Date   

Re: Advanced question on family name adoption lists in Baden #germany #records

Ralph Baer
 

In some cases Rosenthal copied the 1809 list and in others the 1815 list. Rarely did he copy both. The 1809 lists only contain ages, not dates of birth. The 1815 lists usually contain the dates of birth at least for children. They may not be correct which can be seen by comparing young children's birth dates with those on birth records.

When i was at the Generallandesarchiv in Karlsruhe, I looked at some of the records which Rosenthal did not copy.

One more thing, some of the microfilms of these records which can be seen using DigiBaeck at the Leo Baeck institute website were microfilmed very light and are difficult to decipher.
--
Ralph N. Baer        RalphNBaer@...       Washington, DC


Re: Help ship records - not all family did entire journey to USA #usa #russia #records #belarus

Stephen Weinstein
 

On Thu, Dec 10, 2020 at 11:31 AM, <mandy.molava@...> wrote:
I wondered if anyone knew if there were any such thing as an 'early leavers ship records' anywhere? 
1. Sometimes the list was prepared in advance, before the ship reached England, and everyone planning to go to the U.S. was put on it, and then those who got off early were crossed out.  So look on the list for the ship from when it reached the U.S., at the crossed out names, and see if she's one of them.
 
2. There are surviving lists of who departed from some ports.  (Ancestry has a good collection of departures from one port in Germany, but most of the passengers show up on the [free] Statue of Liberty / Ellis Island Foundation database of passengers who arrived at New York, so I rarely use it.  But it would be good for your situation, if she left from that port.)
--
Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA
stephenweinstein@...


Looking for birth records of Ezekiel and Max Land in Suwalki #poland #lithuania

kosfiszer8@...
 

Looking for birth records of brothers Ezekiel and Max (do not know his birth name) in the Suwalki Gbernia of Poland/Lithuania in the 1869-1875 period. Ezekiel settled in Virginia and Max in New York. Can not find any documents showing their entry in 1894/1895. Have many records in the USA, with the exception of their entry. The Land brothers may be related to the Haskiel family in Vilkaviskis, Lithuania
Angel Kosfiszer
Richardson, Texas


Trying to make contact with the family of David Rokeach of Montreal family #canada

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to make contact with the children of David Rokeach, died in New
York in 1971, father of a son in Jerusalem, another son of Chicago,
and a daughter.
His first wife was his relative of the Flamm rabbinical family and
remarried his wife in Israel about 1950.
Neil Rosenstein.


Re: Help with the given name "Kuna" (from Belarus) #belarus #names

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Alas, what is a 'real' name. My ggrandmother was one of 20 kids born to a couple in a tiny town in Nassau. On each birth record, the mother's name was different. My ggrandmother was apparently Rachel, but so was her mother (on a different record); when 'Rachel' married my ggrandfather, her name on the marriage record was Regina. Regina was her sister (according to a birth record) and so  was her mother on another birth record.

It seems that women often used a variety of Yiddish and secular names, so who knows if there was a 'real' given name if we asked her. Rachel / Regina's daughter, my grandmother, was Matilda or Aunt Tilly to all who knew her, but her birth record in NYC says Rosa (named for her grandmother, probably, as Reis / Rosa / Rachel / Regina / every other R name you can think of except Rebecca - and Teresa).

Who said genealogy was easy?

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


A Latvian Chanukah Present - Day 4 #latvia

Nancy Siegel
 

A LATVIAN CHANUKAH PRESENT - DAY 4

The Death of Morduch (Maks or Max) Halsman

by Ann Rabinowitz 


In memory of my great uncle Max Hillman, who was born in Bauska, Latvia, and who started me on my genealogical research, which is so long ago now, I am posting a piece about Latvia every day throughout Chanukah. The posts will be about people, events, and daily life. These posts can also be viewed on the JewishGen Blog at: https://www.jewishgen.org/Blog/

 

The Historical Jewish Press website reports not only newspaper items of political, social, and cultural events, but of criminal events as well, especially those which are the result of anti-Semitism or other such incidents.

In this case, it was The Sentinel, Friday, March 22, 1929, Pg. 2, which reported the death of Morduch (Maks or Max) Halsman, who was a wealthy Jewish dentist from Riga, Latvia, who had substantial real estate holdings both in Palestine and Switzerland. 

Halsman was married to Ita Grintuch, a grammar school principal in Riga. Their children were Phillippe Halsman, born May 2, 1906, Riga, and died June 25, 1979, NY, and Liouba Halsman, born 1910, Riga.

On a hiking trip with his son Phillippe in the Zillertal Valley, in the Austrian Tyrol, Morduch was found dead at the bottom of a ravine on September 10, 1928. His son, Phillippe, was charged with patricide for his murder on very circumstantial evidence and with no known motive established. 

As the trial was held in Innsbruck, which was quite a hotbed of anti-Semitic activity, the case caused a controversial political stir with much press being brought against the son. The murder came to be called the Austrian Dreyfus Case. There was even a shepherd who was brought forward who said he saw the son kill his father by pushing him into the ravine. Other anti-Semitic individuals gave testimony against the son and one even kept Max Halsman’s head in a jar as a souvenir.

On the other side, in defense of Phillippe, people such as Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein and other Jewish luminaries supported him. The result was that the trial lasted three days and Phillippe was given 10 years imprisonment. An appeal was made and the second trial followed which gave him 4 years. He was pardoned by Austrian President Miklas and released in October, 1930. 

Upon Phillippe’s release, he and his family went to Paris where Phillippe studied and set up his photographic studio in 1932. Later, he managed to escape the Nazis and reach America in November, 1940, where he became one of the world's most famous celebrity portrait photographers. He is known for capturing the inner essence of such people as Marilyn Monroe and Albert Einstein.

 

A book about Phillippe Halsman and his trials and tribulations has been written by Austin Ratner, entitled “The Jump Artist”. In addition, Ratner has a detailed discussion of the trials that can be found on the following site: 

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/mixed-mu…/righting-wrongs/2/

 

The remarkable life that Phillippe led was such that even Alfred Hitchcock based a 1963 film on it entitled “The Wrong Man”.

You can see many of Halsman's famous photographs on the following site: 

http://philippehalsman.com/



--
Nancy Siegel
Director of Communications
JewishGen.org
(San Francisco, California)
nsiegel@...





Re: RIPSTEIN #canada

Sherri Bobish
 


Paul,

A soundex search of surname RIPSTEIN at:
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/
finds some of these variants:
RAIPSHTEIN
RAIBSHTEYN
RABSHTEIN
RAYBSHTEYN

Have you looked into any of these surnames?

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Help with the given name "Kuna" (from Belarus) #belarus #names

Joseph Hirschfield
 

Kuna is derived from the Old Spanish word for cradle, therefore as a name it implies "childish".
 
The surname Kunin has the same derivation. 

Joe Hirschfield
Portage, MI U.S.A.
 
Minowicki, Minowitzki, Minoff---Brest-Litovsk, Wyosoko-Litovsk, BELARUS
Hirschfeld, Hertzfeld, Buxbaum, Bucksbaum, Lindenbaum--Skwarzava, Gliniany, Sielec Bienkow, Jaryczow Nowy-UKRAINE (Galicia)


What does "Na'az" mean? #names #translation #belarus

Linda Kelley
 

In the 1930s, my Bereskin relatives in Chicago had a blueprint family tree drawn up.
The oldest person on the tree is Na'az Zvie. There are records for him as Girsh, son of Noson, born about 1800, living in Bobruisk, Belarus. Zvi means Hirsh/Girsh, but what about Na'az?
When I enter Naaz into JewishGen Unified search as a given name, there are some men named Noz. That is pretty close, and might refer to his father, Noson. Is there any other logical explanation for the name written as Na'az? Could it be an abbreviation in Hebrew or Yiddish?
Thank you!!
Linda Wolfe Kelley
Portland, OR, USA
 
 
 
 
 


Re: How did my great grandmother travel to Ireland from Kyiv? #ukraine #general

rv Kaplan
 

Interesting Les.  I know there was a Montefiore Shelter for immigrants in Rotterdam, but haven't found records.  In London, there was the Poor Jews Temporary Shelter.

Dr Nicholas Evans in Hull did his PhD in the subject of 'Aliens en route: European Transmigration via the UK, 1836-1914.'  He can probably answer some of these questions.

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow 


On Sat, 12 Dec 2020 at 21:44, <lesliekel18@...> wrote:
I am lucky enough to have travel documents for my family from 1923 for travelling from Zhitomir, Ukraine to Glasgow, Scotland. My family at that time was my grandfather (a widower) and his five children, 4 daughters and one son (my father).

They travelled by train from Zhitomir to Riga to obtain visas from the British Embassy in Riga. They would have had to change trains probably more than once due to the different rail gauges in the different countries. My understanding is that Latvia had a different rail gauge. In Riga they had to obtain visas to travel through Germany and Holland and to enter UK. From Holland they travelled by ferry from Hook of Holland to Harwich. From Harwich I assume that they travelled by train to Glasgow. I would love to know who helped them, who directed them, who translated for them.

The whole question of overland travel from the Pale to the West is very much undocumented, particularly in comparison to sea travel, when there were passenger lists.  Also there is an interesting "untold" story about the assistance that the travellers received on their journey. My aunts had stories about being given clothes in Holland. I tried to research "Immigrant Aid Societies" in Holland but without success.

Les Kelman
Toronto, Canada


Re: Help with the given name "Kuna" (from Belarus) #belarus #names

Harvey Kabaker
 

I have two women in my tree with the given name Kuna. My guess is that it's Yiddish, because it appears in marriage records that show Yiddish names for the husbands, rather than Hebrew names. Probably you will find a lot of material by searching for Kuna in Google as well as the JewishGen name databases for Poland and Lithuania, for example. Also, search for Kuna right here in the main discussion group.

Harvey Kabaker
Silver Spring, Md.
KABAKIER, KABAKER, WEINHOUSE, KOTLARSKY/CUTLER, OKUN, BERLINSKY/BERLUNSKY


Announcing the publication of the Memorial Book of Shebreshin (Szczebrzeszyn, Poland) #poland

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its104th title, 'Memorial Book of Shebreshin"
Translation of Sefer zikaron le-kehilat Shebreshin, Memorial Book to
the Community of Shebreshin

Original Yizkor Book Edited by: Dov Shuval
Association of Former Inhabitants
of Shebreshin in Israel and the Diaspora
Published in Haifa, 1984.

List price: $60.95 available from JewishGen for $34
To order go to: https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Szczebrzeszyn.html

Details:
Hard Cover, 8.5” by 11”, 542 pages with original photographs.
Editor of the original Yizkor Book: Dov Shuval

Layout: Jonathan Wind
Cover Design: Jan R. Fine
Name Indexing: Bena Shklyanoy

Szczebrzeszyn, Poland
is located at 50 deg 42’ N, 22 deg 58’ E 137
miles SE of Warsaw

From the Foreword:
The original Yizkor book of the Shebreshiner community, one of the
more than one thousand Jewish communities in Poland destroyed, is
published 42 years after the massacres in the shtetl, and 39 years
after the defeat of the Nazi regime and the end of the Second World
War. Is it not too late? Is it not in the sense of too little, too
late? Has not everything already been written about the destruction of
Jewish life in Poland? Has the material not already been exhausted? Of
course this sad chapter in the history of our people has not been
forgotten, but everything which has been written up to now has not
emphasized enough the extent of the loss: the tragic end of the
life-giving, thousand year old Jewish existence in Poland. Many yizkor
books of the devastated communities have been published, but it is not
sufficient. Every one of the survivors wants to cherish the memories
of the past, everyone wants to see his own city and story in the book,
wants to immortalize that which is most intimate to him. Every city
and shtetl was a little world of its own, a Jewish world with social
institutions, political parties, organizations, schools, and
synagogues, and a shared tradition. It is all unforgettable and
demands expression. Such was also Shebreshin, a shtetl in the Zamosc
area, Lublin province, which was populated by 8,000 people before the
war, 3,000 of whom were Jews.

Alternate names for the town: Szczebrzeszyn [Polish],
Shebreshin
[Yiddish], Shchebreshin [Russian], Shevershin, Szebrzeszyn, Shabeshin
Nearby Jewish Communities:
Zwierzyniec 7 miles S
Chlaniow 10 miles NNW
Zamossc 12 miles E
Goraj 13 miles W
Frampol 13 miles W
Turobin 14 miles NW
Krasnobrod 15 miles SE
Tarnogora 15 miles NNE
Zolkiewka 15 miles NNW
Izbica 15 miles NE
Bilgoraj 16 miles SW
Chrzanow 16 miles WNW
Jozefow 16 miles S
Gorzkow 17 miles N
Wysokie 20 miles NW

Packed with history; this book opens a unique window to life in this
shtetl. A must-read! Certainly a welcome gift to the relative who
would appreciate this unique history of their shtetl.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Re: How did my great grandmother travel to Ireland from Kyiv? #ukraine #general

lesliekel18@...
 

I am lucky enough to have travel documents for my family from 1923 for travelling from Zhitomir, Ukraine to Glasgow, Scotland. My family at that time was my grandfather (a widower) and his five children, 4 daughters and one son (my father).

They travelled by train from Zhitomir to Riga to obtain visas from the British Embassy in Riga. They would have had to change trains probably more than once due to the different rail gauges in the different countries. My understanding is that Latvia had a different rail gauge. In Riga they had to obtain visas to travel through Germany and Holland and to enter UK. From Holland they travelled by ferry from Hook of Holland to Harwich. From Harwich I assume that they travelled by train to Glasgow. I would love to know who helped them, who directed them, who translated for them.

The whole question of overland travel from the Pale to the West is very much undocumented, particularly in comparison to sea travel, when there were passenger lists.  Also there is an interesting "untold" story about the assistance that the travellers received on their journey. My aunts had stories about being given clothes in Holland. I tried to research "Immigrant Aid Societies" in Holland but without success.

Les Kelman
Toronto, Canada


Re: How did my great grandmother travel to Ireland from Kyiv? #ukraine #general

Dennis Flavell
 

A number of our GUREVITCH family came from the Kiev region c 1900 to England and some onwards to Canada.  By rail to Riga, Latvia, thence boat to Hull, rail to Liverpool via Leeds and Halifax.
From Liverpool to Ireland (Dublin or Belfast) could be your final route.
Dennis Flavell, Cambridgeshire.


Info on Leah/Luba Gertzovsky and possible son/ step son Jack Miller #belarus

Emma Field
 

Hello, my great grandfather was Solomon Gertzovsky.

I have some documents that someone translated for me - 

 

“Looks like draft documents for Zalman Movshovich Gertzovskiy. He was drafted 1898 age 24. He resided in shtetl Dyatlovo in Slonim region Grodno municipality.”

 He married Leah and they had 4 kids including my grandmother. 


One of their children died age 16 and in the burial record it mentions he is mourned by Solomon and Leba. Not Leah. But on their own burial records she is listed as Leah.

Not sure if this is intentional or a mistake. 


Im not sure exactly when my Solomon (Zalman) married Leah and if it was before emigrating to London.

Also I am confused why his surname is 
Movshovich Gertsovsky on the document but went by Gertsovsky only once in London? Can anyone explain?

I would love to find out more about Leah and if her name was also Luba and what her maiden name was and where she came from. Any ideas how I can find out?

One more mystery. I have photos of a Jack Miller who is a half brother to Simon Gertzovsky - the child who died age 16 and is buried in Edmonton, London.

I have no idea who he is and how he came to be half brothers. He is alot older than Simon by the photos. 

I assume if his surname is Miller he was perhaps a child of Leah?? 


I have two photos of Jack Miller in New York and then a photo of Jack with Simon in London. My family lived in London.

So how can I track down where Jack fits in, and who his parents were?

I did try looking on the US federal census for 1920 but i have no real idea which Jack Miller is listed.


Many thanks for any advice!
Emma Field great grand daughter of Solomon Gertzovsky, UK


Help with the given name "Kuna" (from Belarus) #belarus #names

David Gordon
 

My family has always said that my great-grandmother (born 1870 in Borisov) was named Kuna.  I had long doubted that that was her "real" given name but recently discovered one of her travel documents (she came to the US, through Latvia, in 1923) and the US consulate in Riga entered her name on a receipt as "Kouna."  I've poked around and have been unable to find out much about the name.  Can anyone tell me (1) whether it would be a Yiddish (or other) name and (2) whether it is likely to have been her given name?  Many thanks in advance.

David Gordon
Evanston, IL
HORWITZ (Lapichi and Smolevichi, Belarus); GIBALOVITCH (Borisov); GORDON (Butrimonys); HURWITZ (Gomel)


Re: Advanced question on family name adoption lists in Baden #germany #records

d.mayer@...
 

Hi all
I have also used the Berthold Rosenthal documents available online from the Leo Baeck Institute. I have also noticed this document available from Family Search which looks like it could be a copy of the microfilm held in the Generallandesarchiv Karlsruhe. David, could you confirm ?
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS63-VS6B-7?i=25&cat=486426

Unfortunately the document is hard to use because of the way it is assembled. First, all left pages, then all right pages.

Also, I read on one of the old Jewish Gen forums that there were two documents : one in 1809 and one in 1815 and that Berthold Rosenthal only copied the 1809.

Best Regards
Daniel Mayer


Re: Looking for a researcher for records in Romania #bessarabia #records #romania

soring0412@...
 

The Botosani research team has acquired and indexed all available records for Botosani and many other locations in the area. 
You can contact me privately, or join our group on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1465078043774333

Sorin Goldenberg
Israel


Re: Records from Ekaterinoslav, Dnipropetrovs'ka, Ukraine #ukraine

Gary Pokrassa
 

Jake - Alex Krakovsky has the following posted on his wiki page - here are the links:   

Ekaterinoslav County ed. ]

Ekaterinopolya Auditory tales of local peasants of Zvenigorod county 1811 280-2-254
--
Katerinopil The auditory fairy tale of the Jews of the town of Katerinopol. 1806 280-174d-226
Katerinopil Auditory tales of Jews of Zvenigorod county 1816 455-2-2
Katerinopol Metric book of the synagogue of the town of Katerinopol. 1854. Divorce  // CDIAC. F. 1166. Op. 1. Ref. 5.   1166-1-5
Katerinopol Auditory of the Jews of the town of Katerinopol. 1795, 1806  // DAKO. F. 280. Op. 174 (add). Ref. 236   280-174-236
Katerynopil A fairy tale of Jewish merchants and burghers of Zvenigorod district. 1858  // DAKO. F. 280. Op. 2. Ref. 1382 1858 280-2-1382
Katerynopil Additional auditory fairy tale of the burghers of the Jews of Uman, Zvenigorod, Chyhyryn and Cherkasy counties. 1818  // DAKO. F. 280. Op. 2. Ref. 381. 1818 280-2-381
Katerynopil Auditory tales of Christians and Jews of Zvenigorod county. 1834  // DAKO. F. 280. Op. 2. Ref. 572. 1834 280-2-572
Katerynopil, others Family lists of Jews of the Katerynopil Jewish Society and neighboring villages, subject to regular recruitment. 1862  // DAKO. F. 280. Op. 164. Ref. 1134 1862 280-164-1134
Katerynopol Census of Jews in the town of Katerynopol Zvenigorod county. 1875 // DAKO. F. 12. Op. 3. Ref. 612.   12-3-612
Katerynopol Census of Jews Katerynopil and Petrykivskys of Zvenigorod county. 1875 // DAKO. F. 12. Op. 3. Ref. 614.   12-3-614
Gary Pokrassa
Data Acquisition Director
Ukraine Research Division


Re: Help - would children on ships records be named? Or just the adults/adults travelling with them #records #hungary #russia #slovakia

Diane Jacobs
 

Of course, every person is listed.
Diane Jacobs



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "mandy.molava via groups.jewishgen.org" <mandy.molava=aol.com@...>
Date: 12/12/20 8:18 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Help - would children on ships records be named? Or just the adults/adults travelling with them #records #hungary #russia #slovakia

Would anybody know if ships records contained the children travelling with them too? 

thanks in advance
mandy molava
--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey

9201 - 9220 of 662624