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Re: are there benefits of the My Heritage site over Ancestry #general

JPmiaou@...
 

Every historical record match that I've seen on MyHeritage (or more accurately, glimpsed through the paywall) has been from FamilySearch, which is free. MH is not actually a repository, but a data aggregator: a specialized search engine. Since much of its material comes from otherwise free sites, this results in countless instances of attempting to charge money for freely-available data.

One thing I find especially annoying on MH is that they make no distinction between historical records and user-submitted conclusions. They present tree matches in exactly the same format and wording as record matches.

Julia
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help with ged/dna #dna

 

I have a problem I have 17% European Jewish DNA , only one is my grandfather possibility He was born in Via Austria  his mother left him at the border to Hungary and He had a note pined on saying his name Lipot or Leopold and mothers name

 Apollonia .He grow up in a orphanage , have nothing else .

At gedmatch  I see lot of Jewish names  Kit A490637 (*Borveto)

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Do all descendants of your great-grandfather all have similar Jewish DNA markers?  If they are only seen in one of his children's line it suggests differing parentage.

Every child inherits 50% of DNA from each parent, but each is a random assortment of the parent's DNA. So you and a sibling only share 25%. That is why organ transplant Dr. look at parents or children first for a good match.

So all descendants of a great-grandparent will not have the same Jewish DNA markers. There are a lot of markers checked, so DNA testing will probably find some, but not all the same.

Sally Bruckheimer
Molecular Biologist who knew this in high school
Princeton, NJ


Re: Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna

Jesse Springer
 

Interesting! Certainly helpful to know. Thanks! 


On Tue, Jul 28, 2020, 10:53 AM C Chaykin <cchaykin@...> wrote:
A note about DNA results... Two Jewish great grandparents may yield results similar to one Jewish grandparent, in terms of percentages of Jewish ancestry. (Ditto for four great great grandparents, etc.)


Re: DNA tests for genealogy in Israel #dna

JPmiaou@...
 

23 and Me says it ships to Israel: https://customercare.23andme.com/hc/en-us/articles/360000145307-What-Countries-Do-You-Ship-To-

Like Ancestry, 23 and Me does not take uploads from other companies, but unlike Ancestry, they do report (basic) Y- and mitochondrial haplogroups. They also have a reasonably large portion of their customer base with Ashkenazi ancestry, and they have a complex algorithm for sorting such matches beyond the basic centimorgans or percentages (which can be misleading for endogamous populations).

Julia
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Re: Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna

Jesse Springer
 

Wow, that's incredible! Thank you so much for sharing that story--it inspires me to keep searching. Is there a way to contact the Jewish Museum in Dublin to see if they could offer any insight? 


On Tue, Jul 28, 2020, 10:44 AM <2gag4u@...> wrote:
This may not be of any direct assistance but I wanted to offer a parallel example of Jew's melding into Irish Catholic society. While working in San Francisco I was introduced to a woman whose name is Yvonne O'Connor. She had 12 siblings and fell right in the middle by age. After a number of years of close friendship she told me a story about her last trip home to Dublin. To her great surprise she found an old photo in the coal shed of her grandfather. He was known as "Altman the Salt man". After some cajoling with her extended family some things became clearer to her. There were certain burial traditions that the extended family followed that clearly were not Catholic. There was one older member of thee family that would not eat pork. A member or two would not travel on the sabbath.

Eventually she was reconciled to the fact that she was Jewish. Please keep in mind that this was a Catholic girl that had to dig deep into Irish history and eventually found family names in Synagogue records. She imparted to me that "Altman the Salt man" was a character in one of James Joyce's novel "Ulysses". She is now the director of the Jewish Museum in Dublin. She speaks many languages, is well traveled and knows much about Jewish history on the "Isle". If you are inclined she might have something to offer.

There is a significant Jewish world in Scotland and it is not uncommon for people to adopt culture and unintentionally lose some family history. Good Luck!


Re: Is this name the same? #names

Sherri Bobish
 


MaryAnn,

You asked:  "Is the name MOVSHA another name for Moses?"

Yes, it is.  Moses, Movsha, Moishe, and other variations.

Hope this helps,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Re: Is this name the same? #names

Dr.Josef ASH
 

O, yes
as well as Moshe, Moishe, Moisej, Misha, Musa...


Re: Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna

JPmiaou@...
 

Keep in mind that all admixture reports from all companies are still at the level of "for entertainment value only" -- and MyHeritage is the absolute clown of the bunch. They predict ancestry that is ridiculously false for basically everyone. (For me, it's Swedish; for my cousin, it's British Isles. Both of us actually have all of our ancestors squarely in the Carpathian Basin.)

Ashkenazi genetics is endogamous enough that it's pretty confidently identifiable, even by MyHeritage, but the percentages they report can be wildly different from other companies. When it comes to something like "West Asian", all bets are off: neither the reference populations nor the customer base have even remotely enough representatives from this area to come to any definitive conclusions.

What it comes down to is that despite what all the DNA companies would have you believe, geography is not genetic.

Julia
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Re: Looking for 19thC marriage record in NYC(?) #usa #austria-czech

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Although I said there weren't a lot of marriage licenses before 1900 in NYC, which is correct, that doesn't mean you shouldn't try. 2 sets of my ggrandparents married in 1870, and both have marriage records.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Re: Use of "ben Avraham" on a headstone #general

Jeff Lieberman
 

Thanks, Sherri. I've been able to confirm that I have the correct birth record. I know he didn't have a good childhood, and he didn't like to talk about his birth family, so it's possible that my family never knew his father's name. (His mother died a few days after he was born from a postpartum infection, his father remarried, and, apparently, he felt rejected by his father & stepmother after they had a son of their own.) His marriage application only adds to the confusion since he listed his parents as Harry & Pearl, which wasn't true. Given the circumstances, it's possible that he avoided any mention of his parents or their actual names.


Re: IAJGS Conference Announcement #jgs-iajgs #education #events #announcements

Chuck Weinstein
 

They will be available when the Conference starts.  If you are registered, you will receive further information just before the Conference begins.  

Chuck Weinstein


Re: Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna

Jerry Scherer
 

Your regions of ancestral origins are statistical estimates, based on the company’s database. Your Ethnicity Estimates are updated by the ancestry company, as more people get tested. Ancestry has a database of approximately 15 million, MyHeritage 4 million. My first estimates, with Ancestry.com, showed that I was 95% European Jewish, next 99%.  The last update, shows that I’m 100% European Jewish. According to MyHeritage, I'm 94% Ashkenazi Jewish and 6% Sephardic Jewish. 


Re: Looking for 19thC marriage record in NYC(?) #usa #austria-czech

neilan1
 

One must not discount the possibility of mis-spellings on the original records. For several years, in the NYC Municipal Archives, I had searched for the marriage license of my maternal grandparents,  Charles Black & Nellie Cohen, married March 20, 1892.  I even tried using their Hebrew names - Yisrael Yechezkel and Nechama. I finally stumbled on it after using several combinations of spellings. They are listed on the license as  ESRIAL BLOCK and MILLIE COHEN.  Nellie's mother is listed as Mary CHONE. I suspect that some of the clerks in the office were, themselves, recent immigrants. On my mother's B.C., her parents are listed as coming from RUSHA.

Also, many times, a Jewish bride and groom only had a religious marriage, without it being registered by the city. 


Re: marriage record from Zilina #hungary #slovakia

JPmiaou@...
 

Even before the plague, "reel-only" items were in a sort of limbo ever since FamilySearch discontinued microfilm distribution several years ago. (The materials and equipment had simply become cost-prohibitive.) Many (most?) of these films are actually digitized, as evidenced by the number in the catalog's DGS column, and they are actually online; they're just not on the parts of the FS servers that can be seen from the "front door". You need some form of "back door" access, for which there are various bits of software written by various genealogist-programmers around the world. The one I use was written by a Hungarian genealogist and computer whiz who lives in Germany but is one of the more active members of MACSE (the Hungarian genealogy association).

I can't seem to attach anything to messages in this interface, but I have looked up the marriage in question; it's on image 767 of digital film number 4946483. (Being 1942, it's in Slovak.)

Julia
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Genealogy Software For Family Trees #general

Teewinot
 

Hi Cousins,

I've decided it's time I got some software to make my family tree, but
there are so many to choose from, it's giving me a headache! So I
thought I'd ask for recommendations.

Here is what I need:

1. A program that lets me include every family member (siblings;
cousins; aunts and uncles; 1st, 2nd, etc. marriages; etc.) in one giant
family tree.

2. A program that lets me enter birth, marriage, death info that is
printed right on the tree itself, so I don't have to refer to any other
documents.

3. A program that will let me print out this tree, even if it means
taping together a whole bunch of sheets, and will also allow me to make
the tree into a PDF file, so I can share it via email.

4. A program that is a true family tree, not just sheets listing
people. (A cousin gave me a printout like that, and it's way too hard
to follow.)

5. The program must be compatible with Windows 10.

I am not interested in anything else. I don't care if the program has
search the Internet features or not. I don't care if it's capable of
uploading or downloading data. I just need to be able to consolidate
all the hand-drawn trees and other papers I have into one coherent tree.

Thank you!
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida
--
teewinot13@...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
RESEARCHING: FRIEDMAN, MILLER, BERKOWITZ (Grodno,
Poland/Russia/Belarus); GEIST (?,Russia); GLICKMAN, KLUGMAN, STURMAN,
KAPLAN, ROTENBERG (Bilgoraj, Lublin, Poland/Russia); LIEB/LEIBOWITZ,
BLAU (Jassy/Iasi, Romania); GALINSKY, GELLIS (Suwalki, Poland/Russia);
KRASNOPOLSKY, SILBERMAN/SILVERMAN (Krasnopol, Poland/Russia)
KOPCIANSKY (?, Poland/Russia); GOLDSTEIN, SCHRAGER (?, Romania);
CYRULNIK (Suwalki, Poland/Russia and Kalvarija, Lithuania)

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Find Address - 30 Osborn, Brooklyn NY #usa

Suzanne Fialkoff
 

Number 28-30 Osborn St.was an apartment building. It was enumerated in the 1925 Kings County Census in AD 23, ED 24, pages 49-50.


Re: DNA tests for genealogy in Israel #dna

Sarah L Meyer
 

Since he is in Israel, MyHeritage can not sell him a kit legally, nor can he upload his results there.  He could upload his results from FTDNA or Ancestry while on his vacation if his device did not show Israeli origination.  Thank the Chief Rabbinate for this.  They don't want people to find out that they are mamzers (the product of a religiously illegal marriage or adultery), because the religious laws against these people are so vile.  DNA is legal in Israel except for the "purpose of finding relatives".  However, I have ordered FTDNA kits that were shipped to Israel, and I have uploaded the results to MyHeritage, because I am in the US.
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Re: Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna

Paul Chirlin
 

Do all descendants of your great-grandfather all have similar Jewish DNA markers?  If they are only seen in one of his children's line it suggests differing parentage.   Is your father not DNA related to a known descendant?  
Paul


Lost relatives in New York #usa

Carol
 

I would love help with one of my (smaller) brick walls.  This is a long shot, but I'm out of ideas! My paternal grandmother came from the shtetl of Vselyb ouside Navardok (Novogrudok), Belarus. The family name was Berkovsky, changed to Brown by the first immigrant. In 1907, Kreine Berkovsy from that town came to NY and was met by her brother Wolf/Velvil. These are certainly my relatives (Kreine is a family name, and my own Jewish name). Our known Kreine and Wolf became Kate and William. I am hampered in tracking down the 1907 siblings by not having a clue what their names became, much less whom she married. Do they ring a bell with anyone in this group?  Happy for other search ideas, but I think my best hope is for somebody to recognize these people and who they became.

Carol Isenberg Clingan

Dedham MA