Date   

Prayers for safety #general

Rachelle <rlberliner@...>
 

Perhaps this post is an abstract relationship to Jewish genealogy. I was
able to locate a newly-found cousin who was a resident of New Orleans
through another member of his family and my thoughts went to all the Jewish
families who may not have been able to locate theirs. Thus, it is
my thought that today's Jewishgenners are the descendants of those we search
for so diligently >from our pasts, trying to obtain original locations,
names, and information about our ascendants. Some of our own genners, as
well as their ascendants could possibly be missing or lost during the
tragedy of hurricane Katrina.

With that thought in mind, I would like to direct this message to our
Jewishgenners >from New Orleans, other locations in LA, and Mississippi,
"We pray you were able to get to a safe place and that your lives can soon
be restored to normal."

We send you love and best wishes for overcoming this unforseen devastation.

Sincerely,
Rachelle & Sam Berliner
Savannah, GA

MODERATOR NOTE: As an update to a previous note, we are pleased to
announce that Susan Bergman Meehan's son is safe and out of Louisiana.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Prayers for safety #general

Rachelle <rlberliner@...>
 

Perhaps this post is an abstract relationship to Jewish genealogy. I was
able to locate a newly-found cousin who was a resident of New Orleans
through another member of his family and my thoughts went to all the Jewish
families who may not have been able to locate theirs. Thus, it is
my thought that today's Jewishgenners are the descendants of those we search
for so diligently >from our pasts, trying to obtain original locations,
names, and information about our ascendants. Some of our own genners, as
well as their ascendants could possibly be missing or lost during the
tragedy of hurricane Katrina.

With that thought in mind, I would like to direct this message to our
Jewishgenners >from New Orleans, other locations in LA, and Mississippi,
"We pray you were able to get to a safe place and that your lives can soon
be restored to normal."

We send you love and best wishes for overcoming this unforseen devastation.

Sincerely,
Rachelle & Sam Berliner
Savannah, GA

MODERATOR NOTE: As an update to a previous note, we are pleased to
announce that Susan Bergman Meehan's son is safe and out of Louisiana.


Research Trip- Czech Republic, CNK, Books #austria-czech

Gabriela Svatos
 

Last week Linda Rakoff and I headed north >from Bratislava to Prague (about
400ks) to continue our research. The trip took about 5hrs. (included a 45
minute lunch stop in Moravia.). The bus dropped us off at Florenc
bus/subway station where they thankfully have a baggage storage room, and
you can also purchase public transit passes for 1,3,7, or 14 days. My one
week pass cost 280kc (about $14CDN). This pass has to be validated the
first time you enter the transit system, and then you carry it with you as a
proof of payment just in case the controllers check you. The penalties are
stiff you you get caught without paying, but I am not sure of the exact
amounts. >from Florenc station you can take buses all over Europe. An
express bus to Wien (air-conditioned, WC, free coffee etc) costs 550kc.
They have two stops-one to Wien downtown, and the other at the airport.

We visited the Czech National Library which is fantastically beautiful, and
the people are so helpful. It is right near the Staromestske Namesti subway
stop. A one month library card costs 20kc (about $1CDN). We used passports
for ID, and the whole registration process took only a few minutes. Books
can be looked up in their electronic catalogue. You have to fill in request
slips and deposit them into a bin. It takes about two hours for the books to
be brought down to the studovna (reading room). This wait is no great
suffering, as right in the library complex, there is an internet cafe and
several student restaurants where the food is inexpensive (unlike the rest
of Stare Mesto) and the coffee is delicious. The scenery is wonderful with
many interesting art installations throughout the courtyards. There is also
a bag check room (no charge) where you leave your backpacks, and belongings.

We found many city directories >from the 1920's and 30's. These can be
tricky to search, as not all of them have alphabetical listings by surname.
For some towns you have to know the name of the industry in Czech/Slovak, or
the person's profession, or their street address. Some books have all
kinds of cross-indices making the research much less tedious. Some of the
directories are more like yellow pages with photos, and advertising.

Here are a few examples >from the 1937 Nakupny Poradca (Shopping Advisor). I
have selected some surnames which appear on this SIG:

1)VLADAR, Albert, Zilina, Srobarov sad 13, Pansky Krajcir (tailor)

2)JAKUBOVITS, Herman, Stefanikova 11, Tel: 48, velkoobchodnik pivom a vinom
(wholesaler-beer/wine)

3) GLASEL, Arpad, Dr. (pravotar) lawyer, Zilina, Jana Milca 5, Tel: 182

4) HONIGWACHS and Co (Honey?)-velkoobchod. kratkym a pletenym tov. ,
Legionarska u. 25,tel: 2974 Grosse Auswahl in Socken, strumpfen, Westen,..

5) VENETIANER, Ferdinand (predtym I Kramer, Presov), Kosicka c 39-41,
Obchod. drevom, stavebnym a stolarskym materialom (Wood and building
supplies)

Here are some of the other books found in the CNK (library) catalogues which
we could not find to purchase anywhere, but at least they have exemplars to
study in the reading room, or at the archives:

1) Zydowskie zabytki Cieszyna i Czeskiego Czieszyna, publ, 1999, contains
name lists
2) Zidowske Matriky HBM 1784-1949 (Lenka Matusikova, editor), publ. 1999
3) Zidovske obce na Kladensku a Slansku (Blanka Rozkosna), publ 2000
4) Zidovske Pamatky Tachovska (Jiri Fidler), publ 1998
5) Zidovsky Hrbitov v Boskovicich (Jaroslav Achab Haidler), publ 2002
6) Dotyky: Zide v Dejinach Jihlavska, publ 1998-contains deportation lists
7) Lide ghetta: postavy a postavicky zidovske Kromerize (Max Grunfeld), publ
2000
8) Sbornik z historie zidu na Kolinsku (Zuzana Miskovska), publ 1992

In addition we found some of Linda's ASCHNER relatives (Viennese branch),
who were deported to Terezin, listed in a new Czech publication (2005)which
lists business which were aryanized. This book fortunately contains several
name indices as well as a searchable CD database. We were unable to find
anything of this scope for Slovakia, but I was told that something like this
is being published there also.

Title: Arizace a arizatori
Authors: Jancik, Drahomir and Kubu, Eduard
ISBN: 80-246-1000-0

The Czech National Archive which published the 1973 [MODERATOR NOTE: I
believe this is a typo - should be 1793] jewish census is near
the Hradcanska metro stop. You cross the road, and walk about 200 up the
hill, and the building is right on the main street (133 Milady Horakove).
The Prague (1793 ) segment has been delayed, but it will hopefully be
released by December 2005. They have also published earlier censuses (sp?)
which list residents by religion. Most regions have now been sold out, but
they still have copies of "Soupis poddanych podle viry z roku 1651" for
Plzensko-Klatovsko. This is actually a two volume set.

More to follow,
Gabi

Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Research Trip- Czech Republic, CNK, Books #austria-czech

Gabriela Svatos
 

Last week Linda Rakoff and I headed north >from Bratislava to Prague (about
400ks) to continue our research. The trip took about 5hrs. (included a 45
minute lunch stop in Moravia.). The bus dropped us off at Florenc
bus/subway station where they thankfully have a baggage storage room, and
you can also purchase public transit passes for 1,3,7, or 14 days. My one
week pass cost 280kc (about $14CDN). This pass has to be validated the
first time you enter the transit system, and then you carry it with you as a
proof of payment just in case the controllers check you. The penalties are
stiff you you get caught without paying, but I am not sure of the exact
amounts. >from Florenc station you can take buses all over Europe. An
express bus to Wien (air-conditioned, WC, free coffee etc) costs 550kc.
They have two stops-one to Wien downtown, and the other at the airport.

We visited the Czech National Library which is fantastically beautiful, and
the people are so helpful. It is right near the Staromestske Namesti subway
stop. A one month library card costs 20kc (about $1CDN). We used passports
for ID, and the whole registration process took only a few minutes. Books
can be looked up in their electronic catalogue. You have to fill in request
slips and deposit them into a bin. It takes about two hours for the books to
be brought down to the studovna (reading room). This wait is no great
suffering, as right in the library complex, there is an internet cafe and
several student restaurants where the food is inexpensive (unlike the rest
of Stare Mesto) and the coffee is delicious. The scenery is wonderful with
many interesting art installations throughout the courtyards. There is also
a bag check room (no charge) where you leave your backpacks, and belongings.

We found many city directories >from the 1920's and 30's. These can be
tricky to search, as not all of them have alphabetical listings by surname.
For some towns you have to know the name of the industry in Czech/Slovak, or
the person's profession, or their street address. Some books have all
kinds of cross-indices making the research much less tedious. Some of the
directories are more like yellow pages with photos, and advertising.

Here are a few examples >from the 1937 Nakupny Poradca (Shopping Advisor). I
have selected some surnames which appear on this SIG:

1)VLADAR, Albert, Zilina, Srobarov sad 13, Pansky Krajcir (tailor)

2)JAKUBOVITS, Herman, Stefanikova 11, Tel: 48, velkoobchodnik pivom a vinom
(wholesaler-beer/wine)

3) GLASEL, Arpad, Dr. (pravotar) lawyer, Zilina, Jana Milca 5, Tel: 182

4) HONIGWACHS and Co (Honey?)-velkoobchod. kratkym a pletenym tov. ,
Legionarska u. 25,tel: 2974 Grosse Auswahl in Socken, strumpfen, Westen,..

5) VENETIANER, Ferdinand (predtym I Kramer, Presov), Kosicka c 39-41,
Obchod. drevom, stavebnym a stolarskym materialom (Wood and building
supplies)

Here are some of the other books found in the CNK (library) catalogues which
we could not find to purchase anywhere, but at least they have exemplars to
study in the reading room, or at the archives:

1) Zydowskie zabytki Cieszyna i Czeskiego Czieszyna, publ, 1999, contains
name lists
2) Zidowske Matriky HBM 1784-1949 (Lenka Matusikova, editor), publ. 1999
3) Zidovske obce na Kladensku a Slansku (Blanka Rozkosna), publ 2000
4) Zidovske Pamatky Tachovska (Jiri Fidler), publ 1998
5) Zidovsky Hrbitov v Boskovicich (Jaroslav Achab Haidler), publ 2002
6) Dotyky: Zide v Dejinach Jihlavska, publ 1998-contains deportation lists
7) Lide ghetta: postavy a postavicky zidovske Kromerize (Max Grunfeld), publ
2000
8) Sbornik z historie zidu na Kolinsku (Zuzana Miskovska), publ 1992

In addition we found some of Linda's ASCHNER relatives (Viennese branch),
who were deported to Terezin, listed in a new Czech publication (2005)which
lists business which were aryanized. This book fortunately contains several
name indices as well as a searchable CD database. We were unable to find
anything of this scope for Slovakia, but I was told that something like this
is being published there also.

Title: Arizace a arizatori
Authors: Jancik, Drahomir and Kubu, Eduard
ISBN: 80-246-1000-0

The Czech National Archive which published the 1973 [MODERATOR NOTE: I
believe this is a typo - should be 1793] jewish census is near
the Hradcanska metro stop. You cross the road, and walk about 200 up the
hill, and the building is right on the main street (133 Milady Horakove).
The Prague (1793 ) segment has been delayed, but it will hopefully be
released by December 2005. They have also published earlier censuses (sp?)
which list residents by religion. Most regions have now been sold out, but
they still have copies of "Soupis poddanych podle viry z roku 1651" for
Plzensko-Klatovsko. This is actually a two volume set.

More to follow,
Gabi

Gabriela Svatos
Richmond Hill, Ontario


"Emigration House" Opens in Bremerhaven #germany

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a story of interest to researchers in today's New York Times about
emigration >from the port of Bremerhaven, and a new museum, known in German
as Deutsches Auswanderer Haus--or "Emigration House"--which opened in that
city a few weeks ago. The story can be read at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/international/europe/02bremerhaven.html

This museum tells the flip side of the experiences detailed at New York's
Ellis Island Museum--the departure of our ancestors to a new, unknown world,
versus their arrival in a strange land. And in this case, they were not
just heading to New York, but to ports in Canada, Brazil, Argentina and
Australia. Although Hamburg has been planning an emigration museum for years
(now scheduled to open in 2007), Bremerhaven's is the first to open in
Europe. You can learn more about it on the website:

http://www.dah-bremerhaven.de/english/hauptseite.html

It is interesting to note that Bremerhaven came into existence as a major
port to accommodate the overflow demand on the port of Hamburg, and its
prominence was due to efforts of one man, a Jew named Albert Ballin, who
took over the operations of his father's ticket-booking service and
eventually became general director of HAPAG, which is still one of Europe's
biggest shipping companies.

The complex he also built in Hamburg, on an island in the middle of the Elbe
River once held over 30 buildings, including dormitories, a bathhouse, and a
synagogue where housed people during their layovers between arriving in
Germany and departing for various ports.

The new Bremerhaven Auswanderer Haus is currently simulating the immigrant
experience for visitors, and introducing them to a specific immigrant by
providing a magnetic card with the story of one specific person, and
detailing each person's life story. On their website you can take a virtual
"tour" of the museum, and if you visit in person, they appear to have a
computer center called "forum migration" where you can use their database
and archives to "research your ancestors and discover the meaning of your
family's name." There does not appear to be any online research available
on the museum's website.

Also of interest might be the German Emigrants Database at the Historisches
Museum Bremerhaven at:

http://www.historisches-museum-bremerhaven.de/index.php?id=128

which contains information on emigrants who left Europe for the United
States of America between 1820 and 1939, primarily >from German ports, taken
from passenger manifests.
This new museum might be a destination one might want to add to a European
itinerary to gain another perspective into our ancestors' emigration
experience.

Pamela Weisberger Santa Monica, CA pweisberger@...


German SIG #Germany "Emigration House" Opens in Bremerhaven #germany

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

There's a story of interest to researchers in today's New York Times about
emigration >from the port of Bremerhaven, and a new museum, known in German
as Deutsches Auswanderer Haus--or "Emigration House"--which opened in that
city a few weeks ago. The story can be read at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/international/europe/02bremerhaven.html

This museum tells the flip side of the experiences detailed at New York's
Ellis Island Museum--the departure of our ancestors to a new, unknown world,
versus their arrival in a strange land. And in this case, they were not
just heading to New York, but to ports in Canada, Brazil, Argentina and
Australia. Although Hamburg has been planning an emigration museum for years
(now scheduled to open in 2007), Bremerhaven's is the first to open in
Europe. You can learn more about it on the website:

http://www.dah-bremerhaven.de/english/hauptseite.html

It is interesting to note that Bremerhaven came into existence as a major
port to accommodate the overflow demand on the port of Hamburg, and its
prominence was due to efforts of one man, a Jew named Albert Ballin, who
took over the operations of his father's ticket-booking service and
eventually became general director of HAPAG, which is still one of Europe's
biggest shipping companies.

The complex he also built in Hamburg, on an island in the middle of the Elbe
River once held over 30 buildings, including dormitories, a bathhouse, and a
synagogue where housed people during their layovers between arriving in
Germany and departing for various ports.

The new Bremerhaven Auswanderer Haus is currently simulating the immigrant
experience for visitors, and introducing them to a specific immigrant by
providing a magnetic card with the story of one specific person, and
detailing each person's life story. On their website you can take a virtual
"tour" of the museum, and if you visit in person, they appear to have a
computer center called "forum migration" where you can use their database
and archives to "research your ancestors and discover the meaning of your
family's name." There does not appear to be any online research available
on the museum's website.

Also of interest might be the German Emigrants Database at the Historisches
Museum Bremerhaven at:

http://www.historisches-museum-bremerhaven.de/index.php?id=128

which contains information on emigrants who left Europe for the United
States of America between 1820 and 1939, primarily >from German ports, taken
from passenger manifests.
This new museum might be a destination one might want to add to a European
itinerary to gain another perspective into our ancestors' emigration
experience.

Pamela Weisberger Santa Monica, CA pweisberger@...


Katrina's wrath.... #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear fellow FrenchSIGgers,

Among the many who are affected by the devastation wrought by Katrina,
is our own FrenchSIG Webmaster, Carol Levy Monahan, of Metairie, LA

When I heard >from her last she and her sister had made it safely to New
Iberia, LA, but were dreading what they would find when able to return
to their home area again.

Our prayers go out to Carol, her family and all of the thousands and
thousands who are so terribly affected by this terrible event.

Rosanne and Pierre
You Co-Coordinators


French SIG #France Katrina's wrath.... #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

Dear fellow FrenchSIGgers,

Among the many who are affected by the devastation wrought by Katrina,
is our own FrenchSIG Webmaster, Carol Levy Monahan, of Metairie, LA

When I heard >from her last she and her sister had made it safely to New
Iberia, LA, but were dreading what they would find when able to return
to their home area again.

Our prayers go out to Carol, her family and all of the thousands and
thousands who are so terribly affected by this terrible event.

Rosanne and Pierre
You Co-Coordinators


Re: ytandv digest: September 01, 2005 #yiddish

mark
 

Dear genners.
Maybe somebody is searching yiddish writers in prewar Poland, Particulary
AKSELROD, WARSAWSKI and WAJSENBERG?
Wajsenberg Mark
mark306@...


Vaudeville #yiddish

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Kerry Kendall writes: I am trying to find out about my
gt-grandmother Sarah (Sadie) JACOBS it is believed
that she was in Vaudeville or at least on the stage of
some kind as a young woman. As the family lived in
London we can only presume that this is where she was
on the stage. Sarah was born 1892 and her parents
where Benjamin JACOBS b. 1873 and Elizabeth ABRAHAMS
b. Circa. 1873 married 15/03/1892.

I wonder if Kerry has found this JACOBS family in the
England and Wales census of 1901?

Sarah's father was a market porter and her mother was
a tailoress. I am interested in Sarah's mother
Elizabeth ABRAHAMS because my husband's gt-grandfather
was Abraham ABRAHAMS - also a London tailor and we
have never found out anything about his early roots.
He was born in London in 1829 and died in 1911. Of
course ABRAHAMS is a common name but there is always a
chance of a link.

Here is the JACOBS family of 27 Brunswick Buildings,
Goulston St. Whitechapel, London in 1901.

Benjamin born abt 1873 London Head
Elizabeth born abt 1873 London, Wife
Sarah born abt 1892 London, Daughter
Abraham born abt 1895 London, Son

What is exciting is that you can find Benjamin JACOBS
as one of seven brothers in the 1881 census: the son
of Abraham [a fruit trader] and Ester JACOBS, both
born in London in 1825 and 1828 respectively.

You can also find parents Abraham [costermonger] and
Ester JACOBS in the 1871 census with other children
who must have left home by 1881. Benjamin [and
obviously his daughter, Sarah] was part of a very
large London family.

I have also tracked Sarah's mother, Elizabeth nee
ABRAHAMS and there are two possible London families
she could have come from.

Sarah obviously came >from a very old-established
cockney family [perhaps Sephardic in origin?] and this
was the perfect background for the London vaudeville
actresses of the Edwardian and Victorian era.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Moderator's Note: Thank you Celia for helping to make this connection
for Kerry Kendall.


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Re: ytandv digest: September 01, 2005 #yiddish

mark
 

Dear genners.
Maybe somebody is searching yiddish writers in prewar Poland, Particulary
AKSELROD, WARSAWSKI and WAJSENBERG?
Wajsenberg Mark
mark306@...


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Vaudeville #yiddish

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Kerry Kendall writes: I am trying to find out about my
gt-grandmother Sarah (Sadie) JACOBS it is believed
that she was in Vaudeville or at least on the stage of
some kind as a young woman. As the family lived in
London we can only presume that this is where she was
on the stage. Sarah was born 1892 and her parents
where Benjamin JACOBS b. 1873 and Elizabeth ABRAHAMS
b. Circa. 1873 married 15/03/1892.

I wonder if Kerry has found this JACOBS family in the
England and Wales census of 1901?

Sarah's father was a market porter and her mother was
a tailoress. I am interested in Sarah's mother
Elizabeth ABRAHAMS because my husband's gt-grandfather
was Abraham ABRAHAMS - also a London tailor and we
have never found out anything about his early roots.
He was born in London in 1829 and died in 1911. Of
course ABRAHAMS is a common name but there is always a
chance of a link.

Here is the JACOBS family of 27 Brunswick Buildings,
Goulston St. Whitechapel, London in 1901.

Benjamin born abt 1873 London Head
Elizabeth born abt 1873 London, Wife
Sarah born abt 1892 London, Daughter
Abraham born abt 1895 London, Son

What is exciting is that you can find Benjamin JACOBS
as one of seven brothers in the 1881 census: the son
of Abraham [a fruit trader] and Ester JACOBS, both
born in London in 1825 and 1828 respectively.

You can also find parents Abraham [costermonger] and
Ester JACOBS in the 1871 census with other children
who must have left home by 1881. Benjamin [and
obviously his daughter, Sarah] was part of a very
large London family.

I have also tracked Sarah's mother, Elizabeth nee
ABRAHAMS and there are two possible London families
she could have come from.

Sarah obviously came >from a very old-established
cockney family [perhaps Sephardic in origin?] and this
was the perfect background for the London vaudeville
actresses of the Edwardian and Victorian era.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Moderator's Note: Thank you Celia for helping to make this connection
for Kerry Kendall.


Help With Finding Obits in Moorpark (Ventora Co.), CA: LIPNER Murray #general

arnonh <arnonh@...>
 

Hello, Dear Colleagues!

I'm still continuing my search for the LIPNERs originally in NYC, and
had some great progress, thank to some dear colleagues.

I need some help in finding the obit (if exists at all) of:

* Murray LIPNER (23 Oct 1922 - 14 May 1990, Moorpark, Ventura Co., CA),
SSN: 092-16-9027;

I hope to find there some connection to the information I've already got
and some clues as for his descendants.

Thanks in advance,
Arnon Hershkovitz, Israel
arnonh@...

Researching:
HERSHKOVITZ: Galati, Romania -> Israel (1882), some left to the USA,France, SA,
Australia; JACOBSON: Pinsk, Belarus -> Israel (1880s); GOLDBERG: ? ->Jerusalem
(1st mid 19th cen.), some left to USA, Paris; LIBMAN: Kuzmin & Krasilov,Ukraine
(Volhynia Gub.) -> Israel (1920s); SCHREIER: Orinin, Ukraine (Podolia Gub.) ->
Israel (1920s), Russia, USA; TROP: Vilnius, Lithuania -> Israel (mid19th century);
BRUMBERG: Kuzmin, Ukraine (Volhynia Gub.) -> Cuba, USA (1900s);


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help With Finding Obits in Moorpark (Ventora Co.), CA: LIPNER Murray #general

arnonh <arnonh@...>
 

Hello, Dear Colleagues!

I'm still continuing my search for the LIPNERs originally in NYC, and
had some great progress, thank to some dear colleagues.

I need some help in finding the obit (if exists at all) of:

* Murray LIPNER (23 Oct 1922 - 14 May 1990, Moorpark, Ventura Co., CA),
SSN: 092-16-9027;

I hope to find there some connection to the information I've already got
and some clues as for his descendants.

Thanks in advance,
Arnon Hershkovitz, Israel
arnonh@...

Researching:
HERSHKOVITZ: Galati, Romania -> Israel (1882), some left to the USA,France, SA,
Australia; JACOBSON: Pinsk, Belarus -> Israel (1880s); GOLDBERG: ? ->Jerusalem
(1st mid 19th cen.), some left to USA, Paris; LIBMAN: Kuzmin & Krasilov,Ukraine
(Volhynia Gub.) -> Israel (1920s); SCHREIER: Orinin, Ukraine (Podolia Gub.) ->
Israel (1920s), Russia, USA; TROP: Vilnius, Lithuania -> Israel (mid19th century);
BRUMBERG: Kuzmin, Ukraine (Volhynia Gub.) -> Cuba, USA (1900s);


Jacob and Vicki KARNO relocated to Destin, Florida #general

Eileen Polakoff <eileenpolakoff@...>
 

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I've just heard >from Vicki and they are fine. They had a front row seat to
Hurricane Katrina but managed to get out of New Orleans to avoid the
devastation that followed. They have relocated to Destin for at least 2 or 3
months where they are renting an apartment. Their friends are pleased to
hear they are fine and as Vicki says "we'll survive" as we all know is the
hope for everyone on the Gulf Coast.

Some of you may not know that JewishGen's president and founder Susan King
called New Orleans home for a very long time. I don't know if any family are
still living there but they certainly must be. I do know that her heart is
hurting as she sees the devastation everywhere in her hometown.

Two of my colleagues >from the world of professional genealogy have missing
family members. Professional genealogist Jane Aprill, also a member of the
JGS of New Orleans, reports her doctor husband is missing. He stayed in NO
during the hurricane to help keep medical facilities open and functioning.
And John and Barbara Wylie, professional genealogists >from Houston, have not
heard >from their 35 year old son Joe since Monday right after the storm.
There are certainly others >from the wide world of genealogists who are in
similar or worse circumstances. We are all praying for them and that they
are all found safe soon.

My prayers are with everyone in America today as this devastation hits all
of us.

Eileen Polakoff

MODERATOR NOTE: Last night genner Susan Bergman Meehan reported that her
son had been helping his New Orleans neighbors to safety, but had not been
heard >from afterward. Please keep them in your thoughts as well.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jacob and Vicki KARNO relocated to Destin, Florida #general

Eileen Polakoff <eileenpolakoff@...>
 

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I've just heard >from Vicki and they are fine. They had a front row seat to
Hurricane Katrina but managed to get out of New Orleans to avoid the
devastation that followed. They have relocated to Destin for at least 2 or 3
months where they are renting an apartment. Their friends are pleased to
hear they are fine and as Vicki says "we'll survive" as we all know is the
hope for everyone on the Gulf Coast.

Some of you may not know that JewishGen's president and founder Susan King
called New Orleans home for a very long time. I don't know if any family are
still living there but they certainly must be. I do know that her heart is
hurting as she sees the devastation everywhere in her hometown.

Two of my colleagues >from the world of professional genealogy have missing
family members. Professional genealogist Jane Aprill, also a member of the
JGS of New Orleans, reports her doctor husband is missing. He stayed in NO
during the hurricane to help keep medical facilities open and functioning.
And John and Barbara Wylie, professional genealogists >from Houston, have not
heard >from their 35 year old son Joe since Monday right after the storm.
There are certainly others >from the wide world of genealogists who are in
similar or worse circumstances. We are all praying for them and that they
are all found safe soon.

My prayers are with everyone in America today as this devastation hits all
of us.

Eileen Polakoff

MODERATOR NOTE: Last night genner Susan Bergman Meehan reported that her
son had been helping his New Orleans neighbors to safety, but had not been
heard >from afterward. Please keep them in your thoughts as well.


Simon Segal #unitedkingdom

elisabeth segal <darla1504@...>
 

My husband has been given the name of a village outside Warsaw in Poland.
This cannot be the right spelling as the village was called Mogalids. That
is the only spelling his cousin Hymie knows. He is trying to trace Segal
family. His grandfather Simon Segal was born in this village. He is
believed to have come to the U.K. to live at the end of the 19th century. He
was married and his first wife died in Poland (age unknown).
Simon married again, apparently his wife's sister. (name unknown). Second
wife had three children, Louis, Sarah and Jack. Jack was the only child born
in this country. Louis married Leah and had three daughters, Betty, Frieda
and Stella. Sarah married Samuel Rosenberg. They had two sons, Harvey and
Anthony (my husband). Contact has been lost with all family members, except
his brother Harvey and cousin Hymie. We understand that most of the family
left in Poland did perish in the Holocast. But we have no way of tracing
this. Can someone please make sense of the village name. Or does anyone know
of any decendants of the above.
Thank you all so much.
regards

Elisabeth
U.K. (Essex)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Simon Segal #unitedkingdom

elisabeth segal <darla1504@...>
 

My husband has been given the name of a village outside Warsaw in Poland.
This cannot be the right spelling as the village was called Mogalids. That
is the only spelling his cousin Hymie knows. He is trying to trace Segal
family. His grandfather Simon Segal was born in this village. He is
believed to have come to the U.K. to live at the end of the 19th century. He
was married and his first wife died in Poland (age unknown).
Simon married again, apparently his wife's sister. (name unknown). Second
wife had three children, Louis, Sarah and Jack. Jack was the only child born
in this country. Louis married Leah and had three daughters, Betty, Frieda
and Stella. Sarah married Samuel Rosenberg. They had two sons, Harvey and
Anthony (my husband). Contact has been lost with all family members, except
his brother Harvey and cousin Hymie. We understand that most of the family
left in Poland did perish in the Holocast. But we have no way of tracing
this. Can someone please make sense of the village name. Or does anyone know
of any decendants of the above.
Thank you all so much.
regards

Elisabeth
U.K. (Essex)


Re: jcr-uk digest: August 22, 2005 - SWANSEA #unitedkingdom

Hazel Dakers
 

Robert and the list

Sorry for the belated reply. I knew at the back of my mind I had checked out
Swansea for the possibility of some of my early family coming >from there
and have now found a note in my files:

The Jews of South Wales:historical studies. Cardiff: University of Wales
Press 1993. Ursula Henriques is the editor and wrote a number of the
chapters.

The first known settled community (as opposed to visiting pedlars and a
few individual residents) was in the third quarter of the eighteenth
century in Swansea - then a flourishing seaport.

There were quite a few pawnborkers there, one of whom was Greenbone Jacobs
of Swansea who was accused in the 1868 Midsummer Quarter Sessions of
receiving stolen rope p.81). He was born in 1796 and Michael Jacobs (late
C19th was probably descended >from him).

Swansea was an older Jewish community than that of Cardiff. According to a
reference (NH Saunders Swansea Hebrew Congregation 1830-1980, Centenary
pamphlet 1980, 209 - apparently not in British Library collection) the
lease of the first Swansea congregation dates back to 1768.

I then followed up and arranged for some research to be undertaken for me by
the local archives http://www.swansea.gov.uk/westglamorganarchives/ who were
very helpful.

Regards
Hazel Dakers, London UK

Researching: NORDEN (London & South Africa); HEIMANN (Luegde, Germany and
South Africa); GOLD (Zgierz and Lodz, Poland), BIRNBAUM (Zgierz and Lodz,
Poland)
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ABRAHAMs in Wales
From: "robert fraser" <robertandginafraser@...>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2005 09:15:34 +0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi guys -

I seems unlikely to me that a rural area such as Llangyfelach (although
today it's part of Swansea) would have seen any Jewish presence in 1749, let
alone any families settling in the area.

Bear in mind that in rural/farming areas, much of the population would have
been unable to read. But if they were literate, the Bible would have been
their only literature (probably in Welsh) and they would likely have
obtained surnames and given names >from this book. So a biblical name does
not necessarily indicate a Jewish background.

Robert W Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@...
(ex-Merthyr Tydfil)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom RE: jcr-uk digest: August 22, 2005 - SWANSEA #unitedkingdom

Hazel Dakers
 

Robert and the list

Sorry for the belated reply. I knew at the back of my mind I had checked out
Swansea for the possibility of some of my early family coming >from there
and have now found a note in my files:

The Jews of South Wales:historical studies. Cardiff: University of Wales
Press 1993. Ursula Henriques is the editor and wrote a number of the
chapters.

The first known settled community (as opposed to visiting pedlars and a
few individual residents) was in the third quarter of the eighteenth
century in Swansea - then a flourishing seaport.

There were quite a few pawnborkers there, one of whom was Greenbone Jacobs
of Swansea who was accused in the 1868 Midsummer Quarter Sessions of
receiving stolen rope p.81). He was born in 1796 and Michael Jacobs (late
C19th was probably descended >from him).

Swansea was an older Jewish community than that of Cardiff. According to a
reference (NH Saunders Swansea Hebrew Congregation 1830-1980, Centenary
pamphlet 1980, 209 - apparently not in British Library collection) the
lease of the first Swansea congregation dates back to 1768.

I then followed up and arranged for some research to be undertaken for me by
the local archives http://www.swansea.gov.uk/westglamorganarchives/ who were
very helpful.

Regards
Hazel Dakers, London UK

Researching: NORDEN (London & South Africa); HEIMANN (Luegde, Germany and
South Africa); GOLD (Zgierz and Lodz, Poland), BIRNBAUM (Zgierz and Lodz,
Poland)
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: ABRAHAMs in Wales
From: "robert fraser" <robertandginafraser@...>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2005 09:15:34 +0800
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi guys -

I seems unlikely to me that a rural area such as Llangyfelach (although
today it's part of Swansea) would have seen any Jewish presence in 1749, let
alone any families settling in the area.

Bear in mind that in rural/farming areas, much of the population would have
been unable to read. But if they were literate, the Bible would have been
their only literature (probably in Welsh) and they would likely have
obtained surnames and given names >from this book. So a biblical name does
not necessarily indicate a Jewish background.

Robert W Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@...
(ex-Merthyr Tydfil)