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Re: German labor camps/detention centers in 1933-34 #germany #holocaust

Lewis, Megan
 

Volume I of the Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos 1933-1945 published by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum includes the early camps.  While the articles do not list prisoners' names they do include footnotes and suggestions for further reading.  You can download the entire volume for free at https://www.ushmm.org/collections/plan-a-research-visit/electronic-resources#encyclopedias.  The early camps are in Part A.

You can search for oral histories, archival materials, publications, photographs and historic film in the Museum's Collections Search catalog https://collections.ushmm.org.

Megan Lewis


Re: Looking for family members in Volunskaya gubernia ( now Ukraine) 1800-1900. #ukraine

Sherri Bobish
 


Marina,

The modern name for Poritzk appears to be Pavlivka, Ukraine.
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=A0013

Try searching The JewishGen Ukraine Database https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Ukraine/
You can search by surname or town name.  It's usually better to do a soundex search on the surname, as names got spelled in variant ways.

Hope this helps,

Sherri Bobish


Re: German labor camps/detention centers in 1933-34 #germany #holocaust

Lewis, Megan
 

Hello Eleanor,

Since your father-in-law was from Berlin I suggest starting with http://www.wga-datenbank.de/ which is an index of restitution files from the Berlin office.

Megan Lewis
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


Re: Where can I find information about Uzava Ukraine #ukraine

Sherri Bobish
 


Hi Michelle,

I don't find Uzava in the JewishGen Communities or Gazeteer databases.   However, a soundex search at the Communities database https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp
found two possibilities in Ukraine:  https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/jgcd.php
Osova and Irshava.

You can search The JewishGen Ukraine Database https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Ukraine/
by surname or town name.  I suggest doing a soundex search on the surname as they get spelled variant ways.

Hope this helps,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Question about a matzeva: is Samuel mis-spelled or is a Yiddish alternative used? #names

Peter Cohen
 

In addition to the answers described below, one does find mis-spellings from time to time. On my father's headstone (d. 1959) his name Ruvain is mis-spelled in that the aleph, which is supposed to follow the initial letter resh, is missing. Why? Apparently it happened because my mother asked my oldest brother (who was 14 at the time) to provide the spelling when she ordered the monument.  So, there are all kinds of reasons why names can be mis-spelled on a matzeva (including lack of space).
--
Peter Cohen
California


Re: Ethical Responsibilities of Genealogical Organizations during the Global COVID-19 Pandemic #education #guidelines

Judi Gyory Missel
 

As the Lead Co-Chair for the 2021 IAJGS Conference, I would like to share information about our Conference and health concerns...
After the success of the all-virtual 2020 Conference, some sessions will again be offered virtually in 2021. While we anticipate an in-person conference, contingency plans are in place for any eventuality. The Conference is over six months away and we are working with local health guidelines to continue evaluating our path. The health and safety of all registrants, sponsors, exhibitors, and staff is deeply important, and we appreciate your patience as we make the best determination for this conference.

Judi Gyory Missel
Arizona USA
2021 IAJGS Conference Lead Co-Chair
 


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #yizkorbooks #poland

Bruce Drake
 

“As I finish writing these words I am just 55 years old. I find myself satisfied in rich, large America. However, I am still in exile. I remained the only one of my family, the inheritance of my family – the ash dispersed over the world, that is a part of the six million annihilated Jewry. I absorb this. I will carry this for as long as my eyes see the world.”
So wrote Rafal Federman in a chapter titled “From My Life” from the Yizkor book of “The Jews of Czestochowa, Poland which was published in 1947. She was born in a struggling household in the 1890s and lived through a pogrom in 1902. She went on to live an increasingly political life including risking herself to preserve stores of illegal literature written in Yiddish, and then became an active member of the Polish Bund, a socialist party which promoted the autonomy of Jewish workers, sought to combat antisemitism and was generally opposed to Zionism.
Like many Polish Jews in 1939, she was one of an estimated 15,000 Polish Jews who found temporary refuge in politically independent Lithuania, most of them in Vilna. But ultimately, she and her comrades found themselves in danger there, and she escaped to America. But still in her heart was what she left behind.


Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: Ethical Responsibilities of Genealogical Organizations during the Global COVID-19 Pandemic #education #guidelines

LAURENCE HARRIS
 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2021 at 11:21 AM, Sarah L Meyer wrote:
While I did not attend, because of a conflict.  The IAJGS conference last summer was VIRTUAL, as were my actuarial conferences.  I think unless you have personal knowledge of some genealogical in-person conference, this question is moot.
Sarah

I beg to differ. This question is not moot. 

This is an incredibly important topic in many respects.  Whilst I am based in the UK, I believe that the issues are the same in most countries around the globe.  The issues are certainly not restricted to IAJGS conferences, but apply to all genealogy societies who intend, in the future, to return to in-person events when it is safe to do so; and to all individuals who may wish to attend an in-person event (large or small - genealogy or other)  in the future. 

Covid-19 will be with us a long time, but when the infection levels decline significantly and all who want have been vaccinated and we have better treatments, we shall hopefully reach a point when we can again hold in-person events.  At that point, genealogy societies will have an obligation to let potential attendees know what precautions are going to be taken at each event, and how to find out about the infection levels and other relevant information, so that each person has adequate information on which to base their own personal  attendance decision.  We may not be in a position to restart in-person events just yet, but we have responsibilities to plan and to make information available.

I am on the Council of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain and, despite having temporarily moved all our events digital (via Zoom) since mid March 2020, we have already started preparing for the time when we are permitted to meet in-person, and we consider it sufficiently low risk to offer in-person meetings.  No in-person meetings will be completely free of all Covid risks but we can make a big difference in reducing the risks.  By October 2020, the Covid-19 Committee of our Society had already developed a detailed Covid-19 Safety plan and checklist which was then approved by our Council.  When the time is right, and before restarting with any in-person event we shall update this plan.  Communication with potential event attendees will be essential, and we have already a draft document prepared, to be sent to potential event attendees, setting out relevant event details so they can each make their own informed decision on attendance.

For genealogy societies like ours, normally hosting more than 20 in person events each year, and also considering offering to host an international genealogy conference in the future, Jeffrey's comments and suggestions are very useful.

On a slightly different note, I believe that "hybrid events" offering attendees the opportunity for both in-person and remote attendance and participation at the same event, will be a big part of solving the problem of how we can return to in-person genealogy events in the future.

Laurence Harris
London, England


Re: Looking for a researcher in L'viv to access a record #galicia #records

sjgwed@...
 

I, too, recommend Alex Dunai. In 2006 he was my guide through Lvov, Chernivitski and small towns in western Ukraine. You can read about him in my book, BECAUSE OF EVA: A Jewish Genealogical Journey.

Good luck!

Susan Gordon - New York
BIALAZURKER - Zbaraza
LEMPERT -- Lvov, Skalat, Chernivitski (Czernowitz)


Maisons-Laffitte internment camp #france

Paul Gottlieb
 

My father was held at the Maisons-Laffitte internment/registration camp outside Paris for at least a few weeks, if not more, as the war began. He was Austrian, and thus considered to be an "enemy alien" at the time. However, I have found very little information on-line about this camp other than the image of a single postcard and a reference that Jews were held in the stables.
Any further information about this camp (or suggestions on where to look) would be appreciated. Also, does anyone think that a listing of prisoners is still obtainable? Thanks in advance.
Paul Gottlieb
New York City


Re: Immigrant ships that never made it to America #general

michele shari
 

My friend's "mum" is from Glasgow and told me the same thing. She was born in Vienna and when she left and boarded a ship they landed in Scotland and told them it was the US, and since they spoke English, it made sense.
Michele Farkas
Boynton Beach, FL (formerly NY)
Researching Farkas, Izsak, Stauber/Stober/Shtober, Ganz, Malek
Romania (Marmoros) and Hungary and anywhere else they may have gone!


Re: Ethical Responsibilities of Genealogical Organizations during the Global COVID-19 Pandemic #education #guidelines

Sarah L Meyer
 

While I did not attend, because of a conflict.  The IAJGS conference last summer was VIRTUAL, as were my actuarial conferences.  I think unless you have personal knowledge of some genealogical in-person conference, this question is moot.
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Re: Question about a matzeva: is Samuel mis-spelled or is a Yiddish alternative used? #names

David S STERN
 

Thanks to all who noted that the name on the stone is not Shmuel at all but Shimon.  

I have done a good deal of family history research in both US and old country sources, so I am very accustomed to confusion about names.  But in this case Shmuel was a Hebrew name that should have been well known and not infrequently used in the family.  It was a stable family, and Sam was present, almost assuredly, for both of his sons' bar mitzvahs (and of course for all six children's births and other life cycle events).

I’ve checked with my father and my uncle and both say unhesitatingly that their Hebrew names are “… ben Shmuel,” and my uncle’s oldest son is named Shmuel ben Eliezer, after his grandfather Sam.  The understanding that Sam’s Hebrew name was Shmuel was not handed down by family members who didn’t know better. It must have come from Sam himself.

Because of the stability, all of the life cycle events occurred under the auspices of the same shul in Shreveport, LA.  I am now looking to see if there are records that confirm Shimon was Sam's Hebrew name or if the understanding of his whole family that his Hebrew name was Shmuel is born out.  Let's hope we are able to find something.  There is a possibility that the matzeva is mistaken since it is not original.  The original one fell and broke decades ago and was replaced by the one in the photograph about 2000.

Or, as one of my cousins put it, maybe this poor family got the stone at a steep discount ...

 

David Stern


Re: Question about a matzeva: is Samuel mis-spelled or is a Yiddish alternative used? #names

sharon yampell
 

My great grandfather was indeed Shmuel and in English Samuel… his brother came here with the Hebrew name of Shlomo but when he ran into a potential problem, he changed his name completely to Samuel and a different last name…for researchers unfamiliar to the story would surely be confused as to why two brothers had the same first name and different last names if they were indeed full brothers…

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, New Jersey

 

From: Shlomo Katz
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2021 9:55 AM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Question about a matzeva: is Samuel mis-spelled or is a Yiddish alternative used? #names

 

I had a great-uncle named Shimon (like the person whose tombstone is shown), who went by Sam.
I had another great-uncle named Shlomo, who also went by Sam.
My father-in-law is Shabse, and he too goes by Sam.
A common error in researching is to assume there is a one-to-one correlation of Hebrew and English name.

Shlomo Katz (named after the above-mentioned Sam, but do I not use that name) 
Silver Spring, MD

 


Steinhart descendants from Rozwadow - Tarnobrzeg #poland

Inacio Steinhardt
 

I am seeking contacts with descendants from the Steinhardt's from te Jewish community of ROZWADOW (Tarnobrzeg)
Inacio Steinhardt
inacio@...


Re: Question about a matzeva: is Samuel mis-spelled or is a Yiddish alternative used? #names

David Harrison
 

The answer to the question as to the use of Sam by people who had been Shimon, Shlomo or Shabse is really simple.  They have changed to a name which they think is more suitable within their new situation, but which uses the same initial letter and therefore does not need them to change their signature.  This is the same logic that caused my Great-grandfather to change from Hertog  (in Amsterdam) to Henry (in London).  If an ancestor has crossed a language frontier this is the norm.  It is not necessary that it is the result of a mis-heard name by a clerk at the border.  Though clerks in higher places can also make mistakes; as did the royal clerk who made a family living in Derbyshire the Dukes of Devonshire.  This change of name whilst retaining the Initial is also common amongst the criminal community according to people who study forensic linguistics.

David Harrison
Birmingham UK

Searching in London, UK, the Netherlands and Friesland for VAN RYN,  DE YOUNGE, DRIELSMA, DUPARC, DUQUE, HYMAN, MYERS,PIMONTEL, ROCO and SREPHANY. 


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Shlomo Katz <shlomodkatz@...>
Sent: 22 January 2021 12:55
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Question about a matzeva: is Samuel mis-spelled or is a Yiddish alternative used? #names
 
I had a great-uncle named Shimon (like the person whose tombstone is shown), who went by Sam.
I had another great-uncle named Shlomo, who also went by Sam.
My father-in-law is Shabse, and he too goes by Sam.
A common error in researching is to assume there is a one-to-one correlation of Hebrew and English name.

Shlomo Katz (named after the above-mentioned Sam, but do I not use that name) 
Silver Spring, MD


Obermayer Awards Monday, January 25, 2021: An Invitation #announcements #germany

Karen Franklin
 


Re: ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #translation #poland

ryabinkym@...
 

In Russian:

 

160

Порозов

Состоялось в городе Ломжа 19-го сентября(1-го октября) ноября 1898 года в 4 часа по полудни.  Явилсь лично жители города Ломжа учителя: Абрам-Довид Шейн, 46-и лет и Малкель Ружа 57-и лет и объявили, что вчера, в городе Ломжа, в 4 часа по полудни,  умер Меер-Ицко Вайнштейн, 50-и лет, житель местечка Порозов Волковыского уезда Гродненской губернии, имеющий сынов Лейба и Эле (возможно), супругов Вайнштейн, оставив после себя овдовевшую жену Хану-Розу Абрамовну, урожденную Финке. По настоящему удостоверяю о кончине Меера-Ицко Вайнштейна.  Акт сей присутствующим прочитан, ими и нами подписан.

Абрам-Довид Шейн

Малкель Ружа

Чиновник гражданского состояния, президент города Ломжа        Подпись

 

Translated into English:

160

Porozov

It took place in the town of Lomza on September 19 (October 1) November 1898 at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. The residents of the town of Lomza, the teachers: Abram-Dovid Shein, 46 years old, and Malkel Ruza, 57 years old, personally appeared and announced that yesterday, in the town of Lomza, at 4 pm, Meer-Itsko Weinstein, 50 years old, had died. a resident of the town of Porozov, Volkovysk district, Grodno province, who has sons Leib and Ele (possibly), spouses Weinstein, leaving behind his widowed wife Khana-Roza Abramovna, nee Finke. I truly certify the death of Meer-Itsko Weinstein. This act was read to those present, they and we signed.

Abram-Dovid Shane

Malkel Rouge

Civil Status Official, President of Lomza City Signature

Comment:

Khana-Roza Abramovna, nee Finke mean: Khana-Roza, daughter of Abram, nee Finke.

Translated by Michael Ryabinky
Columbus, OH


Re: translation of headstone needed from Hebrew #translation #israel

binyaminkerman@...
 

Here is buried an outstanding man in (knowledge of ) Torah and good character traits, the Rabbi Yitzchak Yaakov son of Reb Aryeh Lipson of blessed memory. Died 9th of Sivan 5702. May his soul be bound in the bonds of life.

The title Reb doesn't signify being a Rabbi and is an honorific. Yitzchak Yaakov's title suggests he may have actually been ordained as a Rabbi, but it could also be an honorific. The date corresponds to either May 24th after sunset or the day of the 25th, 1942.
Binyamin Kerman
BaltimoreMD


Re: translation of headstone needed from Hebrew #translation #israel

kassells@...
 

Hi Deborah  

Here is the translation 

Here lies
An remarkable man by his Torah and good manners
Rabbi
Jacob Issac 
Son of Arieh
LIPSON 

Passed away on the 9th of Sivan 5702 (May 12 1942 ) 
May his soul attached to the bundle of the living 

Best regards  

Laurent  Kassel 
Moreshet , Israel 

7381 - 7400 of 662157