Date   

Re: Cemetery Photos: Mt. Sharon Cemetery, Springfield, PA #photographs #usa

Kenneth Ryesky
 

Problem with Mt. Sharon is that the office is frequently unstaffed (at least it was on the occasions (plural) I tried to get photos about 6 years ago).

Problem with the Find-a-Grave website is that once a photo request is submitted, only two things can happen:  (1) Request gets fulfilled; or (2) Request does not get fulfilled.  If #1, then all is well (assuming that the photo is clear and the photographer knew what he/she was doing).  If #2, then no new requests are accepted, and only the requester can cancel the request.  So if there is a previous request for that particular grave, then you cannot nudge anyone to pick up on a stale request.

-- KHR
--
Ken Ryesky,  Petach Tikva, Israel     kenneth.ryesky@... 

Researching:
RAISKY/REISKY, ARONOV, SHKOLNIK(OV), AEROV; Gomel, Belarus
GERTZIG, BRODSKY; Yelizavetgrad, Ukraine
BRODSKY, VASILESKY; Odessa, Ukraine
IZRAELSON, ARSHENOV; Yevpatoriya, Ukraine (Crimea)


Re: Where are the HIAS archives? #records #general

Susan&David
 

Try here:
https://www.hias.org/records-search-requests

David Rosen
Bosto, MA



On 1/26/2021 9:49 AM, relly800@... wrote:
Does anyone know where ae the HIAS records from WW2 and post War kept? Are they searchable online? 
After the war my parents search for family members most likely also thru HIAS, they may have also received services as refugees in Poland, Russia, and DP camp.
Thanks,
Relly Coleman
FUDALOWICZ
WASSERSTEIN
FELD
WARSZAWSKI


Re: Naming Conventions #names

Simon Zelman
 

This was much more common in the USSR. My uncle was named Dmitry in honor of his grandfather  David, my father was named Aleksandr (Sanya/Sasha as a diminutive) after his grandfather Zyama. I was named Simon after my great grandmother Sonya.

Simon Zelman
San Francisco, CA


Migration from Suwalki Gubernia To S.C. #poland #lithuania

Alan Banov
 

My father's ancestors migrated from the Suwalki Gubernia, mostly from Kopcheve, not Kapciamiestis, Lithuania, to Charleston, S.C.
My great grandfather's nephew Isaac Wolf Banovitch was the first to start that migration.
Does anyone know why Jews from that area went to Charleston in particular?
Thanks.
Alan Banov


Re: Naming Conventions #names

David Harrison
 

I have met several cases of the first son of all the brothers were given the name of their father.  as a result, as an example the eldest son in alternate generations were all named David.  Because these were of a very similar birth date, I have always tried to verify the name of the Mother.  There is then a problem if the wives of Brothers (from different families) had the same given name, except in the Netherlands where women keep their Maiden name in Marriage.  Netherland family history also has the advantage that a Census is not one day in 10 years but is a diary of all the changes in the household over the decade, with comings and goings cross-referenced to that of the earlier or later address.
David Harrison, Birmingham UK
Searching VAN RYN, DRIELSMA, HYMAN. STEPHANY, DE YOUNG


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Carl Kaplan via groups.jewishgen.org <carl.kaplan=ymail.com@...>
Sent: 26 January 2021 00:19
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Naming Conventions #names
 
Given the custom of naming a child after a deceased relative using only the first letter of the name:

1. Would it be acceptable for males to be named after females, and females after males?
2. Was it acceptable to name multiple children in the same immediate family after the same relative, using just the first letters of the names?

Thank you.
--
Carl Kaplan

KAPLAN Minsk, Belarus
EDELSON, EDINBURG Kovno, Lithuania
HOFFERT, BIENSTOCK< BIENENSTOCK Kolbuszowa, Galicia
STEINBERG, KLINGER, WEISSBERG, APPELBERG Bukaczowce, Galicia


Re: Krakow records #records #galicia

Geoffrey Weisgard
 

I have found several references to Eva (Wiszka) Jules who was a member of the Jewish Underground (ZOB) in Krakow. Could Jules and Jalas be the same family?

Geoffrey Weisgard
Manchester, UK


Re: Cemetery Photos: Mt. Sharon Cemetery, Springfield, PA #photographs #usa

Fred Kolbrener
 

Mount Sharon Cemetery is 68% photographed already per its entry in Findagrave.com (https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/45540/mount-sharon-cemetery/photo).  Chances are that some of your relatives' burials have already been photographed.  If not, you can join the site (it's free) and update or enter data on their burials and then request a photo be taken by one of the 696 volunteers who live within 10 miles of the cemetery.  That is often the fastest way to get a photo of a burial - to request a photo, you must be a FAG member. 

Fred Kolbrener
Woodbridge, VA

Researching: KOLBRENER (LezaJsk); SCHWARTZ (Glogow Malapolski); ZINDEBAND (Minsk); LIFSHITZ (St Petersburg); JABELOW (Minsk); BOHRER (Lezajsk)


Re: JewishGen Talks: Roots of Jews in North Africa: Names and History #JewishGenUpdates

Gerson Sher
 

The post about Jews in North Africa is very interesting. Is anything known about their genetic makeup, particularly their Y-DNA? I've been tested and confirmed as haplotype E-P2, which is the parent haplotype of all North African peoples and is very rare. It's also known as E1b. One of its mutations, I believe E1b1b, is present in 25% of Ashkenazi Jews. E-P2 is most commonly found in 10% of Ethiopian males and, interestingly, it is the major paternal haplotype of African-American males. 

This group originated in northwestern Ethiopia - in the general area of today's Gondar, also of course the ancestral home of the falashas, which is probably a coincidence - and migrated across North Africa to West Africa. That would certainly include the arc of regions covered in this talk. From there, evidently, some 3,000 years later they were sold as slaves and sent by slave ships to the Western Hemisphere.) Perhaps my group of E-P2 instead wandered up the Nile into Egypt and mingled there with the Hebrews and others.)

There is a group of geneticists at the University of Rome who specialize in the study of this group. I've come across a very few North American Jews with the E-P2 haplotype - they are White - but it would be most interesting to identify more.

--------------------------------------
Gerson S. Sher, PhD
1230 23rd St., NW
Apt. 710
Washington, DC  20037
T: (202) 230-9061


"The new dawn blooms as we free it
For there is always light,
if only we’re brave enough to see it
If only we’re brave enough to be it"

--Amanda Gorman
Illegitimi non est carborundum


On Tue, Jan 26, 2021 at 10:58 AM Avraham Groll <agroll@...> wrote:

We invite you to attend another free presentation in our series of JewishGen Talks webinars, with Dr. Alexandre Beider.

 

Roots of Jews in North Africa: Names and History.

Tuesday, February 2, 2021
2:00 pm Eastern Time (New York)

Registration is free with a suggested donation.
Please click here to register now!
 
About the Talk
Today, the Jews whose ancestors lived before mid-20th century in the four countries of Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya) represent the largest Jewish group after the Ashkenazim. Often, they are considered Sephardi. This consideration is partly supported by the historical sources and certain names used. One can distinguish at least three independent layers of Sephardi migrants that came to this area during various periods. Another popular theory considers these Jews to be descendants of Berbers (whose tribes were present in North Africa before the Muslim conquest of these territories in the 7th-8th centuries) converted to Judaism. This theory will be critically addressed during the lecture, along with the roots of one of the most mysterious Jewish communities, that of Ghardaïa, deeply inside the Sahara desert.

About the Speaker:

Alexander Beider was born in Moscow in 1963. He studied mathematics and theoretical physics in Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology from which he received a PhD in applied mathematics (1989). Since 1990, he lives with his family in Paris, France. In 2000, he received his second PhD, this time in the domain of Jewish studies, from Sorbonne. Beider uses onomastics and linguistics as tools allowing to unravel the history of the Jewish people. He has written a series of reference books dealing with the etymology of Jewish surnames, all published by Avotaynu Inc. They include: A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire (1993, 2nd revised edition in 2008), Jewish Surnames in Prague (15th-18th centuries) (1994), A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Kingdom of Poland (1996), A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Galicia (2004), A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Maghreb, Gibraltar, and Malta (2017), and A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Italy, France and “Portuguese” Communities (2019). His Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names (2001) is the reference study in the domain of traditional Yiddish first names. Origins of Yiddish Dialects (Oxford University Press, 2015) synthesizes scholarship on the subject for the half century since the publication of Max Weinreich's “History of the Yiddish Language” (1973) and, according to certain critics, represents a comprehensive and convincing revision of its esteemed predecessor, no less than a new standard work in the domain. Beider is also the designer of the linguistic part of the Beider-Morse Phonetic Matching method of computer-based searches for equivalent surnames.


Registration is free with a suggested donation.
Please click here to register now!



Searching for Hyman, de Young and Van Ryn #unitedkingdom

David Harrison
 

My name is David Harrison and I am searching for living relatives of my cousins in order that I can put names to family photographs.  My mother Phoebe Harrison died in 1972 shortly after her mother Phoebe Van Ryn and when I cleared her house, I collected up about 200 photos together with 7 diaries of my Grandmother and her Birthday Book.  That book started my family research and I forgot about the photos and diaries until recently.  Luckily, I had a good memory of much of my family who died in 1949 -1950 when I was aged 9 to 19.  I found this treasure trove which had been in a box in our loft until it was moved when we had additional roof insulation some years ago and I traced John and Pru, children of Greta Hyman, now long dead and possibly so are these two, but i would like to contact their children (or Grandchildren), also members of the related family of de Young (various spellings.   These two families and also Stephany all came to London and in the 1940 50 period were lining in Wembley Park; they came from Leeuwarden in Friesland, Netherlands and maybe also Emden in Friesland Germany,  they intermarried with Dreilsma and Van Ryn.
The Van Ryn line that I would like to find is from Bob and Irene because I particularly want to identify Hertog Van Ryn's second wife on a photo of my mother aged less than 1 year in 1897.
Of course, I would also like to swap family news and stories., Regards
David Harrison, Birmingham UK
Searching VAN RYN, DRIELSMA, HYMAN. STEPHANY, DE YOUNG


Family Tree of the Jewish People (FTJP)

ifolkson@...
 

Note:  Language must be English.

 For information on genealogy software programs go to http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html#Computers

 

 http://www.jewishgen.org/gedcom/faq/

 

 Since each program is different, you must read the help file and or manual FOR YOUR OWN GENEALOGY PROGRAM.  I suggest you print the directions from the help file before you start.

 

 Generally under the file menu you will see a copy/export option.  This is the option you need to create a gedcom file.  If you have choices for the gedcom file select PAF, UTF-8, Version 5.x.  Be sure you select gedcom.ged as the file type.  The file will usually be created in the same directory as your family tree file.  Note the name before you save.

 

 

Follow these steps:

1.            Go to http://www.jewishgen.org

2.            Select Family Tree of the Jewish People.

3.            Scroll to the bottom of the page Enter your JGID researcher code and password.

4.            Select "I accept and wish to UPLOAD my GEDCOM."

5.            Read the screen and make the appropriate selections.

6.            Select UPLOAD my gedcom.

7.            Click the browse button and find the directory and file you created.  When you see the filename in the field, click the UPLOAD button.  Wait for the message that says your transmission was successful.  If you have a problem sending this way, see option 8.

8.            Select "Alternatively click here to send your file by email". Attach your file to the email form that appears on your task bar.

9.            If you privatize your file it will not only become smaller it will keep private information safe.

 If you still have questions, contact me directly.

 

 

Iris Folkson

 

ifolkson@...

JewishGen - Technical Services


JewishGen Talks: Roots of Jews in North Africa: Names and History #JewishGenUpdates

Avraham Groll
 

We invite you to attend another free presentation in our series of JewishGen Talks webinars, with Dr. Alexandre Beider.

 

Roots of Jews in North Africa: Names and History.

Tuesday, February 2, 2021
2:00 pm Eastern Time (New York)

Registration is free with a suggested donation.
Please click here to register now!
 
About the Talk
Today, the Jews whose ancestors lived before mid-20th century in the four countries of Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya) represent the largest Jewish group after the Ashkenazim. Often, they are considered Sephardi. This consideration is partly supported by the historical sources and certain names used. One can distinguish at least three independent layers of Sephardi migrants that came to this area during various periods. Another popular theory considers these Jews to be descendants of Berbers (whose tribes were present in North Africa before the Muslim conquest of these territories in the 7th-8th centuries) converted to Judaism. This theory will be critically addressed during the lecture, along with the roots of one of the most mysterious Jewish communities, that of Ghardaïa, deeply inside the Sahara desert.

About the Speaker:

Alexander Beider was born in Moscow in 1963. He studied mathematics and theoretical physics in Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology from which he received a PhD in applied mathematics (1989). Since 1990, he lives with his family in Paris, France. In 2000, he received his second PhD, this time in the domain of Jewish studies, from Sorbonne. Beider uses onomastics and linguistics as tools allowing to unravel the history of the Jewish people. He has written a series of reference books dealing with the etymology of Jewish surnames, all published by Avotaynu Inc. They include: A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire (1993, 2nd revised edition in 2008), Jewish Surnames in Prague (15th-18th centuries) (1994), A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Kingdom of Poland (1996), A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Galicia (2004), A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Maghreb, Gibraltar, and Malta (2017), and A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Italy, France and “Portuguese” Communities (2019). His Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names (2001) is the reference study in the domain of traditional Yiddish first names. Origins of Yiddish Dialects (Oxford University Press, 2015) synthesizes scholarship on the subject for the half century since the publication of Max Weinreich's “History of the Yiddish Language” (1973) and, according to certain critics, represents a comprehensive and convincing revision of its esteemed predecessor, no less than a new standard work in the domain. Beider is also the designer of the linguistic part of the Beider-Morse Phonetic Matching method of computer-based searches for equivalent surnames.


Registration is free with a suggested donation.
Please click here to register now!



Re: Naming Conventions #names

binyaminkerman@...
 

As far as I know the convention of naming children in memory of relatives using adapted names that share the first letter is mostly done in specific situations. Usually the actual name of the deceased is used. Examples of when it is commonly adapted would be when naming a child of the other gender (like your question), changing a Yiddish name to a Hebrew equivalent or using variants of the same name, changing uncommon or "old-fashioned" names, or when the name of the deceased is already shared by a sibling (similar to your second question).
So to answer your questions, yes, names are often adapted and given in memory of a relative of the other gender. And while I don't know of many examples, I would guess that multiple children could be named for the same person with adapted names since there are no real rules and it all comes down to the parents' choice.

Binyamin Kerman
Baltimore MD


Witnessing Holocaust History - today, 27 January 2021 #holocaust

Eli Rabinowitz
 

 
Screenshot 2021-01-19 at 16.39.41.png
 
 
 
 
Witnessing Holocaust History event - this Wednesday, 27 January 2021

 

Tomorrow World ORT will mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day in a joint initiative with HAMEC - The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center of Philadelphia and the WE ARE HERE! Foundation in Perth, Australia.

ORT students have already taken part in sessions hearing the testimony of Holocaust survivors and learning the consequences of racism, ethnic cleansing and intolerance.

 

Join us on Wednesday, 27 January at:

9am US EST

2pm GMT

4pm South Africa and Israel

10pm Perth

1am (28 Jan) Sydney and Melbourne

 

The one-hour program will commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day, and we will hear more about the impact the survivors' testimonies have had on our students' understanding of the past.

The program will conclude with a compilation of students singing the Partisans’ Song in different languages.
 

Join us on Zoom via this link: 
https://zoom.us/j/97948035452

 
and at:
 
The recording and the follow-up programs will be on:
 
Best regards,
Eli Rabinowitz
Perth
 
 
Screenshot 2021-01-23 at 20.36.15.png
 
ORT New Logo 2.jpeg


Help translate the last few letters of my Grandfather's collection #lodz #poland #translation

kesspark@...
 

I am am almost through having nearly 250 letters translated over the last eight years and these two (and a few more upcoming) on Viewmate will finish the project.
Thank you so much for all the help that I have gotten. I only wish I could read and understand Yiddish, Russian, Polish and Gothic German!!!
 
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM88643
https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM88644

Thank you in advance,
Rachel Keiles Kessler Park
NYC

KEILES - Vilnius, Lodz, TSIGAR, TOBIAS, ASZ, ELEFAND - Vilnius, KESSLER - Starokonstantinov, LURIE - Dvinsk
DUBIN(sky), NAGIN(sky) - Poltava, ALPERT, SACHS


Where are the HIAS archives? #records #general

relly800@...
 

Does anyone know where ae the HIAS records from WW2 and post War kept? Are they searchable online? 
After the war my parents search for family members most likely also thru HIAS, they may have also received services as refugees in Poland, Russia, and DP camp.
Thanks,
Relly Coleman
FUDALOWICZ
WASSERSTEIN
FELD
WARSZAWSKI


Re: US Naturalization Records #records

Sarah L Meyer
 

A lot depends on where and which court.  I had heard that Fold3 had records, but they did not have Illinois, the central US is mostly lacking in online records.  I did get my zeidi's record by writing to Cook County, Illinois.   Most but not all NY and Philadelphia records appear to be online as are some Washington state and possibly some California.  It is really hit and miss.

--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Re: looking for photos #photographs

viviansilco@...
 

to be able to receive clues or suggestions, you must write where they lived.
Best success,
Vivian Cohen


Re: help finding NY property #usa

debannex@...
 

Hi Todd
The NYC Department of Finance website allows you to do this. I put in the block only (other information did not work) and found the address of 265 Cherry Street. Cherry street is part of the Lower East Side.
https://a836-pts-access.nyc.gov/care/forms/htmlframe.aspx?mode=content/home.htm
Hope this is helpful. You might find a picture at NYC Municipal archives.
Good luck on your search.
--
Deborah Moscou Annex


Re: Naming Conventions #names

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Were males named after females and vice versa?
 
Yes, I was named for my grandfather, Sam, who was dying when I was born.
 
Sally Bruckheimer


I am looking for my stepsister #general

Michaela Appel
 

I only found out now that I have a stepsister. Unfortunately I don't know a name, but maybe someone knows the woman who goes with this story.
Your mother would have to be an Italian citizen. In 1945 she was liberated from Mauthausen or Gussen and then became a DP camp in Leipheim, where she must have met my father Kalman Fuchs-Dikker. My sister should have been born in 1945 or 1946.But her mother went to Italy with another man around 1946/1947/1948.
As I found out, my father was looking for her but unfortunately never found it.
If someone knows such an experience, please contact me.
thanks
 
 
Michaela Fuchs-Appel 

7041 - 7060 of 661957