Date   
Odp: Re: How to recruit JewishGenners in Russia, Poland or Ukraine #general

Julia Koszewska <julia_koszewska@...>
 

Dear Genners,
We have talked about it several times. If u need some help >from Poland I'm native
polish speaker and i live here- in capital of Poland, Warsaw. and i hope i'll be
able to help U, so please contact me privately if u need something >from Poland
or maybe some translations >from polish into english (or french). if i only have
time i'm translating some polish records which u post on JewishGen.
but if u need some official organization >from Poland, there is still an agenda
of Lauder Foundation, which with cooperation with national Jewish Historical
Institute has genealogical branch- specialized of course wish Jewish roots in
Poland (or former area of Poland). People who work for this branch of Lauder's
Foundation are members of this discussion group.
Best regards- Julia

"mark" < mark306@... > wrote in message
news:001501c5af01$e7a84580$0fc6da51@user5...

Dear Genners. It's a pitty that there is nobody >from Russia,Poland or Ukrain
in our discussion(according to the emails). There are our roots and there we
must consentrate our searches. The question is how to "force" them to
contact? They can help us in our search in archives,cemetaries, etc. I would
be very happy if we could discuss it. It can be very helpful
Best wishes
Wajsenberg Mark
Israel
mark306@...
First of all let us not talk about forcing anyone to do anything - although
I know you put it in inverted commas.

There must be genealogical bodies - whether Jewish or otherwise - in these
countries.< snip >
--
Nick Landau
London, UK

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Odp: Re: How to recruit JewishGenners in Russia, Poland or Ukraine #general

Julia Koszewska <julia_koszewska@...>
 

Dear Genners,
We have talked about it several times. If u need some help >from Poland I'm native
polish speaker and i live here- in capital of Poland, Warsaw. and i hope i'll be
able to help U, so please contact me privately if u need something >from Poland
or maybe some translations >from polish into english (or french). if i only have
time i'm translating some polish records which u post on JewishGen.
but if u need some official organization >from Poland, there is still an agenda
of Lauder Foundation, which with cooperation with national Jewish Historical
Institute has genealogical branch- specialized of course wish Jewish roots in
Poland (or former area of Poland). People who work for this branch of Lauder's
Foundation are members of this discussion group.
Best regards- Julia

"mark" < mark306@... > wrote in message
news:001501c5af01$e7a84580$0fc6da51@user5...

Dear Genners. It's a pitty that there is nobody >from Russia,Poland or Ukrain
in our discussion(according to the emails). There are our roots and there we
must consentrate our searches. The question is how to "force" them to
contact? They can help us in our search in archives,cemetaries, etc. I would
be very happy if we could discuss it. It can be very helpful
Best wishes
Wajsenberg Mark
Israel
mark306@...
First of all let us not talk about forcing anyone to do anything - although
I know you put it in inverted commas.

There must be genealogical bodies - whether Jewish or otherwise - in these
countries.< snip >
--
Nick Landau
London, UK

Mlada Boleslav Cemetery #austria-czech

peter bakos <pgbakos@...>
 

Hi Fellow Siggers,

Last week I finally had the chance to visit Mlada Boleslav (formerly Jung
Bunzlau) the home of the Podwinecz family as far as is known.

The archivist there is very kind and I will be going back next week to see
the local census >from 1910 and other records she needed some days to obtain.

She showed me a geography of Bohemia which listed the towns and showed the
names of the lords. The Freiherren von Waldstein owned 20 towns in the area
one of which is called Podwinecz but which I cannot find on any map. I am
fascinated by the connection but have no idea if there were Jewish people
living in that village.

I also visited the cemetery in Jung Bunzlau, which is guarded by a very kind
man and his wife. I think he is a school teacher.

They have a photocopied print of the guide to the cemetery done in 1891 by
Herman Pollak, called Plan fur die am Ende des Jahres 5651 auf dem
israelitischen Friedhofe zu Jungbunzlau.
The lisitings give a name, foowed usually by a comma and another name, then
a comma and the year, then the row and column number indicating the place of
burial.

Many of the older stones are broken and indecipherable >from wear, much less
being in Hebrew, which I cannot read.

I am also bewildered by some names and hope someone can shed light on the
following:
Berocho, Susskind, Jentel, Gedaliah, Feisch Ber, Chajele, Lejb, Liebe,
Liebele, Bogelli, Abdon, Fradl, Iechel, Uwizdor, Brodl.

I also do not understand what a third name in the oisting means, but suppose
it is the maiden name of a wife.

I hope someone will be able to help.

Thanks

Peter Bakos
Budapest, at least for now

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Mlada Boleslav Cemetery #austria-czech

peter bakos <pgbakos@...>
 

Hi Fellow Siggers,

Last week I finally had the chance to visit Mlada Boleslav (formerly Jung
Bunzlau) the home of the Podwinecz family as far as is known.

The archivist there is very kind and I will be going back next week to see
the local census >from 1910 and other records she needed some days to obtain.

She showed me a geography of Bohemia which listed the towns and showed the
names of the lords. The Freiherren von Waldstein owned 20 towns in the area
one of which is called Podwinecz but which I cannot find on any map. I am
fascinated by the connection but have no idea if there were Jewish people
living in that village.

I also visited the cemetery in Jung Bunzlau, which is guarded by a very kind
man and his wife. I think he is a school teacher.

They have a photocopied print of the guide to the cemetery done in 1891 by
Herman Pollak, called Plan fur die am Ende des Jahres 5651 auf dem
israelitischen Friedhofe zu Jungbunzlau.
The lisitings give a name, foowed usually by a comma and another name, then
a comma and the year, then the row and column number indicating the place of
burial.

Many of the older stones are broken and indecipherable >from wear, much less
being in Hebrew, which I cannot read.

I am also bewildered by some names and hope someone can shed light on the
following:
Berocho, Susskind, Jentel, Gedaliah, Feisch Ber, Chajele, Lejb, Liebe,
Liebele, Bogelli, Abdon, Fradl, Iechel, Uwizdor, Brodl.

I also do not understand what a third name in the oisting means, but suppose
it is the maiden name of a wife.

I hope someone will be able to help.

Thanks

Peter Bakos
Budapest, at least for now

"Emigration House" Opens in Bremerhaven #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a story of interest to researchers in today's New York Times about
emigration >from the port of Bremerhaven, and a new museum, known in German
as Deutsches Auswanderer Haus--or "Emigration House"--which opened in that
city a few weeks ago. The story can be read at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/international/europe/02bremerhaven.html

This museum tells the flip side of the experiences detailed at New York's
Ellis Island Museum--the departure of our ancestors to a new, unknown world,
versus their arrival in a strange land. And in this case, they were not
just heading to New York, but to ports in Canada, Brazil, Argentina and
Australia. Although Hamburg has been planning an emigration museum for years
(now scheduled to open in 2007), Bremerhaven's is the first to open in
Europe. You can learn more about it on the website:

http://www.dah-bremerhaven.de/english/hauptseite.html

It is interesting to note that Bremerhaven came into existence as a major
port to accommodate the overflow demand on the port of Hamburg, and its
prominence was due to efforts of one man, a Jew named Albert Ballin, who
took over the operations of his father's ticket-booking service and
eventually became general director of HAPAG, which is still one of Europe's
biggest shipping companies.

The complex he also built in Hamburg, on an island in the middle of the Elbe
River once held over 30 buildings, including dormitories, a bathhouse, and a
synagogue where housed people during their layovers between arriving in
Germany and departing for various ports.

The new Bremerhaven Auswanderer Haus is currently simulating the immigrant
experience for visitors, and introducing them to a specific immigrant by
providing a magnetic card with the story of one specific person, and
detailing each person's life story. On their website you can take a virtual
"tour" of the museum, and if you visit in person, they appear to have a
computer center called "forum migration" where you can use their database
and archives to "research your ancestors and discover the meaning of your
family's name." There does not appear to be any online research available
on the museum's website.

Also of interest might be the German Emigrants Database at the Historisches
Museum Bremerhaven at:

http://www.historisches-museum-bremerhaven.de/index.php?id=128

which contains information on emigrants who left Europe for the United
States of America between 1820 and 1939, primarily >from German ports, taken
from passenger manifests.
This new museum might be a destination one might want to add to a European
itinerary to gain another perspective into our ancestors' emigration
experience.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Emigration House" Opens in Bremerhaven #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a story of interest to researchers in today's New York Times about
emigration >from the port of Bremerhaven, and a new museum, known in German
as Deutsches Auswanderer Haus--or "Emigration House"--which opened in that
city a few weeks ago. The story can be read at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/international/europe/02bremerhaven.html

This museum tells the flip side of the experiences detailed at New York's
Ellis Island Museum--the departure of our ancestors to a new, unknown world,
versus their arrival in a strange land. And in this case, they were not
just heading to New York, but to ports in Canada, Brazil, Argentina and
Australia. Although Hamburg has been planning an emigration museum for years
(now scheduled to open in 2007), Bremerhaven's is the first to open in
Europe. You can learn more about it on the website:

http://www.dah-bremerhaven.de/english/hauptseite.html

It is interesting to note that Bremerhaven came into existence as a major
port to accommodate the overflow demand on the port of Hamburg, and its
prominence was due to efforts of one man, a Jew named Albert Ballin, who
took over the operations of his father's ticket-booking service and
eventually became general director of HAPAG, which is still one of Europe's
biggest shipping companies.

The complex he also built in Hamburg, on an island in the middle of the Elbe
River once held over 30 buildings, including dormitories, a bathhouse, and a
synagogue where housed people during their layovers between arriving in
Germany and departing for various ports.

The new Bremerhaven Auswanderer Haus is currently simulating the immigrant
experience for visitors, and introducing them to a specific immigrant by
providing a magnetic card with the story of one specific person, and
detailing each person's life story. On their website you can take a virtual
"tour" of the museum, and if you visit in person, they appear to have a
computer center called "forum migration" where you can use their database
and archives to "research your ancestors and discover the meaning of your
family's name." There does not appear to be any online research available
on the museum's website.

Also of interest might be the German Emigrants Database at the Historisches
Museum Bremerhaven at:

http://www.historisches-museum-bremerhaven.de/index.php?id=128

which contains information on emigrants who left Europe for the United
States of America between 1820 and 1939, primarily >from German ports, taken
from passenger manifests.
This new museum might be a destination one might want to add to a European
itinerary to gain another perspective into our ancestors' emigration
experience.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...

Deathindexes.com (TITNER in Minnesota) #general

m leonards <m_leonards@...>
 

Jill Ullman is looking for information about her TITNER family >from
Minnesota.

I'd like to remind everyone about the site deathindexes.com, which is a
regularly updated list of death indexes available for all the states.

Clicking on Minnesota reveals that the large fee-based commercial site has
an index to Minnesota deaths. But the Minnesota Historical Society also has
a free index covering 1905--1996 (I'm not sure whether it's complete).

A search on TITNER (Soundex) reveals entries for Sam TETNER, who died in
Hennepin County in 1946, and for Harry TITNER, who died there in 1962.
Harry's mother's maiden name was RABINOWITZ. There is also Lottie TITNER,
who died in 1960. Unfortunately, it appears that her mother's maiden name
was "unknown".

According to the site, the actual certificate should include more
information, including the decedant's father's and/or spouse's name. Of
course, there are no guarantees--as we all know, death certificates are
often incomplete.

The site provides an easy way to order copies of the certificates for a very
reasonable $8 each.

Good luck in your research!
Monica Leonards
suburban Philadelphia

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Deathindexes.com (TITNER in Minnesota) #general

m leonards <m_leonards@...>
 

Jill Ullman is looking for information about her TITNER family >from
Minnesota.

I'd like to remind everyone about the site deathindexes.com, which is a
regularly updated list of death indexes available for all the states.

Clicking on Minnesota reveals that the large fee-based commercial site has
an index to Minnesota deaths. But the Minnesota Historical Society also has
a free index covering 1905--1996 (I'm not sure whether it's complete).

A search on TITNER (Soundex) reveals entries for Sam TETNER, who died in
Hennepin County in 1946, and for Harry TITNER, who died there in 1962.
Harry's mother's maiden name was RABINOWITZ. There is also Lottie TITNER,
who died in 1960. Unfortunately, it appears that her mother's maiden name
was "unknown".

According to the site, the actual certificate should include more
information, including the decedant's father's and/or spouse's name. Of
course, there are no guarantees--as we all know, death certificates are
often incomplete.

The site provides an easy way to order copies of the certificates for a very
reasonable $8 each.

Good luck in your research!
Monica Leonards
suburban Philadelphia

Interview with Stuart Tower, #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Stuart TOWER, author of "The Wayfarers",
was the JGS of Montreal's featured speaker in May, 2005.

On Saturday, September 3rd, 2005, at 8:30am (EST)
journalist Leslie Lutsky's radio interview with Stuart Tower
will be broadcast on Montreal radio and can be listened
to online at: http://www.radiocentreville.com/

*For Montrealers - please set your dial at 102.3 FM at 8:30am*
on Saturday, September 3rd
to hear this interesting and informative interview!
~~~
Merle Kastner
JGS of Montreal, Programming
merlek@...
~~~

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Interview with Stuart Tower, #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Stuart TOWER, author of "The Wayfarers",
was the JGS of Montreal's featured speaker in May, 2005.

On Saturday, September 3rd, 2005, at 8:30am (EST)
journalist Leslie Lutsky's radio interview with Stuart Tower
will be broadcast on Montreal radio and can be listened
to online at: http://www.radiocentreville.com/

*For Montrealers - please set your dial at 102.3 FM at 8:30am*
on Saturday, September 3rd
to hear this interesting and informative interview!
~~~
Merle Kastner
JGS of Montreal, Programming
merlek@...
~~~

Matrilineal Ancestry [was: Female's patrilineal ancestry] #dna

mhlcswc2@...
 

On 2005.08.31, Elzbieta Kniaz <kniaziniaela@...> asked:

As a female can I check my ancestry on my father's side?
I've just gotten "The Seven Daughters Of Eve" by Sykes >from my
library. It has been recommended to me by people on this list as it
discusses tracing females >from females, Mitochondrial DNA. I know
that this question has been answered and I thought that I had saved
it but I can't find it. If you google MtDNA you get a lot of
results.

Marcia Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

DNA Research #DNA Matrilineal Ancestry [was: Female's patrilineal ancestry] #dna

mhlcswc2@...
 

On 2005.08.31, Elzbieta Kniaz <kniaziniaela@...> asked:

As a female can I check my ancestry on my father's side?
I've just gotten "The Seven Daughters Of Eve" by Sykes >from my
library. It has been recommended to me by people on this list as it
discusses tracing females >from females, Mitochondrial DNA. I know
that this question has been answered and I thought that I had saved
it but I can't find it. If you google MtDNA you get a lot of
results.

Marcia Hoffman
Baltimore, MD

3 great grandchildren & 2 great great grandchildren of Gadaliah Reznik meet #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

I wish to relate a success story to encourage those of you who are at a
brick wall.
For my parents 50th anniversary in 1985 I did my first family tree. My
father had an excellent memory and gave me info back to his great
grandfather.
When the Yad Vashem database went out line I wrote to a woman in the Ukraine
and a woman in NY who had immigrate >from Russia.
Berta, the daughter of the woman in the Ukraine turns out to be my second
cousin. Her grandfather and my grandmother were brother and sister. Zila,
the woman in NY is her aunt - my first cousin once removed(?). We exchanged
letters and info.
Then the daughter of another second cousin I knew nothing about wrote to the
woman in NY to do a family tree and Zila told her to contact me. It seems
that she immigrated to Israel about 12 years ago and didn't know she had
family here. After her, her parents came. Last week we had a meeting in
Jerusalem with Berta who is here visiting >from the Ukraine, Anatoly her
cousin (my second) who lives here, his daughter and...... another second
cousin once removed (she is the descendant >from a third child of my great
grandfather, who knows Anatloy's family in Jerusalem but didn't know she was
related, not once but twice. Once throught the Reznik line and once through
the Kaminsky line.
Now we just have to find descendants of the 4 other children of our great
grandfather.
Really unbelievable! So don't give up hope, and keep searching now. If you
think a generation or two ago our relatives scattered when leaving the
Ukraine, the younger generation has scattered over even a wider part of the
world.
Rose Feldman
GITNER, REZNIK Litin & Kalinovka Ukraine
EPSTEIN, BOYARKSY Ruzhany, Kossovo, Mscibow Belarus
TREPPER, TREPMAN, FELDMAN, LICHT, SOICHER, SLOVIK, SZPERBER, ORENSTEIN
Warsaw Poland

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine 3 great grandchildren & 2 great great grandchildren of Gadaliah Reznik meet #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

I wish to relate a success story to encourage those of you who are at a
brick wall.
For my parents 50th anniversary in 1985 I did my first family tree. My
father had an excellent memory and gave me info back to his great
grandfather.
When the Yad Vashem database went out line I wrote to a woman in the Ukraine
and a woman in NY who had immigrate >from Russia.
Berta, the daughter of the woman in the Ukraine turns out to be my second
cousin. Her grandfather and my grandmother were brother and sister. Zila,
the woman in NY is her aunt - my first cousin once removed(?). We exchanged
letters and info.
Then the daughter of another second cousin I knew nothing about wrote to the
woman in NY to do a family tree and Zila told her to contact me. It seems
that she immigrated to Israel about 12 years ago and didn't know she had
family here. After her, her parents came. Last week we had a meeting in
Jerusalem with Berta who is here visiting >from the Ukraine, Anatoly her
cousin (my second) who lives here, his daughter and...... another second
cousin once removed (she is the descendant >from a third child of my great
grandfather, who knows Anatloy's family in Jerusalem but didn't know she was
related, not once but twice. Once throught the Reznik line and once through
the Kaminsky line.
Now we just have to find descendants of the 4 other children of our great
grandfather.
Really unbelievable! So don't give up hope, and keep searching now. If you
think a generation or two ago our relatives scattered when leaving the
Ukraine, the younger generation has scattered over even a wider part of the
world.
Rose Feldman
GITNER, REZNIK Litin & Kalinovka Ukraine
EPSTEIN, BOYARKSY Ruzhany, Kossovo, Mscibow Belarus
TREPPER, TREPMAN, FELDMAN, LICHT, SOICHER, SLOVIK, SZPERBER, ORENSTEIN
Warsaw Poland

Re: Cemetery Offices #general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

I went to a couple NY cemeteries, maybe 10 years ago,
and they were very helpful(I didn't call ahead). I
went on a Sunday, which is the day I thought the staff
would be there, and they were. They had records of
who was buried where - I got maps to my gr
grandparents' plots, and when I found my gr
grandmother's foster mother in one, I ran back and
found out that her husband was buried many years
before she was (1864), elsewhere in the cemetery.

Actually I had phoned one of the cemeteries a few
years before that, and the staff gave me my gr
grandfather's death date over the phone.

So my experience was very positive. The cemeteries I
dealt with were very helpful.

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NJ

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cemetery Offices #general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

I went to a couple NY cemeteries, maybe 10 years ago,
and they were very helpful(I didn't call ahead). I
went on a Sunday, which is the day I thought the staff
would be there, and they were. They had records of
who was buried where - I got maps to my gr
grandparents' plots, and when I found my gr
grandmother's foster mother in one, I ran back and
found out that her husband was buried many years
before she was (1864), elsewhere in the cemetery.

Actually I had phoned one of the cemeteries a few
years before that, and the staff gave me my gr
grandfather's death date over the phone.

So my experience was very positive. The cemeteries I
dealt with were very helpful.

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NJ

Creation of shipping manifests? #general

Doug Mason
 

I very recently posted an enquiry asking how a ship's Manifest (passenger
list) was compiled. I have thought about this a bit more, and want to
share my thoughts so people can correct me and can help my understanding.

The question was raised in my mind because the name "Sam" was miswritten
on a Manifest as "Lain". A completely understandable mistake, if the
source used by the author of the Manifest was a written document.

The person named "Lain" was not a passenger. He was the husband of a
passenger, whom she was going to join in USA. Her husband had already been
in USA for about 5 years. Hence the error has nothing to do with an
indexer of the Ellis Island record.

The actual manifest is typed, not handwritten. To see it, search for Alta
MANDELBAUM. She arrived on the "Baltic" in November 1920.

Searches for other arrivals of the "Baltic" around that time show that the
Manifests for those journeys are also typed. (The only handwritten entries
are for the names of the members of the crew.) Presumably, comparisons of
handwriting for several journeys of another ship might also show all their
Manifests were written by the one person.

This shows me that a Manifest was created by the management of the ship,
not by the US Immigration service. This is corroborated by the fact that
the Commander or Master signs an Affidavit before the Immigration Officer
certifying to the correctness of his Manifest.

I assume, therefore, that the ship's company created the Manifest either
before the ship departed for USA or it was compiled on board.

Presumably, the writer of a Manifest had access to passengers' documents
and to information provided orally.

How were questions posed to passengers who could not speak English? How
did those passengers respond? The fact that "Lain" is a written error,
rather than an oral error, indicates information was provided in writing.

Alta gives her father's surname as "Lukerblatt". The father of her sister
has the same name. But her sister's surname is given as "Fukerblatt".
Clearly a written source was used by the writer of the Manifest.

Perhaps someone knows the name(s) of sister ships to the "Baltic" and
could tell me if their Manifests were also typed, perhaps on the same
typewriter. It would be better to search for journeys taken in the period
1919 to 1921.

Since Manifests were compiled >from primary sources (written and oral),
Manifests are a secondary source. It is obviously far better if possible
to locate the passenger's application for Naturalization, since this is a
primary source.

A Manifest provided a standardised format for providing information to the
Immigration bureaucracy.

I am simply trying to make a sense of this for myself. I was once told: "a
text without a context is a pretext".

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Creation of shipping manifests? #general

Doug Mason
 

I very recently posted an enquiry asking how a ship's Manifest (passenger
list) was compiled. I have thought about this a bit more, and want to
share my thoughts so people can correct me and can help my understanding.

The question was raised in my mind because the name "Sam" was miswritten
on a Manifest as "Lain". A completely understandable mistake, if the
source used by the author of the Manifest was a written document.

The person named "Lain" was not a passenger. He was the husband of a
passenger, whom she was going to join in USA. Her husband had already been
in USA for about 5 years. Hence the error has nothing to do with an
indexer of the Ellis Island record.

The actual manifest is typed, not handwritten. To see it, search for Alta
MANDELBAUM. She arrived on the "Baltic" in November 1920.

Searches for other arrivals of the "Baltic" around that time show that the
Manifests for those journeys are also typed. (The only handwritten entries
are for the names of the members of the crew.) Presumably, comparisons of
handwriting for several journeys of another ship might also show all their
Manifests were written by the one person.

This shows me that a Manifest was created by the management of the ship,
not by the US Immigration service. This is corroborated by the fact that
the Commander or Master signs an Affidavit before the Immigration Officer
certifying to the correctness of his Manifest.

I assume, therefore, that the ship's company created the Manifest either
before the ship departed for USA or it was compiled on board.

Presumably, the writer of a Manifest had access to passengers' documents
and to information provided orally.

How were questions posed to passengers who could not speak English? How
did those passengers respond? The fact that "Lain" is a written error,
rather than an oral error, indicates information was provided in writing.

Alta gives her father's surname as "Lukerblatt". The father of her sister
has the same name. But her sister's surname is given as "Fukerblatt".
Clearly a written source was used by the writer of the Manifest.

Perhaps someone knows the name(s) of sister ships to the "Baltic" and
could tell me if their Manifests were also typed, perhaps on the same
typewriter. It would be better to search for journeys taken in the period
1919 to 1921.

Since Manifests were compiled >from primary sources (written and oral),
Manifests are a secondary source. It is obviously far better if possible
to locate the passenger's application for Naturalization, since this is a
primary source.

A Manifest provided a standardised format for providing information to the
Immigration bureaucracy.

I am simply trying to make a sense of this for myself. I was once told: "a
text without a context is a pretext".

Doug Mason
Melbourne
Australia

Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Judith Lipmanson <lipmanson@...>
 

Alan's post brings up an interesting question: what was the average
amount of time between Declarations of Intent and Petition for
Naturalization -- in NY, app. 1900?

I found a copy of my grandfather's Declaration among some papers
belonging to a cousin who inherited them but had no interest in learning
more about this ancestor. Some of the information on the Declaration
appeared to be erroneous -- probably deliberately on the part of my
grandfather . (He fudged about his age and his date of arrival -- two
habits he kept throughout his life.) I'm keeping in mind that this
information could be accurate and later information erroneous, but had
he immigrated when he states on this document, he would have been a
married man with two children at the age of 14. Doubtful.

I am now going to search for the final papers, and wonder where (which
year) to start. Was it a matter of weeks, months, or years between the
initial petition and final Petition? Was the entire process controlled
by the petitioner or by the Government at that time?

Judith Lipmanson

--
Subject: Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US
From: "Alan D Glick" < aglick1@... >
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2005 12:23:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

Naturalization Papers. In my own case my GF's Declaration of Intent
(first papers) had the date off by one week, but the Petition for
Naturalization (final papers) had the correct date. In addition to port of
entry, these papers told me the date of arrival, the approximate date of
departure, the name of the ship, where the ship embarked from, the
birthplace of my GF, his birthdate, current residence, occupation, age, his
original name, and his wife's birthyear. For me, most of this was a
treasure trove of new information.
I had also spent much time on the Ellis Island web site with a fruitless
search, until his Naturalization Papers told me he arrived in Boston. With
the info >from his papers I've ordered the passenger list >from my local FHL
branch and it should be arriving any day now.
Alan Glick >>>

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US #general

Judith Lipmanson <lipmanson@...>
 

Alan's post brings up an interesting question: what was the average
amount of time between Declarations of Intent and Petition for
Naturalization -- in NY, app. 1900?

I found a copy of my grandfather's Declaration among some papers
belonging to a cousin who inherited them but had no interest in learning
more about this ancestor. Some of the information on the Declaration
appeared to be erroneous -- probably deliberately on the part of my
grandfather . (He fudged about his age and his date of arrival -- two
habits he kept throughout his life.) I'm keeping in mind that this
information could be accurate and later information erroneous, but had
he immigrated when he states on this document, he would have been a
married man with two children at the age of 14. Doubtful.

I am now going to search for the final papers, and wonder where (which
year) to start. Was it a matter of weeks, months, or years between the
initial petition and final Petition? Was the entire process controlled
by the petitioner or by the Government at that time?

Judith Lipmanson

--
Subject: Re: Best approach to determining port of entry to US
From: "Alan D Glick" < aglick1@... >
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2005 12:23:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

Naturalization Papers. In my own case my GF's Declaration of Intent
(first papers) had the date off by one week, but the Petition for
Naturalization (final papers) had the correct date. In addition to port of
entry, these papers told me the date of arrival, the approximate date of
departure, the name of the ship, where the ship embarked from, the
birthplace of my GF, his birthdate, current residence, occupation, age, his
original name, and his wife's birthyear. For me, most of this was a
treasure trove of new information.
I had also spent much time on the Ellis Island web site with a fruitless
search, until his Naturalization Papers told me he arrived in Boston. With
the info >from his papers I've ordered the passenger list >from my local FHL
branch and it should be arriving any day now.
Alan Glick >>>