Date   

USCIS Index Search #records

Carl Kaplan
 

I put in a USCIS index search before the fees go up. It is for my great-grandfather, who was born in Galicia. The choices for country include Austria and Austria-Hungary. However, you can only click on one, so I chose Austria-Hungary. Since he put down Austria on the census, like most Jews from Galicia did, should I be concerned they will not find any records for him? Do I need to put in another request for him with a country choice of Austria. I emailed them, but never heard back. Thanks in advance.
--
Carl Kaplan

KAPLAN Minsk, Belarus
EDELSON, EDINBURG Kovno, Lithuania
HOFFERT, BIENSTOCK< BIENENSTOCK Kolbuszowa, Galicia
STEINBERG, KLINGER, WEISSBERG, APPELBERG Bukaczowce, Galicia


ViewMate Translation request - Polish #translation #records #poland

fdbaran@...
 

I've posted two vital records in Polish. I would appreciate a translation.
They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=77974
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=77987

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much!

Flavio Baran
Brasília, Brazil


Re: Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

Dick Plotz <Dick@...>
 

Not all spelling differences are really "misspellings". Sometimes they
are; Robert Hanna's "Fellie" for Tillie is probably an erroneous
transcription. But in many if not most cases the explanation is
different.

For one thing, if a name was originally rendered in Yiddish or
Russian, using the Hebrew or Cyrillic alphabet, there is no
universally recognized transliteration system even now, and 100-150
years ago there was no system at all. Names were transliterated
however the person doing the transliteration heard them and chose to
try to spell them. And the next person would do it differently.

For another, the very notion that a surname even *had* a "correct"
spelling was foreign to all but the upper classes until very recently.
It started to happen in some European cities in the late 19th century,
but in the USA well into the 20th century the spelling of names,
especially surnames, was highly variable. My most extensive experience
with original records is with German records from the Rheinland before
1875. I have seen records from the 1860s in which the same person's
name was spelled three different ways in the same record, and this was
not rare.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA
dick@...

On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 9:58 AM Kathrynbkj via groups.jewishgen.org
<Kathrynbkj=aol.com@...> wrote:

Use wildcard symbols (typically asterisks) in your searches. My grandfather’s surname, Sader, was misspelled in every census! I then tried S*d*r and other combinations. You may get a lot of erroneous results, but you should also capture the right ones. - Kathryn Kanarek James, Annandale, VA


Identifying where an ancestor is from #russia #ukraine #romania

mattianlevine@...
 

Hello all! I have been going over documents of an ancestor of mine and he has listed his foreign residence as many different places. They are as follows: Padol-Russia, Podol-Russia, Russia, Romania, and finally Mesbesh-Soviet Union. The best I can come up with is Medzhybizh, which was in governorate of Podolia in Russia at the time. However, reading Romania on one census confused me, unless he was confused at the time when he filled it out. Thank you all!

-Matthew Levine
 
 


Re: Records for the town of Horochov, Volynia Gubernia #poland #ukraine

synhe@...
 

Hello Igor,
Thank you for your replay.
My family lived in Horochov but I do not know since when. I know that my grandmother was born in 1912 and so does, all her siblings were born there too. I assume the parents are about 20 years old when she was born (as the custom was to marry around 18-20) which places their dob at about 1890 or so.
 
Her father Levy Gojer had 2 brothers that I do know of their DOB, Abraham Goyer was born on July 15, 1878, and Ichiel Goyer was born on Apr 2, 1875. I don't have any other "hard" dates that I can refer to.
 
For this reason I mentioned that I am looking for any records (BMD) form 1825 and on for the Goyer family. Whoever left in Horocov in 1942, were marched into a nearby forest and were murdered there, so there would not be any death records for my grandmother siblings and parents but maybe for the grandparents if they died before WWII.
 
Thank you for any suggestions.
 
--
Yonat Klein
Syracuse NY


ViewMate translation request - Russian #translation

Maxwald
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM86610

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

This is the birth record of my late Auntie Matla Lewartowski.

 

I would like all the known details, as I have a conflict with the dates of birth.

Thank you very much.

Max Wald
Melbourne
Australia


Re: Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

sharon yampell
 

It is quite interesting that this topic came up just as I was sharing with a distant cousin what I thought was her downfall when trying o find family members…

 

She is always getting stuck on how the last name looks, rather than how it may sound… For example, we have family members with the last name of TUroff,,,,she would get caught up on only thinking of Turoff and possibly Turofsky…instead of thinking with a thick accent, the last name could also have been Turovsky with a V…Michele is correct, it is not always a misspelled last name but an alternative spelling…also be on the look out for permutations…I have one last name on my tree with at least a dozen or more permuations…

 

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, NJ

GenealogicalGenie@...

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Michele Lock
Sent: Monday, September 28, 2020 4:37 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

 

By misspelled family names, I assume you mean misspelled surnames. 
Myself, I've stopped thinking of them as misspelled, and instead as alternative spellings of the same or similar name. My own simple one-syllable surname, I have found in various US, German, and Lithuanian records as Lak, Lack, Lok, Lakas, Liak, Lyak, Locke, and Lock, all based on the Yiddish surname 'Lamed-Alelph-Koph' (from grandfather's US tombstone). I do consider a misspelling to be when a US census record has the surname as 'Lech', though perhaps the census taker mis-heard it. 
Looking for ship passenger lists was the most challenging, until I realized that a clerk in a shipping company in Hamburg or Bremen would write down the name with German spelling, which would be Lak or Lack. I searched for both these spellings then, and also tried my luck with Lok. Was a lot more fruitful. 
Using the SteveMorse.org option of 'Starts with' was also helpful, for both first names and surnames, along with the approximate birthyear (+/- 5 years minimum) and year of arrival (+/- 3 years minimum). I have had more luck doing broad searches rather than focused ones, especially with immigrants mis-remembering their year of arrival, and having only the broadest idea of what year they were born.

Michelle Lock

 


ViewMate translation request - Russian #translation

Maxwald
 


I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM86609

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

This is the Birth record of my late uncle Boruch Lewartowski.

 

I would like to have a extract of all the know details, as I have conflict with the dates

Thank you very much.

Max Wald
Melbourne 
Australia

 


Translation from "Russian? " to English #translation

Debby Myers
 

Could someone please translate this -was at back of photo of Rachiel Gurwitch to her brother Joseph. Joseph was last in Paris and then "disappeared". We think he joined the French Foreign Legion. I have tried to find him in their records but have not found anything -maybe not looking in the right place. 
Thanks for any help itr.
Debby Myers


Re: Bukofzer / Oppenheimer in France FRENCH records #france

David Choukroun
 

Hello David

In these archives, the files are most often linked to the surveillance carried out by the French police. 

Thus, you can find "confidential" reports about political activities, about meetings of various and varied associations, but also on regular subjects (debt, fights, accidents etc ...).
There are also documents on the property of people who passed through Drancy. 

Often very interesting, because the services of the Prefects and the French Police made full and detailed descriptions of the lives of people "under surveillance".

One also finds there searches in the "Sommiers" i.e. in the criminal records of the French Police.

-- 
Regards,
David CHOUKROUN

david.choukroun@...
FRANCE

CHOUKROUN ATTALI ATLANI


Re: Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

Michele Lock
 

By misspelled family names, I assume you mean misspelled surnames. 
Myself, I've stopped thinking of them as misspelled, and instead as alternative spellings of the same or similar name. My own simple one-syllable surname, I have found in various US, German, and Lithuanian records as Lak, Lack, Lok, Lakas, Liak, Lyak, Locke, and Lock, all based on the Yiddish surname 'Lamed-Alelph-Koph' (from grandfather's US tombstone). I do consider a misspelling to be when a US census record has the surname as 'Lech', though perhaps the census taker mis-heard it. 
Looking for ship passenger lists was the most challenging, until I realized that a clerk in a shipping company in Hamburg or Bremen would write down the name with German spelling, which would be Lak or Lack. I searched for both these spellings then, and also tried my luck with Lok. Was a lot more fruitful. 
Using the SteveMorse.org option of 'Starts with' was also helpful, for both first names and surnames, along with the approximate birthyear (+/- 5 years minimum) and year of arrival (+/- 3 years minimum). I have had more luck doing broad searches rather than focused ones, especially with immigrants mis-remembering their year of arrival, and having only the broadest idea of what year they were born.

Michelle Lock


Re: issues of DNA privacy #dna

Mashiach L. Bjorklund
 

Judy,
To be honest, there is no guarantee of absolute privacy with a DNA test. All you can do is add levels of anonymity to your test results. Examples: Do not use an identifiable name. Do not attach your DNA results to a tree. Do not make your ethnicity results publicly available. Beyond those simple actions there is not much you can do.

If someone shows up as a DNA relative to me, even with all the above in place, there are enough of my relatives who have taken tests for me use the "genetic distances" of the unknown person to them and me, to allow me to calculate with relative accuracy who they are.

In fact, recently second cousin took a test. They pretty much had done all of the above. Within an hour I was looking at their Facebook profile and pictures of their family. Coincidentally, their Facebook page had a post where they said they had just taken an ancestry DNA test and they posted their ethnicity results.

Probably the best approach is to share with the individual you want to take the test what you have done and discovered already through your test. Perhaps you can convince them to take a leap of faith and try to discover more about your shared family history.

Mash Bjorklund
Clearwater, FL


Yiddish surnames related to 'Morrison' #ukraine #names

Michele Lock
 

I have located the 1920 New York City marriage record for a great aunt who was born in Ukraine (in or near Odessa), in about 1900. In the record she lists her mother's maiden name as 'Morrison', which I am certain is the Americanized form of the original Yiddish surname. My question is - what might the original name have been? I know that here in the US, 'Morris' was often chosen for a man whose Hebrew/Yiddish name was Moshe/Mausha/Movsha, so I am thinking the surname may have been a variant of 'son of Moshe', such as Moskowitz, Moiseev, and so on. What other options might there be for 'Morrison'?

Michele Lock
Alexandria, VA

searching for:
Lak/Lack/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziaia, Lithuania
Leybman/Leapman/Lipman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Kalmonowitz in Minsk Gubernia, Belarus
Olitsky in Alytus/Suwalki/Lithuania-Poland
Gutman in Czestokowa, Poland
Kagan/Kogan in Odessa, Ukraine


Re: How to find UKRAINE birth and marriage records #ukraine #records #russia

Gary Pokrassa
 

Alan - there are index files available on Alex K wikis for Odessa but only from 1903-1919.....I don't see anything else on his site...the JG database does have the 1895 revision list online again not the period you need

sorry I cant find anything more on point for you
Gary Pokrassa
gpokrassa@...
Data Acquisition Director
Ukraine Research Division
JewishGen.org


Re: Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

Mashiach L. Bjorklund
 

Wildcard searching

It’s important to remember that names are often misspelled or mis-transcribed, so doing “fuzzy” searching on names can often help you find a good match, even though the name may look wrong. In the name and keyword fields, you can do extremely fuzzy searches by using wildcards. Wildcards are special symbols (the asterisk "*" and the question mark "?") that are used in searching to represent some number of unknown letters in a word. Wildcards can be effective search tools if you are searching for words or names with alternate spellings:

An asterisk "*" represents zero or more characters (e.g., a search for "john*" might return "john, johnson, johnsen, johnathon, johns", etc.).

  • Any use of the asterisk requires at least two non-wildcard characters (you cannot search for "S*", but could use "Sm*").
  • A single character is represented by question mark "?" (e.g., "Sm?th" equals both "Smith" and Smyth").

I clipped that from Ancestry.com. It's a good description of how to use wild card searching.

It also helps to understand soundex and how the database you are using applies it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soundex

If you have an Ancestry.com account try this link: https://support.ancestry.com/s/article/Searching-with-Soundex

Mash Bjorklund
Clearwater, FL


Re: Goldkranc in Brzeziny #poland #records

Sherri Bobish
 


Relly,

Other options for finding names of parents of the original immigrants:

Circa 1910 passenger manifests for the U.S. listed not only the person the immigrant was bound for, but also closest relative left behind.  In both cases the person listed may be a parent.

Various U.S. vital records for the original immigrants may list parents names.

Original Social Security Applications (SS5) listed parents names.  Ancestry has a database of transcriptions of some of these.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Yiddush to English from Holocaust Survivors #yiddish #galicia #holocaust #photographs

Sherri Bobish
 


Deborah,

Do you mean Tarnobrzeg?
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-532659

There are records for Tarnobrzeg at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Poland/

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: My family MANN/LICHTENSTEIN from Perleberg #names #germany

Sherri Bobish
 


Katja,

Try:  https://www.familysearch.org/search/
They seem to have some records from Perleberg.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

Sherri Bobish
 


Nancy,

Many databases allow a soundex (sounds like) search on surnames, some allow a soundex search on first names as well,

If the surname was totally mangled (either in the original document or the index) a search by first name with many parameters included can work in some instances, like FamilySearch or Ancestry. Of course, that assumes that the first name wasn't mangled as well.

For example, search first name only, and include range of possible birth year, country of birth, or state of birth, and also residence (state, if U.S.) at the time frame you are searching.  In FamilySearch & Ancestry you can put in first names (without surname) of husband / wife / children.

Check out Steve Morse's website for portals to many databases:  https://stevemorse.org/

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Translation from Russian needed #translation

David Mason
 

These are references to articles/books about Babi Yar:

 

"Memory of Babi Yar.  Book of Martyrs"  / Author V. A. Zgursky.  Kiev: newspaper "Moment of silence" and "Young Guards" 1991, page 862.

Articles about Valentin Arsentievich Zgursky (2/9/1927 - 10/24/2014), Mayor of Kiev 1979-1990

https://www.nytimes.com/1989/03/28/world/soviet-voters-deal-humiliating-blow-to-party-officials.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valentyn_Zghursky

Longer article in Russian:

https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%97%D0%B3%D1%83%D1%80%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B9,_%D0%92%D0%B0%D0%BB%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%82%D0%B8%D0%BD_%D0%90%D1%80%D1%81%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%82%D1%8C%D0%B5%D0%B2%D0%B8%D1%87

 

"Babi Yar: Book of Memories"/Author I. M. Levitas 2005, page 250.

Levitas, Ilya Mikhailovich 12/11/1931 (Tashkent) - 8/3/2014 (Kiev).  Historian, journalist, teacher.  Author of works on Jewish history in Ukraine, especially WWII.    More than 220 publications.

Quote: "The main thing was victory.  We have to live tragically all our lives.  We Jews are heroic people.  We fought together with everyone and not apart."

http://www.jewukr.org/biograf/levitas_e.html

http://babynyar.gov.ua/en/memory-imlevitas

https://babynyar.org/en/news/1727

 

-David Mason, Culver City, California.

 

 

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