Date   

Re: Looking for Herman/Hyman Wayler on ships manifest #general #lithuania

jbonline1111@...
 

Donna,

I would have suggested Steve Morse's pages.  Can you search Ancestry and Family Search with wildcards?  BTW, I think Mr. Morse has a link to report problems, so you may want to let him know about the problem you are experiencing. 
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: Slovakia civil registration records #records #slovakia

Vivian Kahn
 

Sally Bruckheimer's post is misleading. Hungary began civil registration  for all residents in October 1895. Prior to that time, Jewish and Christian births, deaths, and marriages were recorded by religious authorities and periodically collected by government officials. Religious records continued to be maintained separately.

Vivian Kahn
JewishGen Hungarian Research Director


Is there a repository of names of people who can assist with getting local records? #general #records

Rick Zeckel
 

From time to time I have seen requests here, on Facebook, and similar sites for recommendations related to a need to have a local source to locate records and/or do research. I have used some local sources (sometimes at a cost and sometimes not) but have always just stumbled across the people I've engaged for these purposes. Does anyone know of a centralized source for such information? 

Rick Zeckel
13919 Springmill Ponds Circle
Carmel, Indiana  46032
USA
Telephone: (317) 506-8937


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Adam Cherson
 

As a wise bird once said to me: never throw out the baby with the bathwater. Like with any other research tool, there is much bathwater in GENI, no doubt. There are also many well documented and sourced entries. If an entry does not possess sufficient indicia of reliability than I remain skeptical. As for the Mormon discussion, I have never experienced any interference in my own affairs by any Mormons or any other faith for that matter. The Mormon genealogical project (microfilming of records) has been instrumental to my research and I thank those responsible for this important work.

Adam Cherson


Translation Request - Polish #translation

Simon Zelman
 

Would someone be so kind as to translate this 1837 death record for my ancestor, Leib Bialobrodka? He was from Balbieriskis/Balwierzyszki (now in Lithuania) but apparently moved to Sniadowo, Poland sometime between when his wife died in 1832 and his death in 1837. I'd love to find out if there's any hint of why he moved in the death record (in addition to any other genealogical info). Thank you so much!

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=88076

Best,
Simon Zelman
San Francisco, CA


IGRA Free Webinar - “How Family Belongings, Objects and Ephemera Can Provide Insight into Our Families’ Lives” #events #announcements

Garri Regev
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) will be broadcasting a free webinar in English on Sunday, November 15th at 7 pm Israel Time, 12 pm (EST). The topic of the webinar is “How Family Belongings, Objects and Ephemera Can Provide Insight into Our Families’ Lives”  by Elena Biegel Bazes

Most researchers concentrate on records and documents when researching their families, but there are many clues to be found among family belongings and ephemera (items meant to last for a short time) that can enhance your research and provide insight into your family, such as the society in which they lived, their personalities, interests and much more. This presentation will discuss what belongings to look for to obtain clues and how this information can expand your research. Many examples of these items will be given during the presentation that could lead you to answer your questions and at the very least will enable you to assemble a bigger picture of your family members and their history.

Elena Bazes is IGRA secretary, newsletter editor and a member of the webinar committee. She has been doing genealogy research on her family since the early 1980’s. Elena lectured at the IAJGS conference in Orlando in 2017 and at meetings in Ra’anana on various genealogy topics. She is also a contributing editor to Avotaynu, the International Review of Jewish Genealogy. Elena is a retired college lecturer and lawyer.

Advanced registration is required:  You will receive confirmation of your registration with your personal Zoom link to enter the session. A reminder will be sent out closer to the date of the webinar.

To register:     https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwlf-CupjoiGdQ3IUhDcR4-tWpA9hcsIG9x

 

Garri Regev

IGRA President



Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Joyaa Antares
 

On Tue, Oct 27, 2020 at 09:12 AM, Max Heffler wrote:
Collaborative sites, like geni, provide the best possibility of progressive correctness for this record. When mistakes are found, they are corrected.

In writing the above, the poster misleads us by neglecting to mention the equal and opposite truth - that collaborative sites, like Geni, provide the best possibility of progressive incorrectness for this record.   Such an omission is disingenuous because we need to see both sides of the story.

There are different "schools" of thinking when it comes to how to do genealogical research.  For example, there is the school that uses open collaboration and - glaringly - mistakes are introduced and left in situ.  At other times, corrections are made and all benefit.
Other researchers belong to a school that uses tighter (or zero) systems of collaboration. This offers better control of the information but is still open to mistakes. 

Some researchers cite sources in a frankly scholarly manner, while others don't bother with citing sources and this makes information/misinformation more difficult to unravel.  Geni could insist that no data is allowed unless a source is cited.  I believe that this would improve the program enormously.  

Joyaa ANTARES

Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Dahn Cukier
 

Randy, I beg to deffer.

My sister (Z"L), put up a family tree on Geni. I attempted to
update her date-of-death and was unable until the
Genealogy conference in Jerusalem. There I was able update
her information and stop the hurtful birthday emails from being
delivered to us every year.

I also disagree that Geni has trusted information. If I had uploaded my
GED file 15 years ago, it would be wrong. I have continued
tracking at least  3rd cousins and their parents/grand-parents.
In 1901 2 people with the same name were born, one in Poland, one
in NJ. One mother was named the same as the eldest sister
of the other, who was old enough to be his mother. One is family,
the other is not.

I did once send a cousin a GED file, never again, it is out there with
no updates and mistakes of what there is. Now I send printouts with a
note that the information is not trustworthy and I should not be
listed as a source. When I get new information, I either
download/screenshot the source or enter in notes who supplied the
information, especially if a new born's information is supplied
by the parents.

Read carefully my signature, I one lived in an apartment with 4 addresses. One
from the PO on the building (7), one on city maps(1),
one on the cross street(32), the building touched that street,
and when I went to reserves, I was
with a person who moved in when the area was a construction zone and
he said the address is 167 of the only street in the area. I did not
move from the apartment for 16 years, but changed my address
constantly depending on who asked, city, PO or deliveries.

Dani


When you start to read readin,
how do you know the fellow that
wrote the readin,
wrote the readin right?

Festus Hagen
Long Branch Saloon
Dodge City, Kansas
(Gunsmoke)


On Wednesday, October 28, 2020, 9:38:03 PM GMT+2, E. Randol Schoenberg <randols@...> wrote:


I agree with Max.  Geni is by far the best tool we have for Jewish genealogy at the moment.  All of the best Jewish genealogists use it.  How do I know?  Because on Geni we can all see each other's work, correct mistakes and learn new information about resources in our areas of interest.  

Sadly, some people think genealogy is about hiding yourself and your family.  Nothing could be more wrong.  The more you share, the more you will learn.

As for Holocaust victims, we have on Geni various projects concerning the Holocaust, which are another great tool.  See the umbrella project at https://www.geni.com/projects/Holocaust-The-Final-Solution/10996

To learn more about why everyone should be using Geni for building their trees, please see my old blog at https://schoenblog.com/?p=712

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

David Lewin
 

Why are some people so concerned about the Mormon - now no longer
Church official practice - wish to baptize every one they can?
If I meet another human who has some peculiar belief and practice, I
know that this is his belief and practice and definitely not
mine. If he believes that he has baptized me, it is his belief,
not mine, I say let others believe what they wish. It is their
belief and their concern. Not mine!

We have so much to be grateful for to the Mormon people. We would
know next to nothing about - for example - East European Jewry. It
was the Mormons who spent their own time and money to record and make
available our heritage. Our leaders recorded the illustrious. The
Mormons recorded even the non-distinguished individuals

The Mormon Library - 4 buildings full of it !!! - is second to none
in records of our people. All they have is freely available and at
no financial charge to those who wish to avail themselves of it.

David Lewin
London


ViewMate translation request – Polish #translation

Kim Sheintal
 

Hi Everyone,   
 
I posted a three-page response from the State Archives in Mławas on ViewMate for which I need translation at the following:  
 
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.  
Thank you.
Kimberly Sheintal
Sarasota, Florida


Re: Looking for Herman/Hyman Wayler on ships manifest #general #lithuania

Susan&David
 

Good work Barbara!!
Using your findings I located him on the Ancestry's NY arrival as Metel Waler and on the detained aliens list as Motel Weiler.

David Rosen
Boston, MA



On 10/28/2020 4:11 PM, Barbara Zimmer wrote:

How about this man in 1901. 

 

 Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934

 
 
Name: Motel Weiler
Gender: männlich (Male)
Ethnicity/Nationality: Russland (Russian)
Marital status: ledig (Single)
Departure Age: 21
Birth Date: abt 1881
Residence Place: Wilkomir
Departure Date: 15 Jan 1902
Departure Place: Hamburg, Deutschland (Germany)
Arrival Place: New York
Occupation: Händler
Ship Name: Barcelona
 


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Stephen Katz
 

With all due respect to Mr. Schoenberg -- and great deal is due ... I think of him whenever I gaze upon Adele Block-Bauer, now at the Neue Gallerie in NY -- it's a pretty tall statement to say that "all the best Jewish genealogists" use geni. I wonder what criteria he uses to evaluate Jewish genealogists and is certain that he's identified all the best ones. Apart from that, none of us critics of geni have suggested that, in doing genealogy, we seek to hide ourselves or our families. Our concern is that, in putting a family tree on a publicly-accessible internet site such as geni, we lose control over changes or additions that are are made. Our family trees are our work-product. In his blog post,, cited in his message,, Mr. Schoenberg argues in essence that genealogy is done more efficiently, and is more fun, when done with others. But I, and I daresay many other amateur Jewish genealogists, have no desire to expend time or energy dealing with, and potentially disputing with, everyone who makes erroneous and sometimes absurd changes or additions my tree. Heck, I couldn't  even get a close relative to correct wrong information she added! 
While some people may find that the advantages of doing "collaborative" genealogy via geni outweigh the disadvantages of that site, others such as myself reach the opposite cost-benefit conclusion. It seems to me that this matter is of such importance that geni should be up-front with potential users that putting a tree on geni results in a loss of control over its content. Instead, geni hides this within its "policies" verbiage.
I believe that one should be wary of commercial enterprises with stated ambitions to connect the world. Sounds somewhat megalomaniacical, doesn't it?

Stephen Katz
USA


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Eva Lawrence
 

All the letters complaining about Geni are writing of their past
experience. About a year ago it was acquired by My Heritage, and since
then I've found the
managers of people's data very approachable and helpful in correcting
mistakes I've pointed out to them, as well as mistakes I've made
myself.,
even though I only use the basic, free version. In contrast, Ancestry
has just asked me to approve a set of data from someone else's tree
which gave my
grandfather an extra name, a different wife but the correct dates and
children. The only options were:'yes' :' no' or 'maybe', none of which
fitted the bill..

Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Re: Looking for help Zabokrich #ukraine

Marla Waltman
 

Hi Len,

I am the owner of the Zhabokrich KehilaLink on JewishGen. Four years ago I created the webpage, which covers a short history of the town, reminiscences of some people who lived there (including my grandmother Dora (Donya) Kravchek Waltman - 1898-1991), information about the cemetery, surnames of some of the families who lived in the town, Holocaust history, photographs I took when I visited the town in 2013, etc. If you haven't looked at it already, you can find the webpage at: https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/zhabokrich/index.asp. You might be interested in knowing that the town's name means "Frog's croak", which refers to the numerous frogs that lived in the large pond in the 'downtown'. My grandmother spoke of them often! 

Take a look at the KehilaLink and then feel free to contact me about any questions you may have. I would be very happy to know if you could provide information about which of your ancestors lived in Zhabokrich and what you know about them. I would be happy to include your surnames and other information you have to the lists on the website. There are also some published works (a book and some articles) that have been published about Zhabokrich, that I provide information about on the KehilaLink.

Best wishes,
Marla Waltman
Zhabokrich and Kryzhopil KehilaLink leader
Toronto, ON, Canada
Searching: Ukraine: BEGLER, KRAFCHEK, SPEKTOR, WELTMAN
Poland: BALTMAN, BARAN,  LEWKOWICZ, ORGANEK/ORGANKIEWICZ/ORGANICK, USZEROWICZ
Belarus: KRAVCHICK


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Teewinot
 

On 10/28/2020 3:04 PM, Dan Bodenheimer wrote:

Bill, you wrote that someone, "told me his goal was to 'memorialize'
Holocaust victims." and that "this is a term used by the Mormon church
to designate a ceremony in which Jewish victims of the Holocaust are
baptized by the Mormon church."

I do not agree with your premise, as I have a goal of "Memorializing"
Holocaust victims so that they are never forgotten, so that we have
pictures of real people, and so that we all can see that relatives
linked to us were lost. All this makes it more real, and solidifies the
fact that this should Never Happen Again.  I use the term memorialize,
and it has nothing to do with the old LDS baptism issue from many years
ago, which they refer to as "posthumous baptisms" or "proxy baptisms",
not memorials

In accordance with a 1995 agreement, the LDS has removed more than
300,000 names of Jewish Holocaust victims from its databases, as well as
subsequently removing names later identified by Jewish groups in more
recent years (2012).

Additionally, MyHeritage is an Israeli company, headquartered in Or
Yehuda, Israel, and it owns and operates GENI.
FamilySearch is run by the LDS and Ancestry.com was a spin-off from that
and is headquartered in Utah.

Dan Bodenheimer
San Diego, California
I suggest you read the following article:

Mormons are baptizing Holocaust victims, Lubavitcher rebbe and relatives
of celebrities, researcher says
BY JOSEFIN DOLSTEN DECEMBER 22, 2017 2:56 PM

https://tinyurl.com/yyy7ehvy

They didn't stop.

Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

lydgateaction@...
 

It depends, I guess, on what you mean by "genealogy". Some people think that it is somehow impressive to generate trees containing 50,000 people of variable accuracy with all of their 7th cousins.

So what? These are all a meaningless and uninteresting waste of time. At that level you might as well include everyone in the world.  

There are many many issues here that are beyond this thread, including the theft of data about people that are of no real possible interest to the people posting this stuff apart from a macho "big tree" mentality that actually conveys no insight at all. 

However I will mention one issue: you say somewhat disparagingly that "Sadly, some people think genealogy is about hiding yourself and your family." 
Firstly, 7th cousins are not "your family" in any meaningful sense (I have many tends of thousands of 7th cousins). But more importantly, not everyone lives in LA,CA. Sometimes posting tghis sort of information places people you really don't know at substantial risk, including risk of death right now.  

This is not what genealogy is about or should be about. It is bad genealogy. The real tools of genealogy are a note book and a pen and a young person willing to interview their grandparents for private family use. Not garbage and incorrect trees of my family generated by people I couldn't care less about. Geni is hardly the only perpetrator of this type of malfunction - Jewshgen has not exactly covered itself in glory in terms of non-correctable and stolen data. 

Dr Aubrey Blumsohn

Sheffield, UK


Re: Looking for Herman/Hyman Wayler on ships manifest #general #lithuania

Barbara Zimmer
 

How about this man in 1901. 

 

 Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934

 
 
Name: Motel Weiler
Gender: männlich (Male)
Ethnicity/Nationality: Russland (Russian)
Marital status: ledig (Single)
Departure Age: 21
Birth Date: abt 1881
Residence Place: Wilkomir
Departure Date: 15 Jan 1902
Departure Place: Hamburg, Deutschland (Germany)
Arrival Place: New York
Occupation: Händler
Ship Name: Barcelona
 


Blumenthal, Pritzwalk #scandinavia #germany

hanshugo.nilson@...
 

I search information about Moritz BLUMENTHAL born 1835 May 16 in Pritzwalk, Brandenburg, Germany. He emigrated to Stockholm, Sweden c. 1855-60 where he obtained citizenship. He married 1877 a divorced Swedish woman, Anna Maria Natalia Wingstedt, nee Schönbeck, and had with her five children. He also adopted her three children of her earlier marriage. He died in Stockholm 1893 April 20. He seems to have been some sort of a businessman.
I have found three people named BLUMENTHAL born in Pritzwalk: Cäcile Blumenthal CHRON, b. 1818 March 24, d. 1909 Feb 14; her sister Johanna BLUMENTHAL b. 1821 Nov 16, d. 1900 Sep 1; and their father, Israel N. BLUMENTHAL d. in Pritzwalk 1854 Feb 24. The sisters could possibly be sisters (or cousins?) of Moritz. Hopefully somebody could give me some information about the Blumenthals in Pritzwalk.


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Max Heffler
 

Another analogy is Open Source source code. More eyes enables more defects to be found and corrected enhancing the security the code.

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of E. Randol Schoenberg via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 2:07 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

 

I agree with Max.  Geni is by far the best tool we have for Jewish genealogy at the moment.  All of the best Jewish genealogists use it.  How do I know?  Because on Geni we can all see each other's work, correct mistakes and learn new information about resources in our areas of interest.  

Sadly, some people think genealogy is about hiding yourself and your family.  Nothing could be more wrong.  The more you share, the more you will learn.

As for Holocaust victims, we have on Geni various projects concerning the Holocaust, which are another great tool.  See the umbrella project at https://www.geni.com/projects/Holocaust-The-Final-Solution/10996

To learn more about why everyone should be using Geni for building their trees, please see my old blog at https://schoenblog.com/?p=712

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


--

Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)


Re: Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

Max Heffler
 

Nancy,

                Curators are more restricted now for private profiles.

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of Nancy Reicher via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 1:43 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Geni Family Trees - Privacy and Baptism Concerns #general

 

You may be the only honest on of all the curators, then maybe not. I know a curator and he has changed things on my verry small tree that I put up on Geni , when Geni was first alive. The things he has changed are all wrong. He refuses to do anything to help that situation. I am sorry I ever put tose two generations onto Geni. Now My trees, going back to the 1600s are all on my computers. They are shared with relatives only, and I do share very willingly.
--
Nancy L. Reicher
Kansas City MO


--

Max Heffler
Houston, TX
max@...
HEFFLER(Ukraine)/TIRAS(Poland)/WASSEMAN(Lithuania)/MOORE(Poland)/ZLOT(Lithuania)
GORENSTEIN(Ukraine)/FLEISCHMAN(Latvia)/GOLDEN(Lithuania)

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