Date   

New York Jewish Genealogy Course begins August 4 #romania

Phyllis Kramer
 

Did your family live in New York? There are many interesting research
possibilities in the Big Apple! JewishGen's Intermediate Course,
Breaking Brick Walls in the United States, will focus on New York
Resources. This course will be especially useful to those who visit
NY; we'll have suggestions on where to research, where to wander and
how to get there.

If, despite basic online research (census >from familysearch &
ancestry, vital records >from italiangen) you have not yet found the
Hebrew names, birth year or town for your U.S. immigrant ancestors
consider this course as it focuses on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including naturalization, military and
governmental records, death records (probate, obituaries, cemeteries),
and local archival research.

We are proud to feature a personal mentoring program; students use our
online FORUM, post an ancestral branch, set goals for research, and
work one on one with the instructor. Eight text lessons can be
downloaded to read at your own pace and an optional field trip to a
New York archive will be scheduled. This course is open for
enrollment. PLEASE read the course descriptions and requirements
(8-10 hours per week) on
www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40088
and email any questions.

I look forward to interfacing with every student.
Phyllis Kramer, New York City
VP Education
www.jewishgen.org/education


Romania SIG #Romania New York Jewish Genealogy Course begins August 4 #romania

Phyllis Kramer
 

Did your family live in New York? There are many interesting research
possibilities in the Big Apple! JewishGen's Intermediate Course,
Breaking Brick Walls in the United States, will focus on New York
Resources. This course will be especially useful to those who visit
NY; we'll have suggestions on where to research, where to wander and
how to get there.

If, despite basic online research (census >from familysearch &
ancestry, vital records >from italiangen) you have not yet found the
Hebrew names, birth year or town for your U.S. immigrant ancestors
consider this course as it focuses on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including naturalization, military and
governmental records, death records (probate, obituaries, cemeteries),
and local archival research.

We are proud to feature a personal mentoring program; students use our
online FORUM, post an ancestral branch, set goals for research, and
work one on one with the instructor. Eight text lessons can be
downloaded to read at your own pace and an optional field trip to a
New York archive will be scheduled. This course is open for
enrollment. PLEASE read the course descriptions and requirements
(8-10 hours per week) on
www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40088
and email any questions.

I look forward to interfacing with every student.
Phyllis Kramer, New York City
VP Education
www.jewishgen.org/education


New York Jewish Genealogy Course begins August 4 #yiddish

bounce-3352594-772983@...
 

Did your family live in New York? There are many interesting research
possibilities in the Big Apple! JewishGen's Intermediate Course,
Breaking Brick Walls in the United States, will focus on New York
Resources. This course will be especially useful to those who visit
NY; we'll have suggestions on where to research, where to wander and
how to get there.

If, despite basic online research (census >from familysearch &
ancestry, vital records >from italiangen) you have not yet found the
Hebrew names, birth year or town for your U.S. immigrant ancestors
consider this course as it focuses on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including naturalization, military and
governmental records, death records (probate, obituaries, cemeteries),
and local archival research.

We are proud to feature a personal mentoring program; students use our
online FORUM, post an ancestral branch, set goals for research, and
work one on one with the instructor. Eight text lessons can be
downloaded to read at your own pace and an optional field trip to a
New York archive will be scheduled. This course is open for
enrollment. PLEASE read the course descriptions and requirements
(8-10 hours per week) on
www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40088
and email any questions.

I look forward to interfacing with every student.
Phyllis Kramer, New York City
VP Education
www.jewishgen.org/education


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre New York Jewish Genealogy Course begins August 4 #yiddish

bounce-3352594-772983@...
 

Did your family live in New York? There are many interesting research
possibilities in the Big Apple! JewishGen's Intermediate Course,
Breaking Brick Walls in the United States, will focus on New York
Resources. This course will be especially useful to those who visit
NY; we'll have suggestions on where to research, where to wander and
how to get there.

If, despite basic online research (census >from familysearch &
ancestry, vital records >from italiangen) you have not yet found the
Hebrew names, birth year or town for your U.S. immigrant ancestors
consider this course as it focuses on the more esoteric documents our
ancestors generated, including naturalization, military and
governmental records, death records (probate, obituaries, cemeteries),
and local archival research.

We are proud to feature a personal mentoring program; students use our
online FORUM, post an ancestral branch, set goals for research, and
work one on one with the instructor. Eight text lessons can be
downloaded to read at your own pace and an optional field trip to a
New York archive will be scheduled. This course is open for
enrollment. PLEASE read the course descriptions and requirements
(8-10 hours per week) on
www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40088
and email any questions.

I look forward to interfacing with every student.
Phyllis Kramer, New York City
VP Education
www.jewishgen.org/education


Looking for ENGELBERG, RUDMAN, and GOLDENBERG families #romania

Marilyn Gelber
 

Hello,

I am looking for information about my relatives >from the ENGELBERG and
RUDMAN families, who lived in Czernowitz until the mid-twentieth
century.

I am also looking for my GOLDENBERG relatives >from Czernowitz. Some
of them also lived in Dorna Vatra - now Vatra
Dornei - and possibly in Bacau.

Some of my Goldenberg relatives emigrated to the Haifa area around
1950. One of them had the married name of SCHWARZ (first husband), or
possibly POLLAK (possible second husband). A descendant, Rosa
GUTMAN, lived in Kiryat Tivon in the late 1980's.

Thank you very much to anyone who might be able to provide some
information or leads.

Marilyn G. Gelber, Ph.D.


Romania SIG #Romania Looking for ENGELBERG, RUDMAN, and GOLDENBERG families #romania

Marilyn Gelber
 

Hello,

I am looking for information about my relatives >from the ENGELBERG and
RUDMAN families, who lived in Czernowitz until the mid-twentieth
century.

I am also looking for my GOLDENBERG relatives >from Czernowitz. Some
of them also lived in Dorna Vatra - now Vatra
Dornei - and possibly in Bacau.

Some of my Goldenberg relatives emigrated to the Haifa area around
1950. One of them had the married name of SCHWARZ (first husband), or
possibly POLLAK (possible second husband). A descendant, Rosa
GUTMAN, lived in Kiryat Tivon in the late 1980's.

Thank you very much to anyone who might be able to provide some
information or leads.

Marilyn G. Gelber, Ph.D.


Hungarian citizenship question #hungary

erikagottfried53@...
 

I am in the process of trying to get Hungarian citizenship for myself and my daughter (because of the advantages conferred by Hungaryâ??s membership in the EU), for which I understood that we are eligible because my late father was born in Hungary.

I've gathered nearly all of the documents I was told by a consular official that I would need in order to apply, but I've encountered an obstacle that Iâ??ll describe below. Iâ??m wondering if any H-SIG members have had a similar experience and/or has information or advice they can offer.

The following appears on the New York City Consulate website: "Those who left Hungary before September 1st, 1929 could lose their citizenship by living continuously abroad for a period exceeding 10 years. This 10-year period began after the expiry date in the person's last Hungarian passport. Therefore, in this case, a Hungarian official document (e.g. a passport, a written declaration made in a Hungarian Consulate, etc.) must be produced which would prove that the person kept his/her citizenship.â??

The problem is that my father, who was born in 1919, emigrated to the United States in 1928, with his mother and sister. They had been preceded by my grandfather, who emigrated to the United States in 1921, and made at least one visit back to Hungary between 1921 and 1928.

The conditional wording (â??couldâ?? lose their citizenship rather than â??willâ?? lose their citizenship) is ambiguous. Are there circumstances under which the descendants of someone who left Hungary before September 1rst, 1929 and who lived continuously abroad for more than 10 years after the expiry date on their last Hungarian passport, would still be eligible for Hungarian citizenship? If so, what would those circumstances be? And, since I do not have my familyâ??s Hungarian passports/written declarations, etc., is it possible for me to obtain copies of the relevant ones. If so, where would I find such documents in Hungary? And which documents would be relevant? Would my father, then a 9-year-old boy, have had a passport of his own, or would he perhaps have been included on my grandmotherâ??s or grandfatherâ??s passports? Or mentioned in a declaration made by my grandfather? And what was the expiry date likely to have been for passports issued between the 1920s and late 1940s?

Thanks for your patience, as I know that this question is not strictly relevant to H-SIGâ??s concerns (although answers to questions about the existence of copies of the documents I mentioned could certainly be useful for Hungarian genealogical research). If H-SIG's moderator doesnâ??t think that this query should be answered on H-SIG then kindly contact me offline.

Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, NJ

HUNGARY: Braun Gottfried Klein Reinitz Rozinger Wasserman

Moderator: OK to continue this discussion as long as it does not stray too far beyond
the primary scope of this discussion group.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian citizenship question #hungary

erikagottfried53@...
 

I am in the process of trying to get Hungarian citizenship for myself and my daughter (because of the advantages conferred by Hungaryâ??s membership in the EU), for which I understood that we are eligible because my late father was born in Hungary.

I've gathered nearly all of the documents I was told by a consular official that I would need in order to apply, but I've encountered an obstacle that Iâ??ll describe below. Iâ??m wondering if any H-SIG members have had a similar experience and/or has information or advice they can offer.

The following appears on the New York City Consulate website: "Those who left Hungary before September 1st, 1929 could lose their citizenship by living continuously abroad for a period exceeding 10 years. This 10-year period began after the expiry date in the person's last Hungarian passport. Therefore, in this case, a Hungarian official document (e.g. a passport, a written declaration made in a Hungarian Consulate, etc.) must be produced which would prove that the person kept his/her citizenship.â??

The problem is that my father, who was born in 1919, emigrated to the United States in 1928, with his mother and sister. They had been preceded by my grandfather, who emigrated to the United States in 1921, and made at least one visit back to Hungary between 1921 and 1928.

The conditional wording (â??couldâ?? lose their citizenship rather than â??willâ?? lose their citizenship) is ambiguous. Are there circumstances under which the descendants of someone who left Hungary before September 1rst, 1929 and who lived continuously abroad for more than 10 years after the expiry date on their last Hungarian passport, would still be eligible for Hungarian citizenship? If so, what would those circumstances be? And, since I do not have my familyâ??s Hungarian passports/written declarations, etc., is it possible for me to obtain copies of the relevant ones. If so, where would I find such documents in Hungary? And which documents would be relevant? Would my father, then a 9-year-old boy, have had a passport of his own, or would he perhaps have been included on my grandmotherâ??s or grandfatherâ??s passports? Or mentioned in a declaration made by my grandfather? And what was the expiry date likely to have been for passports issued between the 1920s and late 1940s?

Thanks for your patience, as I know that this question is not strictly relevant to H-SIGâ??s concerns (although answers to questions about the existence of copies of the documents I mentioned could certainly be useful for Hungarian genealogical research). If H-SIG's moderator doesnâ??t think that this query should be answered on H-SIG then kindly contact me offline.

Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, NJ

HUNGARY: Braun Gottfried Klein Reinitz Rozinger Wasserman

Moderator: OK to continue this discussion as long as it does not stray too far beyond
the primary scope of this discussion group.


Finding the missing link - from 1848 census records to 1885 birth records #hungary

arik.solomon@...
 

Fellow SIGers,

For sometime now I'm trying to trace another generation back >from my
g-grandfather to no avail.
Recently H-SIG transcribers (thanks a lot!!!) have uploaded a new
batch of the 1848 census records and for a moment I though I had a
breakthrough. However, it looks like I still have a gap I can't find
the way to bridge over - and this is where I call for your help.

My g-grandfather Marton SALAMON was born in Bikszad, Satmar megye in
1885 to Levi SALAMON (probably a misspell for Leib/Laibu) and Pepi nee
KLEIN.
Searching the 1848 census, I've found a possible match for Marton's
grandfather - Marton SALAMON, born in Liszka, Galicia in 1796 married
circa 1840 to Borcza JAKOB, born in Krassó (Szamoskrassó) in 1816.

Now in order to find Marton Jr.'s father I tried searching all
available databases for Levi/Leib SALAMON birth, marriage or death
records to find a clue regarding his kids or parents but found nothing
relevant.

Question is where and how can I find the missing link between Marton
SALAMON (Bikszad, 1885) and Marton SALAMON (Liszka, 1796).

Any clue, tip or advice will be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Arik Solomon
ISRAEL
Fellow SIGers,

For sometime now I'm trying to trace another generation back >from my
g-grandfather to no avail.
Recently H-SIG transcribers (thanks a lot!!!) have uploaded a new
batch of the 1848 census records and for a moment I though I had a
breakthrough. However, it looks like I still have a gap I can't find
the way to bridge over - and this is where I call for your help.

My g-grandfather Marton SALAMON was born in Bikszad, Satmar megye in
1885 to Levi SALAMON (probably a misspell for Leib/Laibu) and Pepi nee
KLEIN.
Searching the 1848 census, I've found a possible match for Marton's
grandfather - Marton SALAMON, born in Liszka, Galicia in 1796 married
circa 1840 to Borcza JAKOB, born in Krass=C3=B3 (Szamoskrass=C3=B3) in 1816=
.

Now in order to find Marton Jr.'s father I tried searching all
available databases for Levi/Leib SALAMON birth, marriage or death
records to find a clue regarding his kids or parents but found nothing
relevant.

Question is where and how can I find the missing link between Marton
SALAMON (Bikszad, 1885) and Marton SALAMON (Liszka, 1796).

Any clue, tip or advice will be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Arik Solomon
ISRAEL


Hungary SIG #Hungary Finding the missing link - from 1848 census records to 1885 birth records #hungary

arik.solomon@...
 

Fellow SIGers,

For sometime now I'm trying to trace another generation back >from my
g-grandfather to no avail.
Recently H-SIG transcribers (thanks a lot!!!) have uploaded a new
batch of the 1848 census records and for a moment I though I had a
breakthrough. However, it looks like I still have a gap I can't find
the way to bridge over - and this is where I call for your help.

My g-grandfather Marton SALAMON was born in Bikszad, Satmar megye in
1885 to Levi SALAMON (probably a misspell for Leib/Laibu) and Pepi nee
KLEIN.
Searching the 1848 census, I've found a possible match for Marton's
grandfather - Marton SALAMON, born in Liszka, Galicia in 1796 married
circa 1840 to Borcza JAKOB, born in Krassó (Szamoskrassó) in 1816.

Now in order to find Marton Jr.'s father I tried searching all
available databases for Levi/Leib SALAMON birth, marriage or death
records to find a clue regarding his kids or parents but found nothing
relevant.

Question is where and how can I find the missing link between Marton
SALAMON (Bikszad, 1885) and Marton SALAMON (Liszka, 1796).

Any clue, tip or advice will be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Arik Solomon
ISRAEL
Fellow SIGers,

For sometime now I'm trying to trace another generation back >from my
g-grandfather to no avail.
Recently H-SIG transcribers (thanks a lot!!!) have uploaded a new
batch of the 1848 census records and for a moment I though I had a
breakthrough. However, it looks like I still have a gap I can't find
the way to bridge over - and this is where I call for your help.

My g-grandfather Marton SALAMON was born in Bikszad, Satmar megye in
1885 to Levi SALAMON (probably a misspell for Leib/Laibu) and Pepi nee
KLEIN.
Searching the 1848 census, I've found a possible match for Marton's
grandfather - Marton SALAMON, born in Liszka, Galicia in 1796 married
circa 1840 to Borcza JAKOB, born in Krass=C3=B3 (Szamoskrass=C3=B3) in 1816=
.

Now in order to find Marton Jr.'s father I tried searching all
available databases for Levi/Leib SALAMON birth, marriage or death
records to find a clue regarding his kids or parents but found nothing
relevant.

Question is where and how can I find the missing link between Marton
SALAMON (Bikszad, 1885) and Marton SALAMON (Liszka, 1796).

Any clue, tip or advice will be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Arik Solomon
ISRAEL


Translation requests - please specify language #poland

Nicole Heymans <Nicole.Heymans@...>
 

Hello to all SIGgers,

Please be kind to the siggers who are willing to spend time
deciphering and translating records >from Poland. As a consequence of
the several partitions of Poland, these records come in several
languages and as many handwritings depending on the location and even
period (Polish - latin, German - Altschrift, Russian - Cyrillic).

Recognizing the language and writing is far much less of a challenge
than deciphering and translating. Paragraph-type records (often in
Polish and Russian) usually begin with the same words, recognizable
even if unreadable. Table-type records (usually in German) have
standard column headings in recognizable fonts.

It would be kind to the decipherers and translators, if the posters
specified language in the subject of their message. It doesn't really
matter whether the poster is certain the specified language is
correct - if not some siggers will chime in and eventually there will
be an agreement.

I admit I tend to ignore translation requests that do not specify language.

Happy hunting nevertheless,

Nicole Heymans, near Brussels, Belgium


JRI Poland #Poland Translation requests - please specify language #poland

Nicole Heymans <Nicole.Heymans@...>
 

Hello to all SIGgers,

Please be kind to the siggers who are willing to spend time
deciphering and translating records >from Poland. As a consequence of
the several partitions of Poland, these records come in several
languages and as many handwritings depending on the location and even
period (Polish - latin, German - Altschrift, Russian - Cyrillic).

Recognizing the language and writing is far much less of a challenge
than deciphering and translating. Paragraph-type records (often in
Polish and Russian) usually begin with the same words, recognizable
even if unreadable. Table-type records (usually in German) have
standard column headings in recognizable fonts.

It would be kind to the decipherers and translators, if the posters
specified language in the subject of their message. It doesn't really
matter whether the poster is certain the specified language is
correct - if not some siggers will chime in and eventually there will
be an agreement.

I admit I tend to ignore translation requests that do not specify language.

Happy hunting nevertheless,

Nicole Heymans, near Brussels, Belgium


Re: New Data for Galician Towns Added to JRI-Poland Database #general

Israel P
 

On 22 March, Mark Halpern announced a list of newly available records on
JRI-Poland, including Skalat deaths 1908-1915 and Rozdol births 1907-1915.

Those actual records are now online. I imagine the others are as well.

This is much sooner that anyone expected. Way to go, folks.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


JRI Poland #Poland Re: New Data for Galician Towns Added to JRI-Poland Database #poland

Israel P
 

On 22 March, Mark Halpern announced a list of newly available records on
JRI-Poland, including Skalat deaths 1908-1915 and Rozdol births 1907-1915.

Those actual records are now online. I imagine the others are as well.

This is much sooner that anyone expected. Way to go, folks.

Israel Pickholtz
Jerusalem


Re: Question: Soviet Forced Labor Sites for Polish Jews? #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Linda Chism wrote:

<<Could persons on this list manager please help me learn more about
where the Soviets used captured Polish Jews as forced labor? I am
particularly interested if there are any records of forced Jewish workers
at Soviet Tank Factories (as I'm helping friend's family learn a bit more
about a relative.) The man in question would have been a skilled
machinist before he was forced into labor and sent East into the Soviet
Union in 1939/1940 timeframe by the Soviets.>>

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Linda,

Soviet tanks were manufactured in the several facilities:

Factories in Ural regions in towns: Sverdlovsk, town Nizhniy Tagil
(Sverdlovsk region) the large Soviet tanks fabricator, Omsk and
Chelabinsk.

Tanks have also been manufactured in the European part of USSR in
towns Mytishchi and Kirov (Moscov region), Charkov, Gorki, Leningrad
and Stalingrad.

Hope this helps.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: Question: Soviet Forced Labor Sites for Polish Jews? #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Linda Chism wrote:

<<Could persons on this list manager please help me learn more about
where the Soviets used captured Polish Jews as forced labor? I am
particularly interested if there are any records of forced Jewish workers
at Soviet Tank Factories (as I'm helping friend's family learn a bit more
about a relative.) The man in question would have been a skilled
machinist before he was forced into labor and sent East into the Soviet
Union in 1939/1940 timeframe by the Soviets.>>

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Linda,

Soviet tanks were manufactured in the several facilities:

Factories in Ural regions in towns: Sverdlovsk, town Nizhniy Tagil
(Sverdlovsk region) the large Soviet tanks fabricator, Omsk and
Chelabinsk.

Tanks have also been manufactured in the European part of USSR in
towns Mytishchi and Kirov (Moscov region), Charkov, Gorki, Leningrad
and Stalingrad.

Hope this helps.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


HOFFMANN family search in Le Havre and Paris #france

Lemberski Evelyne
 

HOFFMANN family search in haven and Paris

I would like to know if you know the death dates for the following
two persons who resided at 3 rue de la fontaine in Le Havre:
Jacob HOFFMANN born on 10 August 1874 in Ibraila (Romania)
Miriam VINITZKY born on 11 April 1880 in Odessa (Ukraine)

Are there descendants for the following persons
Isidore HOFFMANN was born on October 17, 1918 in Le HAvre having
lived 3 rue de la fontaine in ln Le Havre.
Roger HOFFMANN born on June 6, 1909 in Le Havre and upholsterer
in 1939. He lived 3 street of the fountain in Le Havre.
Henri HOFFMANN born on March 22, 1907 in the harbor of commerce,
employee in 1939 being at the end of the World War at 47 rue Docteur Roux
in Paris. He divorced in 1948 and remarried with Simone ROTTMANN in 1949.

Do not hesitate to contact me

Evelyne Lemberski
Saint Maurice
(France)


MODERATOR NOTE: Please use capital letters for family names to make them
more easily seen.


French SIG #France HOFFMANN family search in Le Havre and Paris #france

Lemberski Evelyne
 

HOFFMANN family search in haven and Paris

I would like to know if you know the death dates for the following
two persons who resided at 3 rue de la fontaine in Le Havre:
Jacob HOFFMANN born on 10 August 1874 in Ibraila (Romania)
Miriam VINITZKY born on 11 April 1880 in Odessa (Ukraine)

Are there descendants for the following persons
Isidore HOFFMANN was born on October 17, 1918 in Le HAvre having
lived 3 rue de la fontaine in ln Le Havre.
Roger HOFFMANN born on June 6, 1909 in Le Havre and upholsterer
in 1939. He lived 3 street of the fountain in Le Havre.
Henri HOFFMANN born on March 22, 1907 in the harbor of commerce,
employee in 1939 being at the end of the World War at 47 rue Docteur Roux
in Paris. He divorced in 1948 and remarried with Simone ROTTMANN in 1949.

Do not hesitate to contact me

Evelyne Lemberski
Saint Maurice
(France)


MODERATOR NOTE: Please use capital letters for family names to make them
more easily seen.


Re: Austrian soldier fighting for Germany - Summary of replies #germany

Jeffrey Knisbacher
 

I just wanted to thank several people who responded to this. I would
note two responses, in particular, that may be of general interest. One
noted that Hitler, an Austrian by birth, had tried to volunteer in the
Austrian army but was rejected. He then turned to the German army which
accepted him, suggesting there was no problem with Austrians fighting
for Germany. Another noted that an Israeli lecturer had once given a
talk in which he said Jews were put into their own separate units in the
German army and then sent to the most difficult fronts, where they
naturally suffered more casualties than they would have otherwise.

Jeff Knisbacher j2456@verizon.net


German SIG #Germany Re: Austrian soldier fighting for Germany - Summary of replies #germany

Jeffrey Knisbacher
 

I just wanted to thank several people who responded to this. I would
note two responses, in particular, that may be of general interest. One
noted that Hitler, an Austrian by birth, had tried to volunteer in the
Austrian army but was rejected. He then turned to the German army which
accepted him, suggesting there was no problem with Austrians fighting
for Germany. Another noted that an Israeli lecturer had once given a
talk in which he said Jews were put into their own separate units in the
German army and then sent to the most difficult fronts, where they
naturally suffered more casualties than they would have otherwise.

Jeff Knisbacher j2456@verizon.net

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