Date   

Friends of Jewish Cemetery Restoration in Eastern Europe Birds-of-a-Feather (BOF) Meeting #announcements #events

Jeff Miller
 

The Friends of Jewish Cemetery Restoration in Eastern Europe will have a free online meeting on Wednesday, August 12, 11:15 AM - 12:15 PM Eastern Time U.S. (New York), as part of the IAJGS Conference that was planned to be in San Diego but will now be held entirely online. To attend this free meeting, you must first register for the conference at https://s4.goeshow.com/iajgs/annual/2020/registration_form.cfm. There is an option for "free limited access," which enables you to attend the meeting, other SIG/BOF meetings, and the JewishGen Annual Meeting at no cost (but most conference presentations are not available to free attendees).

  

The IAJGS has generously allowed us to offer this meeting for free, with the understanding that it will not be a formal presentation, but an informal networking session. The session will not be recorded. Discussion will revolve around your current projects/volunteer opportunities and issues related to Jewish Cemetery Restoration, Memorialization of the Departed, saving cemeteries from destruction, on-going efforts and success stories in Eastern Europe. You do not need to have a webcam or microphone on your computer, there will be a text chat option. You will receive further instructions about how to join the meeting, but general guidelines are you can gain access anytime up to one hour prior to the meeting start time.

 

Meeting time on Wednesday, August 12: New York 11:15 am -12:15 pm,

 

If you have any questions, please email me directly.

 

Jeff Miller

singingtm@...


Re: Where did the term Galitziana come from? #general

Daniel Bargman
 

You mean: 
 
-Galitzianer
-Spanish province of Galicia - in fact an authonomous region in Spain.
They speak a language (not a dialect): Gallego, mutually understandable with Castellano (Spanish), no need for a translator unless a foreigner has a partial knowledge of Spanish.
 
Nothing to do with Jews. Both places, Spanish Galicia and Polish Galitzia were inhabitated by Celtic tribes  in the past, with the root GAL as an  ethnic marker, see also: PortuGAL, Galia (latin for France), Gales (Spanish for Wales), Gaelic/ Irish language and so on.
 
Daniel Bargman
 


Baiersdorf Jewish Cemetery Website #germany #announcements

Al Lederer
 

The documentation of the Baiersdorf Jewish Cemetery has been completed and is now available for public viewing. The over 600 year old burial ground is located in Middle Franconia, Bavaria in the district of Erlangen-Höchstadt. It once served Baiersdorf, Bruck, Büchenbach, Dormitz, Erlangen, Forchheim, Kunreuth, Wiesenthau, and other towns in the district.

 

The 1,278 gravestones are searchable by the name of the interred and can also be browsed by stone number from 0001 through 1278. The documentation includes German inscriptions, Hebrew inscriptions and their German translations, and photographs of the gravestones.

 

Appreciation to Baiersdorf Mayor Andreas Galster, City Council, and Press and Cultural Affairs Director Daniela Pietsch for their support of the project; Horst Gemeinhardt, city historian who led the effort; University of Bamberg Professors Suzanne Talabardon and Rainer Drewello and students who mapped the gravestones, photographed them, and recorded their German inscriptions; Detlef Mueller who transcribed and translated the Hebrew inscriptions, and created the database; and to others who contributed financially to the effort.

 

The documentation is available at https://www.juedische-geschichte-baiersdorf.de/.

Al Lederer

 


Re: Cracking a brick wall - Hershkowitz in Bucharest in the early 20th century - #romania

Sherri Bobish
 


Marc,

Try searching for a listing in old city directories for Morris Hershkowitz in Bucharest at: https://genealogyindexer.org/

You can limit search location to Bucharest.

I did a soundex search for Hershkowitz, which was not helpful.  But, a soundex search for Herschkowitz found many hits with variant spellings, i.e. Gerskowitz,
Herskovits, and others.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Re: Burial Society Washington Cemetery - Bnai Menasse or Menasche #usa

Sherri Bobish
 


Alan,

You can check if AJHS  has their incorporation papers.

https://www.jewishgen.org/jgsgb/ajhs.html

"Incorporation Papers. Collection I-154 consists of selected incorporation papers, 1848-1920. Approximately 10,000 organizations are represented in 81 bound volumes or 27 reels of microfilm."

Many years ago I was able to get copies of my ggf's landsmanshaftn incorporation papers from AJHS.

Also, there was a synagogue in Phiadelphia, B'nai Menashe.
https://hiddencityphila.org/2015/01/the-last-synagogues-of-strawberry-mansion/
"The name of the synagogue was adopted from the founder of the Mt. Lebanon Cemetery in Collingsdale, Pennsylvania, and the synagogue’s primary benefactor, Menashe Abrams."

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ

Searching: RATOWSKY / CHAIMSON (Ariogala / Ragola, Lith.)
WALTZMAN / WALZMAN (Ustrzyki Dolne / Istryker, Pol.)
LEVY (Tyrawa Woloska, Pol.)
LEFFENFELD / LEFENFELD (Daliowa/ Posada Jasliska, Pol.)
BOJDA (Tarnobrzeg, Pol.)
SOKALSKY / SOLON FINGER(MAN) (Grodek, Bialystok, Pol.)
BOBISH / APPEL (Odessa)


Re: Burial Society Washington Cemetery - Bnai Menasse or Menasche #usa

Moishe Miller
 

Hi,
 
The JGS of NY maintains a webpage that has a lot of information on local societies. See: 
 
Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
JGFF# 3391


Re: Where did the term Galitziana come from? #general

Daniel Bargman
 

IT's not a coincidence:  both places, spanish Galicia and polish Galitzia were inhabitated by Celtic tribes  in the past, with the root GAL as an  ethnic marker, see also: PortuGAL, Galia (latin for France), Gales (Spanish for Wales), Gaelic/ Irish language and so on


Burial Society Washington Cemetery - Bnai Menasse or Menasche #usa

Alan Reische
 

I've finally penetrated my g/grandfather's burial information at Washington; he was listed under the Surname 'Lisk'.

Anyway, the very helpful man I spoke to said that both his burial plot and the plot of his son Joseph was administered by B'Nai Menasse or Menasche, which his records show subsequently was absorbed by Nachlas Zwie Linas Hasedke. Are these names familiar to any Genners? What region or shtetl does the original congregation or society relate to? I have run them through the burial society database and Google generally with no results except for the Indian Jews, which does not relate to my search, and a reference to a then- existing (1902) congregation at 89 Ridge Street. My g/grandfather and family originally lived on Ridge Street, so there is a strong tie..


Re: Housing Family Trees for FREE #general

JPmiaou@...
 

Jeff Malka wrote:
I remember looking up some prominent Jewish individuals and to my surprise
retrieved their 'baptismal dates'.
Huh? Where and when was this? All iterations of the FamilySearch website that I've dealt with over the past decade have (carefully) not shown any LDS-specific data, such as posthumous rites, to non-LDS.

Barbara Sloan wrote:
I would not and do not house my family tree online anywhere, because I believe in privacy.
I agree that living people do not belong on online trees, anywhere, but the dead neither have nor need privacy.

Julia
./\ /\
.>*.*<


Re: Why would my Grandfather travel under his older brother's name? #names

segslusky@...
 

One might think one could resolve these questions if one could only ask the grandparent, but no.  I was already researching in the 70s and had my grandmother’s 1913 ship manifest while she was still alive. Her Jewish name was Sosha Riva. But on the ship manifest she was listed as Reise. I asked her why and she was embarrassed and said she had thought it would be a nicer name for America. Now much later I’ve realized that it was probably her older sister Rose’s Jewish name. Rose had already come to the US by the time my grandmother came. Too late to get to the bottom of this now. 


Susan Slusky


Re: Jews in Mohacs #hungary

JPmiaou@...
 

FamilySearch has some records from the Mohács Jewish congregation between 1850 and 1895: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/243654

They also have Mohács civil registers from 1895 to 1921: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/775709

Julia
./\ /\
.>*.*<


Re: Partial solution found to transcribing audio or video memoirs / testimonies #translation

Emily Rosenberg
 

Thank you so much for these two pathways. For recording histories now The Jewish Women’s Archive (jwa.org) has developed an app called Story Aperture which gives interview prompts and a platform for recording and storing. Seems it would be a great inter-generational project to do remotely during quarantine. I can even imagine siblings interviewing each other to leave a record for future generations u


Re: Viewmate - US Naturalization Index care - what info on it? #records

Shelley Mitchell
 

In my opinion, the most important document is the Petition. It enumerates the vital information like date and place of birth, date of arrival, name and date of birth of spouse and children. 


Re: Searching records in New Haven, Connecticut #records

ms nodrog
 

Try the Jewish Historical Society of Greater New Haven.  Their email used to be  http://jhsgnh.org/

I am originally from New Haven.

Good Luck with your search,
Hannah Gordon



Re: Brick wall: FRIEDSON'S, AISENBERG'S and SAMURIN'S from western Massachusetts #usa

Susan&David
 

Bob:  The Jewish Heritage Center, American Ancestors (New England Historic Genealogical Society) has, among its holdings, a number of archival synagogue records.  Included is a synagogue from Gardner, MA, Cong. Ohave Sholom.
 http://digitalcollections.americanancestors.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15869coll3

David Rosen
Boston, MA


On 8/4/2020 9:06 AM, Bob Silverstein wrote:
Hi Ellen and Carol,

Thanks for your inputs.  The jgsgb site has good information.  It has a history of Jews in Massachusetts that elaborates on Ellen's comment.  It also cites the book Water Street by Norma Feingold.  I requested it from my library.

The synagogue list is useful because it points to where records may now exist.  I hope not too much has changed since it was published.  Athol does have a synagogue going back to the 1920's and I contacted them already.

Once again, many thanks for the leads,
Bob


Danzig Meeting August 12 at IAJGS Virtual Conference #danzig #gdansk #poland #germany

Logan Kleinwaks
 

The JewishGen Danzig/Gdańsk Research Division will have a free online meeting on Wednesday, August 12, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Eastern Time U.S. (New York), as part of the IAJGS Conference that was planned to be in San Diego but will now be held entirely online. To attend this free meeting, you must first register for the conference at https://s4.goeshow.com/iajgs/annual/2020/registration_form.cfm. There is an option for "free limited access," which enables you to attend the Danzig meeting, other SIG/BOF meetings, and the JewishGen Annual Meeting at no cost (but most conference presentations are not available to free attendees).
 
After you register on the IAJGS Conference website, please also fill out the form at https://forms.gle/LFrCHVbZwNfcX1mb9, which will let me know about your research interests. Note: filling out this Google form is not registration, you must register on the IAJGS Conference website in order to attend.
 
The IAJGS has generously allowed us to offer this meeting for free, with the understanding that it will not be a formal presentation, but an informal networking session. Discussion will revolve around our current projects/volunteer opportunities and your personal research. Please come prepared to chat about your Danzig research interests (e.g., surnames, records). You do not need to have a webcam or microphone on your computer, there will be a text chat option. You will receive further instructions about how to join the meeting.
 
Meeting time on Wednesday, August 12: New York 4-5 PM, Los Angeles 1-2 PM, London 9-10 PM, Gdańsk 10-11 PM, Jerusalem 11 PM-12 AM, Sydney 6-7 AM (Aug 13)
 
If you have any questions, please email me directly.

Logan Kleinwaks
JewishGen Research Director for Danzig
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.
 


Re: Where did the term Galitziana come from? #general

rv Kaplan
 

Think it's just coincidence that there are 2 areas in Europe with similar names.  Galicia was Austrian Poland  in the past and the name would come from German, probably.  In Yiddish, our ancestors would have been Galitzianers.

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
TROPP, STORCH - Kolbuszowa, Cmolas - Galicia

On Tue, 4 Aug 2020 at 14:46, Alan Tapper via groups.jewishgen.org <sabaalan=ymail.com@...> wrote:
Question to al,

I am very much aware of the differences between Litvaks and Galitzianas but my question really questions where and how did the term Galitziana come from?  I ask this because about 18 years ago I was touring In Northern Portugal and we decided to cross the border into Spain.  My wife at that tome spoke fluent Castllian Spanish.  The Provence in Spain just to the north of Portugal is called Galicia.  I wonder if many years ago it was the Sephardim who were referred to as Gslitianas because of the Provence.  By the way the people of Galicia have their own dialect as they do not speak Castilian Spanish either.  They had to bring a translator over who spoke Spanish as we know it so that we could order at a restaurant
Alan Tapper


Re: Liffmann, Leiffmann #names

Reuven Mohr
 

it is not clear if you refer to some other thread, of if your query is standing alone. You don't mention any specific location. The last name Liffmann/Leiffmann can often be based on the first name Liebmann/Lipmann/Lifmann, which is a German version like Leizer of the Hebrew Eliezer/Elazar and sometimes other Hebrew names (Yedidya etc.)
In this case the name has nothing to do with the status of Levy.
 


Re: Seeking descendants of Masya Ginda Rakovschik from Minsk Belarus #belarus

Gerald and Margaret
 

Why don't you contact an British/Belarussian charity, the Together Plan ,which is helping people in the remaining Jewish communities to become self-sufficient.  One of their many projects is to carry out research for people seeking info about their roots in Belarus.  They will visit cemeteries and official archives, etc on your behalf.  
Contact info@...

'The Together Plan'

Good luck ,

Margaret Levin
London UK


Where did the term Galitziana come from? #general

Alan Tapper
 

Question to al,

I am very much aware of the differences between Litvaks and Galitzianas but my question really questions where and how did the term Galitziana come from?  I ask this because about 18 years ago I was touring In Northern Portugal and we decided to cross the border into Spain.  My wife at that tome spoke fluent Castllian Spanish.  The Provence in Spain just to the north of Portugal is called Galicia.  I wonder if many years ago it was the Sephardim who were referred to as Gslitianas because of the Provence.  By the way the people of Galicia have their own dialect as they do not speak Castilian Spanish either.  They had to bring a translator over who spoke Spanish as we know it so that we could order at a restaurant
Alan Tapper