahn Cukier
 

My name was changed by the US.

I was born in Israel, 1950. My birth certificate does not have
any information in English, not even my name.

8 months later, my parents took out a US Certificate of Birth,
as US citizens, this confirmed my US status.

The name on the US certificate does not have any Hebrew. My parents
put down the name as translated in the Bible, and my father's family
name as it was while he grew up in NYC.

The name my parents put down was also used when registering me for
school, where I had endless problem in public school. Dan is not
Daniel and דן is not Donald. Had I stayed in the US, I would have
probably changed my name or the spelling. So far I have yet
to find how to spell my name in NYC English so it sounds close to
my given name - my name was given me in Hebrew.

Dani

When you start to read readin,
how do you know the fellow that
wrote the readin,
wrote the readin right?

Festus Hagen
Long Branch Saloon
Dodge City, Kansas
(Gunsmoke)



Records of Home of Old Israel, New York City and 1930 US Census search possible by address? #courland #usa

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear Researchers,
 
Does anyone know whether the records of The Home of Old Israel, 70 Jefferson Street, New York City can be found in an archive?  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_of_Old_Israel regarding the Home.
 
Is there a way to search the 1930 US Census (or any census) by address?
 
Thank you,
Susan Goldsmith
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
jcwsmg@...
 
Researching GOLDSHMIDT, F(P)ILVINSKY, SHLIOMOVICH, GITTES (GADIE,GADYE, GIDUSH, GITES) Seta, Jonava, Kaunas, Adustiskes, Zemaiciu Naumiestes, Keidainiai, Vandziogala, Lithuania
HOROWITZ, DRASNIN (DRASNE) Dauhinava, Belarus; TOBIAS (TOUBES, TOBES, TAUBES) Novyy Swerzhen and Stowbtsy, Belarus; ROZANSKY, BILINSKY, MIRANSKY Iasevichi, Belarus

 



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Re: Research individuals in France #france

Michael Turnbull
 

Did you receive the document I sent you? I am a bit puzzled by Adolf Tarnower's business activities! He was trained as an engineer in France and his wife, Sura/Sara/Alice Rozembee/Rozenberg was probably French (?). So how does someone involved in Construction start dealing in clothes? Was that his wife's business? I am attaching a document from Warsaw that shows him in a business relationship with other people. Where did you find the details of Adolf's daughter?


Does anyone have a premium account in gw.geneanet for a one time only search? #france

Alberto Guido Chester
 

I need to search the quite common surname DUFOUR in France and the only way to identify this person is by adding the wife´s name..
 
This requires a premium account I do not have and I do not think I will ever need again.
 
Gerard or Geraud Dufour born ab. 1830  married to Eveline (also named Jeanne in another document) Dufour born ab. 1840. 
 
Paul Dufour was his elder brother, born about 1828. 
 
The three of them were established in Buenos Aires according to the national census of 1869.
 
My main interest is to know from which city, ville or region of France they originated.
 
Thanks in advance.. 

Alberto Guido Chester
Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
 


Re: Research individuals in France #france

deborah.shindell@...
 

Hi from Connecticut,

Thank you so much for this information. I was able to connect Kalma's descendants in France to the rest of the Beserglik clan in Poland (and all over the world), as Carol married to Liba from my original search request was the Kalma from the naturalization records and was already on my Beserglik family tree with the same date of birth. You were also able to give closure to Michnel's date of death for all the family trees that contained this person but only had his death date as "between 1939-1945".

It was so generous of you to provide this information and give your time to this search.
With much thanks,
Debbie Shindell


Seeking info on ZAICSEK/ZAITCHIK/ZEIDMAN Traveling Circus near Uman, Ukraine, 1880-1900 #ukraine

DALE ZEIDMAN
 

Hi all. I'm trying to prove that members of my family owned or ran a traveling circus in and around Uman, Ukraine, between 1880 and 1900 before emigrating to the U.S. Any information would be welcome. Thanks.
Dale ZEIDMAN
New York


Re: Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

Max Heffler
 

Mark, was their stock of Bialy’s called a Bialystok? Sorry… See you virtually next month…

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of Mark Halpern via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Thursday, July 16, 2020 7:34 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

 

My mother, born in Bialystok, called them Bialys. My Galitzianer father owned a grocery/deli in NJ and had fresh bagels and bialys delivered from NY every morning. I never heard my mother refer to them as kuchen, although I now know that was the proper name for them.

Mark

 



On 2020-07-16 5:02 pm, Glenda Rubin wrote:

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏

 

Glenda [Rubin]

Richmond, CA, USA

 

 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:

I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak" (onion-bagel"). 

 

 


--

=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


--

Web sites I manage - Personal home page, Greater Houston Jewish Genealogical Society, Woodside Civic Club, Skala, Ukraine KehilalLink, Joniskelis, Lithuania KehilaLink, and pet volunteer project - Yizkor book project: www.texsys.com/websites.html


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Ittai Hershman
 

Just to note that the "proof" that "Immigration officials changed 'Frank Woodhull' to 'Mary Johnson' on the arrival document suffers from the fact that Frank/Mary was not an immigrant, but a resident alien returning to the US.

And, really, after 131 messages to which I am apologetically adding a 132nd, haven't we flogged this horse to death.  Like all generalizations, there is nuance than can be added; but, the basic truth remains that names were not changed by immigration officials at Ellis Island.  Can we move on?!?

Dayenu,
Ittai Hershman
NYC


Re: Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

Mark Halpern
 

My mother, born in Bialystok, called them Bialys. My Galitzianer father owned a grocery/deli in NJ and had fresh bagels and bialys delivered from NY every morning. I never heard my mother refer to them as kuchen, although I now know that was the proper name for them.

Mark

 

On 2020-07-16 5:02 pm, Glenda Rubin wrote:

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏
 
Glenda [Rubin]
Richmond, CA, USA
 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:
I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak" (onion-bagel"). 




--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Kalisz Front Family #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

 
For information on families from towns in Poland, write to [townname]@jri-poland.org

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M. 
Executive Director, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.
 
 
2a. 


Kalisz Front Family #poland
From: stavknr@...
Date: Thu, 16 Jul 2020 14:28:21 EDT
 
Trying to find any information on the "Front" family who used to live in Kalisz Poland before WW2.
Jankel Front, Elen (Abramska) Front, Mieczyslaw Front

I'll Appreciate any HELP. 

Thanks!

 


JewishGen Lithuania database #lithuania

rv Kaplan
 

All of a sudden I'm getting the error message:
 
Site error: the ionCube PHP Loader needs to be installed. This is a widely used PHP extension for running ionCube protected PHP code, website security and malware blocking. Please visit get-loader.ioncube.com for install assistance.  
 
when I try to access the Lithuania database.
 
Is the site down?
 
Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

eksilverman11@...
 

One thing that might help clarify the uncertainly and/or debate around name-changing at Ellis Island are clear, verifiable accounts of the document flows from ticketing agent to ship to Ellis Island (e.g., manifests, who wrote what, what was passed where, etc.) as well as the processing of individuals (and documents) upon arrival at Ellis Island. Should any of you know of verifiable sources and references (published, that stand up to scholarly rigor), please let us know. 

For what it's worth, every name change in my extended family that I've looked at was post-immigration...and, in at least one case, post-service during WWI by Harris Klinowski, born in the US, who became Harry Kline.

Thanks.


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Bob Bloomberg
 

Yale--Thank you.  Well said, well analyzed.  My objection has been to the absolute position (never ever ever happened) of the no name change at Ellis Island advocates.  You have certainly raised enough questions, I hope, that will make them at least take another look


Re: Need a translation #translation

Yitschok Margareten
 

May 8 1960
I wish you luck and blessings, 
And Ratzil's fortune,
And Montefiore's years,
In your memory.
From your grandma Rachel 
Grandma Rose

(This is written in rhymes)


Re: "Jüdische Familien In Kreuznach" #germany

Ernst-Peter Winter
 

...   To my
surprise, however, it took me to the pre-WWI work that Yann
was originally trying to find!
I'm sure that Yann was searching for
Fink, Andrea: Jüdische Familien in Kreuznach : vom 18.
Jahrhundert bis zum Ersten Weltkrieg ; eine Dokumentation. –
Bad Kreuznach, 2001. – 132 pages!

Ernst-Peter (Winter), Münster (Hessen)


Re: SSDI claim dates #general

Robert Hanna
 

Peter Heilbrunn wrote:
[What to Claim dates refer to on SSDI forms and why can they be materially different from the date of death.]
 
I believe that SSDI refers to the date the person started to collect federal disability insurance.
 
Robert Hanna
NYC


Re: Origin of the name BIALYI #names #belarus

Mark Halpern
 

In the Bialystok area, there are many people with surname of Bialostocki (and similar spellings). I would assume that the surname Bialy is a shortening of the Bialostocki surname. 

As for Bialy's. They are definitely not bagels. They were a staple of my and your Bialystok ancestors lives. As Glenda says, the full name of these "rolls" was Bialystoker Kuchen. In the US these days Bialys are sold in many places, but the only ones that look and taste like the originals are at Kossar's Bialys in New York's Lower East Side and other bakeries in New York City. For more about this Bialystok delicacy, read Mimi Sheraton's book "The Bialy Eaters."

BTW, there is one restaurant in Bialystok that sells Bialy's, but they are small rolls with some poppy seeds on top -- tasty, but definitely no comparison to real Bialys. 

Mark Halpern
son of a Bialystoker mother

 

On 2020-07-16 5:02 pm, Glenda Rubin wrote:

My family (from NY) were language sticklers.  We called this baked good, kuchens or Bialystocker kuchens, where they, presumably, originated.  My guess is that kuchen is Yiddish, derived from cake in German.  My parents would get annoyed when people called them bialys and wouldn't hesitate to correct them, which of course had no effect. 😏
 
Glenda [Rubin]
Richmond, CA, USA
 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:16 PM Kris Murawski <krismurawski24@...> wrote:
I believed always it was the Americab name of a bagel variety from Bialystok. It was known in Poland as „cebulak" (onion-bagel"). 




--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Re: MyHeritage Ask The Expert series - Jewish records #announcements

Ellen Barnett Cleary
 

sounds interesting. This link isn’t working for me. 


Recommendations for scanning photos #photographs

loren greenberg
 

Dear All,

I would appreciate your recommendations for high quality photo scanning.
Do you have a favorite smart phone app?
Do you use a physical photo scanner?
I need to produce museum quality scans of my photos.

Thank you in advance,

Loren Greenberg

Volpiansky, Rudstein - Balbieriskis, Kaunas in Lithuania
Shafir, Melamed, Vinograd, Agazin - Starokonstantinov in Ukraine
Milner - Smiltene in Latvia
Abelow - Merkine in Lithuania
Golub(ofsky), Perlow(ofsky) - Vasilishki, Belarus

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