Date   

Re: Ancestry Promises Holocaust Records Will Be Free #announcements #holocaust

Paul Silverstone
 

The Arolsen records as found at the US Holocaust Museum contain some surprising information unrelated to Germany.  
I found passenger lists of Jews traveling from Shanghai to Israel after the war.

Paul Silverstone


Re: How to correct information in databases displayed on JewishGen #records #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

I first would like to thank Miriam Bulwar David-Hay for her detailed commentary 
on the problems relating to errata in databases.

I also want to use this opportunity to clarify the original subject line on this thread.  
There are some databases that can be searched via JewishGen that are made 
available by independent organizations among.  This includes, Jewish Records 
Indexing - Poland (JRI-Poland.org).

Therefore the original subject line on this thread might have been more accurately 
titled as it now appears above.  That is,  "How to correct information in databases 
displayed on JewishGen."

Miriam has shared some very important observations from her experience. That is: 

   "indexers are SUPPOSED to transcribe them exactly as they are written. 
    If there is an obvious error or discrepancy in a record" and that "many 
    indexers will add a note about it."

Over the years, JRI-Poland has discovered a multitude of errors/conflicts that can 
creep into records such as - but certainly not limited to:
 
1. Names data entered from index pages vary from the actual record. 
    These are corrected as JRI-Poland supplements the original index as part of 
    the Phase 3 initiative to fully extract vital records.  This article, in part, describes
    both the Phase 3 initiative and other aspects of JRI-Poland activity).  

2. Records (Akt numbers and associated names) missing from index pages.  

3. Surnames spelled differently in some records and are not sound alike matches.
    Example:  FRYMAN and FRYDMAN.   This may be an error but in other cases,
    an indication that a family used both names or simply the responsible registrar
    varied the name for unknown reasons. We do not change the name but we 
    make an appropriate notation in the record entry.

4. Typographical errors (Information incorrectly data entered by volunteers or
    professionals).

While making individual corrections to our online data currently requires removing
and replacing the entire file from our database, this will be changing under the 
Next Generation website and data management system. ("NextGen" was the
subject of the JRI-Poland presentation at the IAJGS International Conference on 
Jewish Genealogy held virtually earlier this month.) At that time, single corrections
will become possible. For details of NextGen, see JRI-poland.org/nextgeneration.pdf.   

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.   
Executive Director, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland, Inc.
 

8a. 
Re: How to correct information in Jewishgen Databases #records
From: Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
Date: Fri, 28 Aug 2020 09:42:37 EDT

As someone who has done indexing of Polish Jewish records for JRI-Poland, as well as translations of yizkor book entries for JewishGen, I’d like to clarify a few things here. There are really two places where errors can occur: either in the records themselves, or in the transcribing of records by an indexer.

With regard to the first category, the records are primary historical documents that say whatever they say, and indexers are SUPPOSED to transcribe them exactly as they are written. If there is an obvious error or discrepancy in a record — for example, one I have seen personally is in a World War II document where a person’s birth year was written as 1824 instead of 1924 — many indexers will add a note about it, but that is up to the individual indexer. It is not the job of JewishGen or of any indexer to fix the error or perceived error, and definitely not to embark on research to see if that record matches other information. I should also point out that most indexers are volunteers, and we put in a great deal of our own effort and time to index often hundreds or thousands of records in a set. Expecting volunteers not only to index records but also to fact-check the data they are indexing is neither realistic nor reasonable.
With regard to the second category, mistakes made in transcription by an indexer, yes, of course that happens. As I wrote above, indexers go through at hundreds or thousands of old records, which were written by myriad hands in old-fashioned and sometimes not-so-clear cursive script, and however conscientious and careful we may be, we can make errors. From personal experience I can say that in handwritten Polish documents, names like Chana, Chawa and Chaja, Moszka and Mordka, Icek and Josek, Srul and Szmul, and many others, can easily be confused for one another. One of my ancestral surnames is Kaluszyner; in Polish there is a stroke through the l, and I have sometimes seen this name indexed (wrongly) as “Katuszyner.” If someone does notice a mistake in transcription, I suppose they could write to JewishGen or JRI-Poland or whoever’s database it is, but I don’t know whether they have the ability, the staff or the resources to fix such errors. But really, does it matter so much? Thorough researchers will try to find all possible variations of the names of their ancestors, including unlikely ones, and will always aim to look at the original document and not just the index.

Finally, I’d just like to say that for me, and I’d imagine for many others, voluntary work is our way of giving back for all we have learned and gained from these websites over the years. In turn, the efforts of volunteers are what enable websites like JewishGen and JRI-Poland to offer the wonderful resources they offer. 
Wishing everyone all the best,
Miriam BULWAR DAVID-HAY,
Raanana, Israel. 


Re: I Want My Trees To Outlive Me #general

RichardWerbin
 

Rebba Solomon,
At this time, Ancestry.com does not require a subscription to have a family tree.
To access the tree, a person need to have a login. Their guest login option is free.

I set up a tree in this fashion for a friend who does not have any ancestry subscription.
She can login and edit the tree.

They also have good privacy settings. But, if you use those, people will need an explicit invitation from you to access the tree.
They do require a subscription for data search.

Richard Werbin


Re: I Want My Trees To Outlive Me #general

RichardWerbin
 

David Mason,
DVDs are not a long term option.
Today most laptops & desktops no longer include a DVD / CD reader. It is considered to be an obsolete options and is no longer supported.

Richard Werbin


Encyclopaedia Judaica - 1920 Berlin Version - Entry research #general

Yaron Wolfsthal
 

Dear Group,

The first edition of the Encyclopaedia Judaica was published in Berlin (late 1920, in German).

As a part of my family roots research, I'd appreciate help retrieving a particular entry in that edition.

If a subscriber of this mailing list happens to have this version of the Judaica, I'd appreciate a private response so I can specify my help request.
Thanks in advance - 

yaron.wolfsthal@...


Etymology of surname INGEROSE from Zhitomer #names

MarkWeinberg18@...
 

A relative from Zhitomer had the surname INGEROSE.  I have been trying to determine its etymology. 

It is not listed in Beider’s compendium “A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire”.  There is a listing for a similar sounding name INGEROV, where “Inger” means “young” and “ov” means “son of”. 

Another possibility is that it is a compound word made from “Inger” and “roze”, where “roze” means the rose flower.  Note that Beider concludes that the use of words like “roze” in Russian Empire names is not derived from a woman’s name.  I also could not find in Beider an example of “roze” being used as an ending in a compound word.

Can anyone shed light on this issue?

Thank you very much.

MarkWeinberg18@...> Wilmington DE


Re: Graves in Belz, Ukraine, Jewish cemetery? #rabbinic #ukraine #records

Janis and Joe Datz
 

My husband's grandparents lived in Kopaigorod (yet often some of their records indicate Beltz).  The family names are LEVOVICH and DATZ.  Many thanks.

Janis Datz


Re: Ancestry Promises Holocaust Records Will Be Free #announcements #holocaust

itencorinne@...
 

Hi

I often receive messages from people who found lists of the Arolsen Archives on ancestry and don't understand what this lists are.
Some people even don't realize that this lists come from the Arolsen Archives and they don't know what the Arolsen Archives are.
So I would recommend to search directly on the Database of the Arolsen Archives (mentioned above) rather than on ancestry.
Because there is for each collection a description which kind of document it is, when, where, by whom and for which purpose it was written.
I found out that the lists of South Germany, made by the Americans after the war, not only contain Jewish people and forced labourers,
who were persecuted before and during the war and after the war called Displaced Persons, but also other people from
foreign countries (with foreign nationality) who lived in South Germany during and after the war, but were not persecuted.
If you search the Database of the Arolsen Archives a window pops up which says, that all data is confident and for personal use only.
If something remains unclear there is the possibility to ask questions to the archivists of the Arolsen Archives. 

I found some evident information about Jewish and non-Jewish people related to my family on the Arolsen Archives. 
It actually helped me to find documents and information I didn't imagine that it could be held by the Arolsen Archives.

Regards
Corinne Iten


Re: Family Tree Recommendations #general

Sarah L Meyer
 

I like Legacy Family tree.  It is important to me to keep my tree on my computer.  The paid version ($35) offers cloud backup, it also has many more capabilities than the free version, but you can start with the free version and upgrade later without losing any data.  The family view screen, and colors are customizable.  
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Re: I Want My Trees To Outlive Me #general

Sarah L Meyer
 

I also want my trees to outlive me, both my Jewish one or ones and my husband's non-Jewish ones.  I am planning on at least one book for his tree and possibly one for mine.  I do however have my own website - and the wayback machine should archive it.   I do pay for hosting, but a google search will turn up free hosting.   My site uses TNG and that is a one time charge for the software that is installed on the server.  Another option is to do a free trial of Ancestry.com and upload your trees there.  They will not be changed.
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Part 2 of how I discovered the whereabouts of cousins thought to have perished in the Holocaust #holocaust

Michael Moritz
 

Last week, I shared how I was able to discover through genealogical research that two of my grandmother's first cousins who she believed died in the Holocaust actually survived and lived out their lives in Europe, unbeknownst to her. This week's installment describes how I discovered the experiences of these two brothers during the war, in France and England, and after the war, in those countries and in Prague, capping off a 6-country research endeavor to locate the whereabouts of these two brothers. Thank you for all of the great feedback and comments! https://moritzresearch.blogspot.com/2020/08/they-survived-war-but-how-part-2-of-how.html.

Best,
Michael Moritz (info@...)
New York


Re: Marienthal...what is it? #general

David Barrett
 

There is such  a place 30 km+  SW of Vienna, which was a focus of a social study in the early 1930s

David Barrett


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #ukraine #yizkorbooks

Bruce Drake
 

In early April, the prisoners of Buchenwald could hear the distant sound of artillery from General George Patton's advancing Third U.S. Army, At about 2 p.m. on April 11, American tanks appeared in the beech forest after which the camp had been named. There was gunfire. Most of Buchenwald’s 5,000 SS guards had already fled. By then, thousands of the prisoners had been forced to evacuate by the SS by foot and train to prevent their rescue. Patton was so disgusted by what he found that he ordered the mayor of Weimar to bring 1,000 citizens to Buchenwald to ensure that the German people would take responsibility for Nazi crimes, instead of dismissing them as propaganda.
“Remembrances of a Survivor,” from the Yizkor book of Belki, Ukraine recounts in first person the days leading up to the liberation, the flight of the Nazis, the reactions of American soldiers to what they saw when they entered the barracks, and how the inmates, spared from death, responded to their liberation: “They gathered to pray, to cry and to say Kaddish for their dear ones. In spite of all, they somehow found the strength to overcome their grief and anger, and rose above everything.”

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD


Kudos Re: Searching Hamburg lists for family groups #records

eej787@...
 

Kudos on your research.  I wish it is successful.

I wrote to Hamburg re: my father's departure in 1923 but I got an odd answer .

Where did you find the Hamburg lists - online?

Ed Just
eej787@...


Re: ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #poland #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

VM85114

In Rusian:

 

Замбров

#73

 

Состоялось в посаде Замбров, 15-го (27) июля 1894-го года, в 11 часов утра, явился лично еврей Арон Файбович Рожанович, сапожник, 32 лет, живущий в посаде Замбров в присутствии свидетелей Нахмана Граница, 32 лет и Гершка-Мотыль Бурштын, 36 лет, оба учителя жители посада Замбров и предявили нам младенца мужского пола, объявляя, что он родился в посаде Замбров 8-го (20-го) июля сего года в 6 часа вечера от законной жены Ени-Мириам, двух имен, урожденной Ябко, 29 лет.  Младенцу сему при обрезании дано имя Шимко-Файвель.  Акт сей составлен и присутствующим прочитан и подписан, кроме объявляющих себя безграмотными.

 

Подпись  Подпись

Чиновник гражданского состояния   Подпись

 

Translate into English:

 

Zambrov

 

# 73

 

Held in Posad Zambrov, on July 15 (27), 1894, at 11 am, a Jew Aron Faibovich Rozhanovich, a shoemaker, 32 years old, who lives in Posad Zambrov in the presence of witnesses Nakhman Granits, 32 years old, and Gershka-Motyl appeared in person Burshtyn, 36 years old, both teachers are residents of the Zambrov Posad and presented us with a male baby, announcing that he was born in the Zambrov Posad on July 8 (20) of this year at 6 pm from the lawful wife of Yeni-Miriam, two names, nee Yabko, 29 years old. This child was given the name Shimko-Faivel during circumcision. This act was drawn up and those present read and signed, except for those who declare themselves illiterate.

 

Signature Signature

Civil Status Official Signature

Translated by Michael Ryabinky


Re: ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #poland #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

VM85113

In Russian:

 

Замбров

#106

 

Состоялось в посаде Замбров, 9-го (21) декабря 1894-го года, в 11 часов утра, явился лично еврей Арон Файбович Рожанович, сапожник, 32 лет, живущий в посаде Замбров в присутствии свидетелей Нахмана Граница, 32 лет и Гершка-Мотыль Бурштын, 36 лет, оба учителя жители посада Замбров и предявили нам младенца мужского пола, объявляя, что он родился в посаде Замбров 2-го (14-го) декабря сего года в 2 часа дня от законной жены Ени-Мириам, двух имен, урожденной Ябко, 28 лет.  Младенцу сему при обрезании дано имя Маркель-Лейба.  Акт сей составлен и присутствующим прочитан и подписан, кроме объявляющих себя безграмотными.

 

Подпись  Подпись

Чиновник гражданского состояния   Подпись

 

Translate into English:

 

Zambrov

 

# 106

 

Held in posad Zambrov, on December 9 (21), 1894, at 11 o'clock in the morning, a Jew Aron Faibovich Rozhanovich, a shoemaker, 32 years old, who lives in posad Zambrov in the presence of witnesses Nachman Granits, 32 years old, and Gershka-Motyl Burshtyn, 36 years old, both teachers are residents of the Zambrov Posad and presented us with a male baby, announcing that he was born in the Zambrov Posad on December 2 (14) of this year at 2 pm from the lawful wife of Yeni-Miriam, two names, nee Yabko, 28 years old. This child was given the name Markel-Leiba during circumcision. This act was drawn up and those present read and signed, except for those who declare themselves illiterate.

 

Signature Signature

 

Civil Status Official Signature

 

Lust name of Yeni-Miriam is Yabko.  On my first translation it was Yabno.  It is much clear writing on the  VM85113

Translated by Michael Ryabinky


Re: ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #poland #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

VM 85112

In Russian:

 

Замбров

#30

 

Состоялось в посаде Замбров, 27 мая (8 июня) 1887-го года.  Явился еврей Арон Файбович Рожанович, сапожник, 25 лет в присутствии свидетелей Израиля Цибельмана, 49 лет и Боруха Соляржа, 36 лет, оба жители посада Замбров и предявили нам младенца мужского пола, объявляя, что он родился в посаде Замбров 20-го мая (1 июня) сего года в 6 часов вечера от законной жены Ени-Мириам, двух имен, урожденной Ябно, 22 года.  Младенцу сему при обрезании дано имя Хаим-Вольф.  Акт сей окончен и подписан, кроме объявляющих себя безграмотными.

 

Подпись  Подпись

Чиновник гражданского состояния   Подпись

 

Translate into English:

 

Zambrov

#thirty

 

Held in Posad Zambrov, May 27 (June 8) 1887. A Jew Aron Faibovich Rozhanovich, a shoemaker, 25 years old, appeared in the presence of witnesses Israel Tsibelman, 49 years old and Borukh Solyarzh, 36 years old, both residents of the Zambrov posad and presented us with a male baby, announcing that he was born in Zambrov posad on May 20 (1 June) this year at 6 pm from the legal wife of Yeni-Miriam, two names, nee Yabno, 22 years old. When circumcised, this child was given the name Chaim-Wolf. This act is completed and signed, except for those who declare themselves illiterate.

 

Signature Signature

 

Civil Status Official Signature

Translated by Michael Ryabinky


Re: Obituaries in Paris newspapers #france

David Choukroun
 

Dear Boris, 

in addition, please find more details 



--
Regards,
David

david.choukroun@...
FRANCE

CHOUKROUN ATTALI ATLANI


Re: How to correct information in Jewishgen Databases #records

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

As someone who has done indexing of Polish Jewish records for JRI-Poland, as well as translations of yizkor book entries for JewishGen, I’d like to clarify a few things here. There are really two places where errors can occur: either in the records themselves, or in the transcribing of records by an indexer.

With regard to the first category, the records are primary historical documents that say whatever they say, and indexers are SUPPOSED to transcribe them exactly as they are written. If there is an obvious error or discrepancy in a record — for example, one I have seen personally is in a World War II document where a person’s birth year was written as 1824 instead of 1924 — many indexers will add a note about it, but that is up to the individual indexer. It is not the job of JewishGen or of any indexer to fix the error or perceived error, and definitely not to embark on research to see if that record matches other information. I should also point out that most indexers are volunteers, and we put in a great deal of our own effort and time to index often hundreds or thousands of records in a set. Expecting volunteers not only to index records but also to fact-check the data they are indexing is neither realistic nor reasonable.

With regard to the second category, mistakes made in transcription by an indexer, yes, of course that happens. As I wrote above, indexers go through at hundreds or thousands of old records, which were written by myriad hands in old-fashioned and sometimes not-so-clear cursive script, and however conscientious and careful we may be, we can make errors. From personal experience I can say that in handwritten Polish documents, names like Chana, Chawa and Chaja, Moszka and Mordka, Icek and Josek, Srul and Szmul, and many others, can easily be confused for one another. One of my ancestral surnames is Kaluszyner; in Polish there is a stroke through the l, and I have sometimes seen this name indexed (wrongly) as “Katuszyner.” If someone does notice a mistake in transcription, I suppose they could write to JewishGen or JRI-Poland or whoever’s database it is, but I don’t know whether they have the ability, the staff or the resources to fix such errors. But really, does it matter so much? Thorough researchers will try to find all possible variations of the names of their ancestors, including unlikely ones, and will always aim to look at the original document and not just the index.

Finally, I’d just like to say that for me, and I’d imagine for many others, voluntary work is our way of giving back for all we have learned and gained from these websites over the years. In turn, the efforts of volunteers are what enable websites like JewishGen and JRI-Poland to offer the wonderful resources they offer. 

Wishing everyone all the best,
Miriam BULWAR DAVID-HAY,
Raanana, Israel. 


Re: Derechin birth/marriage/death records #belarus

brotker@...
 

Hi Mary Ann , I also have family from Derechin and would love to find the revision lists that you mentioned. Please confirm where I can find them. Thankfully yours,

Bobby Rotker
Searching foe:
ZEITLIN, TSEITLIN from Derechin and Slonim
ROTKER, ROTKIER, RUDKIER from Warsaw
KERSZENBAUM, KIRSZENBAUM, KIRSCH from Ciechanow
LEVIN, LEWIN from Brest
FELDMAN from Brest
SAPERSZTEJN, SAPERSTEIN, SAPPERSTEIN from Ciechanow