Date   

Szczerzec #galicia

Eli Brauner
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

<<There were two towns, both within the Lwow Province, known by name
Szczerzec. The less known Szczerzec has retained its original name which
has been transliterated by USBGN system as Shcherets, Ukraine at 5007
2334, near modern Polish border. Town was also known as Szczerzec ad
(near) Nemirow in Rawa Ruska district.>>

I have learned that there are 4 villages with the name Szczerzec in Galicia:

1. village between Rohatyn and Podkamien/Strzeliska Nowe, on the
important road to Lwow
2. village near Sieniawa/Jaroslaw
3. hamlet at village Graboszczyce near Wadowice
4. hamlet at the village of Uscieszko near Zaleszczyki

Where to look for my Schrenzel ancestors? In all of them!

Eli Brauner


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Szczerzec #galicia

Eli Brauner
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

<<There were two towns, both within the Lwow Province, known by name
Szczerzec. The less known Szczerzec has retained its original name which
has been transliterated by USBGN system as Shcherets, Ukraine at 5007
2334, near modern Polish border. Town was also known as Szczerzec ad
(near) Nemirow in Rawa Ruska district.>>

I have learned that there are 4 villages with the name Szczerzec in Galicia:

1. village between Rohatyn and Podkamien/Strzeliska Nowe, on the
important road to Lwow
2. village near Sieniawa/Jaroslaw
3. hamlet at village Graboszczyce near Wadowice
4. hamlet at the village of Uscieszko near Zaleszczyki

Where to look for my Schrenzel ancestors? In all of them!

Eli Brauner


Query re: bride price or dower in 1800's marriage records #ukraine

Fern Blood <feblood@...>
 

In 1851 marriage records >from Pyatigory (a shtetl south of Kiev) grooms
commit to provide the bride silver in the amount of 24 to 48 rubles. Is
anyone familiar with this practice, as different >from the bride's parents
providing money or goods to the groom or his family?

Thank you,
Fern Greenberg Blood
Waterbury, VT

GREENBERG, GRIBELYUK, SHPINDELYUK, POSTILNICK in Pyatigory; ROSETSKY in
Zhashkov, GRIBELYUK in Zhivotov


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Query re: bride price or dower in 1800's marriage records #ukraine

Fern Blood <feblood@...>
 

In 1851 marriage records >from Pyatigory (a shtetl south of Kiev) grooms
commit to provide the bride silver in the amount of 24 to 48 rubles. Is
anyone familiar with this practice, as different >from the bride's parents
providing money or goods to the groom or his family?

Thank you,
Fern Greenberg Blood
Waterbury, VT

GREENBERG, GRIBELYUK, SHPINDELYUK, POSTILNICK in Pyatigory; ROSETSKY in
Zhashkov, GRIBELYUK in Zhivotov


TEUTSCH from Mussbach and Venningen / Gerson Aschkenasy SITE CITE #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

Albert Teutsch: Geschichte der Juden der Gemeinde Venningen: Familie
Teutsch von 1590-1936. Karlsruhe 1936

gives a genealogy of the TEUTSCH family >from Mussbach and Venningen.

The pedigree sheets of this book are online at:
https://archive.org/details/lbi_reel2_test

According to this book, the Teutsch family are descendants of "Gerson
Aschkenasy", born in Debrzyn in 1590, died in Nikolsburg / Mikoluv in
1660. According to a Geni.com genealogy, he was rabbi in Nikolsburg.

Does anyone know whether this book and the genealogy are reliable?

I ask because:

a) I cannot find any other source mentioning this Gerson Aschkenasy
1590-1660. He is different >from the famous Gershon Ashkenazi, died in
Metz 1693.
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/1966-ashkenazi-gershon

b) Jütle Jakob, wife of Avrohom bar Gershon, is said to be born in 1633.
Her son Izchak bar Avrohom, in 1680. To give birth at the age of 47
seems exceptionel. Reliable? Any comments are really appreciated.

Regards, Tobias Kemper, Germany, kemper@lenz-kemper.de


German SIG #Germany TEUTSCH from Mussbach and Venningen / Gerson Aschkenasy SITE CITE #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

Albert Teutsch: Geschichte der Juden der Gemeinde Venningen: Familie
Teutsch von 1590-1936. Karlsruhe 1936

gives a genealogy of the TEUTSCH family >from Mussbach and Venningen.

The pedigree sheets of this book are online at:
https://archive.org/details/lbi_reel2_test

According to this book, the Teutsch family are descendants of "Gerson
Aschkenasy", born in Debrzyn in 1590, died in Nikolsburg / Mikoluv in
1660. According to a Geni.com genealogy, he was rabbi in Nikolsburg.

Does anyone know whether this book and the genealogy are reliable?

I ask because:

a) I cannot find any other source mentioning this Gerson Aschkenasy
1590-1660. He is different >from the famous Gershon Ashkenazi, died in
Metz 1693.
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/1966-ashkenazi-gershon

b) Jütle Jakob, wife of Avrohom bar Gershon, is said to be born in 1633.
Her son Izchak bar Avrohom, in 1680. To give birth at the age of 47
seems exceptionel. Reliable? Any comments are really appreciated.

Regards, Tobias Kemper, Germany, kemper@lenz-kemper.de


NEUBERGER and BUERGER from Gaugrehweiler #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

Michael NEUBERGER, merchand in Gaugrehweiler, born before 1800, still
alive in 1849, married to Karolina BUERGER, alive in 1849,
daughter: Johannetta, born in Gaugrehweiler on 14.08.1818.

Thank you in advance, kind regards,

Tobias A. Kemper, Germany, kemper@lenz-kemper.de


Seeking on WALTER family #germany

Daniel Schwab <schwab.daniel@...>
 

Hi,

I am looking for friends and relatives who are alive of the following
people mostly >from the Frankfurt area:

August WALTER (corresponded late 40's early 50's) Koln =E2=80=93 Bruck
Am Klausenberg 61

Hope to hear >from you soon. Best regards, Daniel Schwab


German SIG #Germany NEUBERGER and BUERGER from Gaugrehweiler #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

Michael NEUBERGER, merchand in Gaugrehweiler, born before 1800, still
alive in 1849, married to Karolina BUERGER, alive in 1849,
daughter: Johannetta, born in Gaugrehweiler on 14.08.1818.

Thank you in advance, kind regards,

Tobias A. Kemper, Germany, kemper@lenz-kemper.de


German SIG #Germany Seeking on WALTER family #germany

Daniel Schwab <schwab.daniel@...>
 

Hi,

I am looking for friends and relatives who are alive of the following
people mostly >from the Frankfurt area:

August WALTER (corresponded late 40's early 50's) Koln =E2=80=93 Bruck
Am Klausenberg 61

Hope to hear >from you soon. Best regards, Daniel Schwab


name adoption lists, Pfalz? #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

have the name adoption lists of the Pfalz area (1808) been published?
I'm especially interested in Herschberg, Venningen, Altenbamberg, Bad
Muenster am Stein, Biedesheim, Gaugrehweiler.

Thank you for any ideas. Regards

Tobias A. Kemper, Germany, kemper@lenz-kemper.de


Oakland, Monday, October 10, 2016: San Francisco's Own Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico #general

janicemsj@...
 

San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society

San Francisco's Own Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico

Monday October 10, 2016
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Congregation Beth Am
26790 Arastradero Road Room 5/6
Los Altos Hills, California

A Jewish businessman originally >from England and South Africa, Joshua Abraham
Norton arrived in San Francisco in 1849 with $40,000, which after some shrewd
investing increased to $250,000 (about $3 million today). After losing his
fortune to a bad rice investment, Norton disappeared, returning to San
Francisco in 1859 and declaring himself Norton I, Emperor of the United States
and Protector of Mexico. In any other city he would have been dismissed as a
madman, but the people of San Francisco embraced his reign. Speaker Joseph
Amster will talk about Norton's life through bringing him to life via acting
out the part.

Meetings are free and everyone interested is welcome to attend. For
more information, visit our site at http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs/

Preeva Tramiel, Board Member
San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society


German SIG #Germany name adoption lists, Pfalz? #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Hello,

have the name adoption lists of the Pfalz area (1808) been published?
I'm especially interested in Herschberg, Venningen, Altenbamberg, Bad
Muenster am Stein, Biedesheim, Gaugrehweiler.

Thank you for any ideas. Regards

Tobias A. Kemper, Germany, kemper@lenz-kemper.de


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Oakland, Monday, October 10, 2016: San Francisco's Own Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico #general

janicemsj@...
 

San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society

San Francisco's Own Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico

Monday October 10, 2016
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Congregation Beth Am
26790 Arastradero Road Room 5/6
Los Altos Hills, California

A Jewish businessman originally >from England and South Africa, Joshua Abraham
Norton arrived in San Francisco in 1849 with $40,000, which after some shrewd
investing increased to $250,000 (about $3 million today). After losing his
fortune to a bad rice investment, Norton disappeared, returning to San
Francisco in 1859 and declaring himself Norton I, Emperor of the United States
and Protector of Mexico. In any other city he would have been dismissed as a
madman, but the people of San Francisco embraced his reign. Speaker Joseph
Amster will talk about Norton's life through bringing him to life via acting
out the part.

Meetings are free and everyone interested is welcome to attend. For
more information, visit our site at http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs/

Preeva Tramiel, Board Member
San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society


Issue 127 of Genealo-J has just been published #poland

Georges Graner
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 127, Fall 2016

Patrick BLOND describes the short and brilliant life of Mademoiselle
Rachel (1821-1858), a famous tragedian who can be considered as the
first star of the French stage. Rachel FELIX was born Elisa FELIX in
Mumpf (Switzerland). Her father, Jacob FELIX, was a poor peddler who
went >from places to places in Germany, Switzeland, and France so that
his eight children were born in eight different cities. When they were 6
or 7, Rachel and her older sister were sent in the streets to sing and
beg. At the age of 17, she made her stage debut at the Comedie Francaise
and was soon the queen of the Parisian society. She toured all over
Europe, including Russia, and finally the United States in 1855. She
died in 1858 >from tuberculosis. Her lovers were numerous including the
later Emperor Napoleon III. Patrick BLOND also details the theatrical
careers of her siblings and the fate of her children.

In the preceding issue of our Journal, Martine BERTHELOT PUIG-MORENO
dealt with the 251 Jews >from Spain converted to Catholicism in the
diocese of Barcelona between 1847 and 1947 but mainly around 1940. In
the second part of this paper, we find in a synoptic form the names of
these people. The chart also shows the date of their baptism, the date
and place of birth of each person and when data are available the names
of the parents and paternal and maternal grandparents, together with the
cities or countries where they were born.

Claude STUDIEVIC publishes a paper titled Traces and memories of
Polish STUDNIEWICZ, LINDNER, SZTATMAN, WEINSZTEJN families.. This work
is part of a research in the history and chronicle of a family
emigration >from Poland to France, Belgium and England >from 1913-14 to
1933. The present means of communication, the progressive scanning of
data and their relatively easy access, and the support found within the
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, have helped to fill some of the gaps and
identify ancestors since the 18th century. The extermination of the
members of the family remained in Poland was total while those who were
in Western Europe escaped the disaster with two exceptions. This paper
is dedicated to them.

During World War I, the Ottoman Empire was allied to the German and
Austrian empires. Therefore all subjects of the Ottoman Empire living in
France were strictly controlled and needed official permissions to move
in the country. A team of eight members of our society has been given
the task to analyze, scan and digitalize all the files of the French
diplomatic archives relative to these ottoman subjects. This mean 6,000
files, each for a family. Although Armenians, christian Greeks and other
nationalities are found in these files, 50 to 58% of the total are Jews
and our team focused on them. In many cases, the files allowed us to
build family trees. Our database contains 20,000 pictures of all the
documents. Michele FELDMAN, the author of this paper, details two
interesting families : that of Maurice Moise BERUHIEL, a wealthy
businessman born in Istanbul and that of Joseph SALTIEL, a poor man,
born in Salonique, who was in danger of being interned.


JRI Poland #Poland Issue 127 of Genealo-J has just been published #poland

Georges Graner
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 127, Fall 2016

Patrick BLOND describes the short and brilliant life of Mademoiselle
Rachel (1821-1858), a famous tragedian who can be considered as the
first star of the French stage. Rachel FELIX was born Elisa FELIX in
Mumpf (Switzerland). Her father, Jacob FELIX, was a poor peddler who
went >from places to places in Germany, Switzeland, and France so that
his eight children were born in eight different cities. When they were 6
or 7, Rachel and her older sister were sent in the streets to sing and
beg. At the age of 17, she made her stage debut at the Comedie Francaise
and was soon the queen of the Parisian society. She toured all over
Europe, including Russia, and finally the United States in 1855. She
died in 1858 >from tuberculosis. Her lovers were numerous including the
later Emperor Napoleon III. Patrick BLOND also details the theatrical
careers of her siblings and the fate of her children.

In the preceding issue of our Journal, Martine BERTHELOT PUIG-MORENO
dealt with the 251 Jews >from Spain converted to Catholicism in the
diocese of Barcelona between 1847 and 1947 but mainly around 1940. In
the second part of this paper, we find in a synoptic form the names of
these people. The chart also shows the date of their baptism, the date
and place of birth of each person and when data are available the names
of the parents and paternal and maternal grandparents, together with the
cities or countries where they were born.

Claude STUDIEVIC publishes a paper titled Traces and memories of
Polish STUDNIEWICZ, LINDNER, SZTATMAN, WEINSZTEJN families.. This work
is part of a research in the history and chronicle of a family
emigration >from Poland to France, Belgium and England >from 1913-14 to
1933. The present means of communication, the progressive scanning of
data and their relatively easy access, and the support found within the
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, have helped to fill some of the gaps and
identify ancestors since the 18th century. The extermination of the
members of the family remained in Poland was total while those who were
in Western Europe escaped the disaster with two exceptions. This paper
is dedicated to them.

During World War I, the Ottoman Empire was allied to the German and
Austrian empires. Therefore all subjects of the Ottoman Empire living in
France were strictly controlled and needed official permissions to move
in the country. A team of eight members of our society has been given
the task to analyze, scan and digitalize all the files of the French
diplomatic archives relative to these ottoman subjects. This mean 6,000
files, each for a family. Although Armenians, christian Greeks and other
nationalities are found in these files, 50 to 58% of the total are Jews
and our team focused on them. In many cases, the files allowed us to
build family trees. Our database contains 20,000 pictures of all the
documents. Michele FELDMAN, the author of this paper, details two
interesting families : that of Maurice Moise BERUHIEL, a wealthy
businessman born in Istanbul and that of Joseph SALTIEL, a poor man,
born in Salonique, who was in danger of being interned.


Danzig Database Update #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I am delighted to announce that the following datasets have been added
to the Danzig Database, which is included in searches of both
JewishGen's Germany and Poland Databases. For further details and
special search tips, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/germany/danzig.htm.

1) Danzig births 1905-1931, >from FHL microfilm 1184407/2.

2) Judenporzellan Purchased by Danzig Jews, thanks to the research of
Dr. Tobias Schenk. The Danzig records cover 1774-1786, pre-dating
surname adoption in the area, though about half of the people
mentioned might appear on the 1814 surname adoption list. For an
introduction by Dr. Schenk, see also
http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/judenporzellan.php.

3) Protected Jews >from Hoppenbruch, Stolzenberg, and Langfuhr, 1773,
database-friendly version of content >from our SIG website.

Thanks to Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias for assistance in putting
the data online.

If you are researching people >from Danzig, please help prioritize
ongoing and future transcription efforts by completing the short
survey at https://goo.gl/forms/HQddpV0Eklq53tNH2. Thank you.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


JRI Poland #Poland Danzig Database Update #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I am delighted to announce that the following datasets have been added
to the Danzig Database, which is included in searches of both
JewishGen's Germany and Poland Databases. For further details and
special search tips, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/germany/danzig.htm.

1) Danzig births 1905-1931, >from FHL microfilm 1184407/2.

2) Judenporzellan Purchased by Danzig Jews, thanks to the research of
Dr. Tobias Schenk. The Danzig records cover 1774-1786, pre-dating
surname adoption in the area, though about half of the people
mentioned might appear on the 1814 surname adoption list. For an
introduction by Dr. Schenk, see also
http://www.jewishgen.org/danzig/judenporzellan.php.

3) Protected Jews >from Hoppenbruch, Stolzenberg, and Langfuhr, 1773,
database-friendly version of content >from our SIG website.

Thanks to Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias for assistance in putting
the data online.

If you are researching people >from Danzig, please help prioritize
ongoing and future transcription efforts by completing the short
survey at https://goo.gl/forms/HQddpV0Eklq53tNH2. Thank you.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Przemysl secondary school records 1851-1939 #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Przemysl secondary school records for 1851-1939, for the gymnasium
named after Juliusz Slowacki, are now viewable online and include
genealogically useful information about students: birth date and
place, father's name and address. Many Jewish students are included
(religion is often stated). These handwritten records are not
indexed, but are very legible and are typically alphabetized per
school year or per class per year. They were digitized by the
Przemysl Branch of the Polish State Archives with support >from the
Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. Note that these school
records are different than the typewritten school reports that list
students but rarely include such details (some of those reports are
searchable at genealogyindexer.org).

To view the records, go to http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/skany/, then
change the top drop-down option, "Nr zespolu," to "387" and press the
"Szukaj" button at the bottom. You will see a table where each row
refers to a group of scans, usually covering a single school year. In
the first column on the left, "Sygnatura," is a link to the scans.
Clicking that link brings up a small image of the first scan with
links below it to jump to other scans. Clicking that small image will
enlarge it. When viewing an enlarged scan, you can press the right or
left arrow to move forward or backward one scan, and there is an icon
on the left of a downward arrow in a circle, which you can click to
download the scan to your computer.

I have no other information about this material and regret that I am
not able to provide individual assistance.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


JRI Poland #Poland Przemysl secondary school records 1851-1939 #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Przemysl secondary school records for 1851-1939, for the gymnasium
named after Juliusz Slowacki, are now viewable online and include
genealogically useful information about students: birth date and
place, father's name and address. Many Jewish students are included
(religion is often stated). These handwritten records are not
indexed, but are very legible and are typically alphabetized per
school year or per class per year. They were digitized by the
Przemysl Branch of the Polish State Archives with support >from the
Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. Note that these school
records are different than the typewritten school reports that list
students but rarely include such details (some of those reports are
searchable at genealogyindexer.org).

To view the records, go to http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/skany/, then
change the top drop-down option, "Nr zespolu," to "387" and press the
"Szukaj" button at the bottom. You will see a table where each row
refers to a group of scans, usually covering a single school year. In
the first column on the left, "Sygnatura," is a link to the scans.
Clicking that link brings up a small image of the first scan with
links below it to jump to other scans. Clicking that small image will
enlarge it. When viewing an enlarged scan, you can press the right or
left arrow to move forward or backward one scan, and there is an icon
on the left of a downward arrow in a circle, which you can click to
download the scan to your computer.

I have no other information about this material and regret that I am
not able to provide individual assistance.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.

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